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Save Up To 75% With This Atorvastatin Calcium Discount Card!

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Estimated Savings Of Over $9,817,693

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Our FREE Atorvastatin Calcium discount card helps you save money on the exact same Atorvastatin Calcium prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Atorvastatin Calcium prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

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Atorvastatin Calcium prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Atorvastatin Calcium safely and effectively.
Before taking Atorvastatin Calcium please consult with your doctor.
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE Therapy with lipid-altering agents should be only one component of multiple risk factor intervention in individuals at significantly increased risk for atherosclerotic vascular disease due to hypercholesterolemia. Drug therapy is recommended as an adjunct to diet when the response to a diet restricted in saturated fat and cholesterol and other nonpharmacologic measures alone has been inadequate. In patients with CHD or multiple risk factors for CHD, atorvastatin calcium tablets can be started simultaneously with diet. Atorvastatin calcium tablet is an inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase (statin) indicated as an adjunct therapy to diet to: Reduce the risk of MI, stroke, revascularization procedures, and angina in patients without CHD, but with multiple risk factors (1.1). Reduce the risk of MI and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes without CHD, but with multiple risk factors (1.1). Reduce the risk of non-fatal MI, fatal and non-fatal stroke, revascularization procedures, hospitalization for CHF, and angina in patients with CHD (1.1). Reduce elevated total-C, LDL-C, apo B, and TG levels and increase HDL-C in adult patients with primary hyperlipidemia (heterozygous familial and nonfamilial) and mixed dyslipidemia (1.2). Reduce elevated TG in patients with hypertriglyceridemia and primary dysbetalipoproteinemia (1.2). Reduce total-C and LDL-C in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) (1.2). Reduce elevated total-C, LDL-C, and apo B levels in boys and postmenarchal girls, 10 to 17 years of age, with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia after failing an adequate trial of diet therapy (1.2). Limitations of Use Atorvastatin calcium tablets have not been studied in Fredrickson Types I and V dyslipidemias. 1.1 Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease In adult patients without clinically evident coronary heart disease, but with multiple risk factors for coronary heart disease such as age, smoking, hypertension, low HDL-C, or a family history of early coronary heart disease, atorvastatin calcium tablets are indicated to: Reduce the risk of myocardial infarction Reduce the risk of stroke Reduce the risk for revascularization procedures and angina In patients with type 2 diabetes, and without clinically evident coronary heart disease, but with multiple risk factors for coronary heart disease such as retinopathy, albuminuria, smoking, or hypertension, atorvastatin calcium tablets are indicated to: Reduce the risk of myocardial infarction Reduce the risk of stroke In patients with clinically evident coronary heart disease, atorvastatin calcium tablets are indicated to: Reduce the risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction Reduce the risk of fatal and non-fatal stroke Reduce the risk for revascularization procedures Reduce the risk of hospitalization for CHF Reduce the risk of angina 1.2 Hyperlipidemia Atorvastatin calcium tablets are indicated: As an adjunct to diet to reduce elevated total-C, LDL-C, apo B, and TG levels and to increase HDL-C in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia (heterozygous familial and nonfamilial) and mixed dyslipidemia (Fredrickson Types IIa and IIb); As an adjunct to diet for the treatment of patients with elevated serum TG levels (Fredrickson Type IV); For the treatment of patients with primary dysbetalipoproteinemia (Fredrickson Type III) who do not respond adequately to diet; To reduce total-C and LDL-C in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia as an adjunct to other lipid-lowering treatments (e.g., LDL apheresis) or if such treatments are unavailable; As an adjunct to diet to reduce total-C, LDL-C, and apo B levels in boys and postmenarchal girls, 10 to 17 years of age, with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia if after an adequate trial of diet therapy the following findings are present: a. LDL-C remains ≥ 190 mg/dL or b. LDL-C remains ≥ 160 mg/dL and: there is a positive family history of premature cardiovascular disease or two or more other CVD risk factors are present in the pediatric patient 1.3 Limitations of Use Atorvastatin calcium tablets have not been studied in conditions where the major lipoprotein abnormality is elevation of chylomicrons (Fredrickson Types I and V).
3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Atorvastatin calcium tablets of 80 mg are white to off-white, oval shaped, biconvex, film coated tablets debossed ‘RDY’on one side and ‘124’ on other side. 80 mg tablets (3).
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Active liver disease, which may include unexplained persistent elevations in hepatic transaminase levels (4.1). Women who are pregnant or may become pregnant (4.3). Nursing mothers (4.4). Hypersensitivity to any component of this medication (4.2). 4.1 Active Liver Disease which may include Unexplained Persistent Elevations of Hepatic Transaminase Levels 4.2 Hypersensitivity to any component of this medication 4.3 Pregnancy Women who are pregnant or may become pregnant. Atorvastatin calcium may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides increase during normal pregnancy, and cholesterol or cholesterol derivatives are essential for fetal development. Atherosclerosis is a chronic process and discontinuation of lipid-lowering drugs during pregnancy should have little impact on the outcome of long-term therapy of primary hypercholesterolemia. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of atorvastatin calcium use during pregnancy; however in rare reports, congenital anomalies were observed following intrauterine exposure to statins. In rat and rabbit animal reproduction studies, atorvastatin revealed no evidence of teratogenicity. ATORVASTATIN CALCIUM SHOULD BE ADMINISTERED TO WOMEN OF CHILDBEARING AGE ONLY WHEN SUCH PATIENTS ARE HIGHLY UNLIKELY TO CONCEIVE AND HAVE BEEN INFORMED OF THE POTENTIAL HAZARDS. If the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, atorvastatin calcium should be discontinued immediately and the patient apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1 ) ]. 4.4 Nursing mothers It is not known whether atorvastatin is excreted into human milk; however a small amount of another drug in this class does pass into breast milk. Because statins have the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants, women who require atorvastatin calcium treatment should not breastfeed their infants [see Use in Specific Populations (8.3) ].
5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Skeletal muscle effects (e.g., myopathy and rhabdomyolysis): Risks increase when higher doses are used concomitantly with cyclosporine, fibrates, and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., clarithromycin, itraconazole, HIV protease inhibitors). Predisposing factors include advanced age (> 65), uncontrolled hypothyroidism, and renal impairment. Rare cases of rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure secondary to myoglobinuria have been reported. Advise patients to promptly report to their physician unexplained and/or persistent muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness. Atorvastatin calcium therapy should be discontinued if myopathy is diagnosed or suspected (5.1, 8.5). Liver enzyme abnormalities: Persistent elevations in hepatic transaminases can occur. Check liver enzyme tests before initiating therapy and as clinically indicated thereafter (5.2). A higher incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was seen in patients without CHD but with stroke or TIA within the previous 6 months in the atorvastatin calcium 80 mg group vs. placebo (5.5). 5.1 Skeletal Muscle Rare cases of rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure secondary to myoglobinuria have been reported with atorvastatin calcium and with other drugs in this class. A history of renal impairment may be a risk factor for the development of rhabdomyolysis. Such patients merit closer monitoring for skeletal muscle effects. Atorvastatin, like other statins, occasionally causes myopathy, defined as muscle aches or muscle weakness in conjunction with increases in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) values >10 times ULN. The concomitant use of higher doses of atorvastatin with certain drugs such as cyclosporine and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., clarithromycin, itraconazole, and HIV protease inhibitors) increases the risk of myopathy/rhabdomyolysis. There have been rare reports of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM), an autoimmune myopathy, associated with statin use. IMNM is characterized by: proximal muscle weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase, which persist despite discontinuation of statin treatment; muscle biopsy showing necrotizing myopathy without significant inflammation; improvement with immunosuppressive agents. Myopathy should be considered in any patient with diffuse myalgias, muscle tenderness or weakness, and/or marked elevation of CPK. Patients should be advised to report promptly unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness, particularly if accompanied by malaise or fever, or if muscle signs and symptoms persist after discontinuing atorvastatin. Atorvastatin calcium therapy should be discontinued if markedly elevated CPK levels occur or myopathy is diagnosed or suspected. The risk of myopathy during treatment with drugs in this class is increased with concurrent administration of cyclosporine, fibric acid derivatives, erythromycin, clarithromycin, the hepatitis C protease inhibitor telaprevir, combinations of HIV protease inhibitors, including saquinavir plus ritonavir, lopinavir plus ritonavir, tipranavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, and fosamprenavir plus ritonavir, niacin, or azole antifungals. Physicians considering combined therapy with atorvastatin calcium and fibric acid derivatives, erythromycin, clarithromycin, a combination of saquinavir plus ritonavir, lopinavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, or fosamprenavir plus ritonavir, azole antifungals, or lipid-modifying doses of niacin should carefully weigh the potential benefits and risks and should carefully monitor patients for any signs or symptoms of muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness, particularly during the initial months of therapy and during any periods of upward dosage titration of either drug. Lower starting and maintenance doses of atorvastatin should be considered when taken concomitantly with the aforementioned drugs (see Drug Interactions (7) ). Periodic creatine phosphokinase (CPK) determinations may be considered in such situations, but there is no assurance that such monitoring will prevent the occurrence of severe myopathy. Prescribing recommendations for interacting agents are summarized in Table 1 [see also Dosage and Administration (2.6), Drug Interactions (7), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. Table 1. Drug Interactions Associated with Increased Risk of Myopathy/Rhabdomyolysis Interacting Agents Prescribing Recommendations Cyclosporine, HIV protease inhibitors (tipranavir plus ritonavir), hepatitis C protease inhibitor (telaprevir) Avoid atorvastatin HIV protease inhibitor (lopinavir plus ritonavir) Use with caution and lowest dose necessary Clarithromycin, itraconazole, HIV protease inhibitors (saquinavir plus ritonavir*, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, fosamprenavir plus ritonavir) Do not exceed 20 mg atorvastatin daily HIV protease inhibitor (nelfinavir) Hepatitis C protease inhibitor (boceprevir) Do not exceed 40 mg atorvastatin daily *Use with caution and with the lowest dose necessary (12.3) Cases of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis, have been reported with atorvastatin co-administered with colchicine, and caution should be exercised when prescribing atorvastatin with colchicine [see Drug Interactions (7.11) ] Atorvastatin calcium therapy should be temporarily withheld or discontinued in any patient with an acute, serious condition suggestive of a myopathy or having a risk factor predisposing to the development of renal failure secondary to rhabdomyolysis (e.g., severe acute infection, hypotension, major surgery, trauma, severe metabolic, endocrine and electrolyte disorders, and uncontrolled seizures). 5.2 Liver Dysfunction Statins, like some other lipid-lowering therapies, have been associated with biochemical abnormalities of liver function. Persistent elevations (>3 times the upper limit of normal [ULN] occurring on 2 or more occasions) in serum transaminases occurred in 0.7% of patients who received atorvastatin calcium in clinical trials. The incidence of these abnormalities was 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.6%, and 2.3% for 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg, respectively. One patient in clinical trials developed jaundice. Increases in liver function tests (LFT) in other patients were not associated with jaundice or other clinical signs or symptoms. Upon dose reduction, drug interruption, or discontinuation, transaminase levels returned to or near pretreatment levels without sequelae. Eighteen of 30 patients with persistent LFT elevations continued treatment with a reduced dose of atorvastatin calcium. It is recommended that liver enzyme tests be obtained prior to initiating therapy with atorvastatin calcium and repeated as clinically indicated. There have been rare postmarketing reports of fatal and non-fatal hepatic failure in patients taking statins, including atorvastatin. If serious liver injury with clinical symptoms and/or hyperbilirubinemia or jaundice occurs during treatment with atorvastatin calcium, promptly interrupt therapy. If an alternate etiology is not found, do not restart atorvastatin calcium. Atorvastatin calcium should be used with caution in patients who consume substantial quantities of alcohol and/or have a history of liver disease. Active liver disease or unexplained persistent transaminase elevations are contraindications to the use of atorvastatin calcium [see Contraindications (4.1) ]. 5.3 Endocrine Function Increased in HbA1c and fasting serum glucose levels have been reported with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, including atorvastatin calcium. Statins interfere with cholesterol synthesis and theoretically might blunt adrenal and/or gonadal steroid production. Clinical studies have shown that atorvastatin calcium does not reduce basal plasma cortisol concentration or impair adrenal reserve. The effects of statins on male fertility have not been studied in adequate numbers of patients. The effects, if any, on the pituitary-gonadal axis in premenopausal women are unknown. Caution should be exercised if a statin is administered concomitantly with drugs that may decrease the levels or activity of endogenous steroid hormones, such as ketoconazole, spironolactone, and cimetidine. 5.4 CNS Toxicity Brain hemorrhage was seen in a female dog treated for 3 months at 120 mg/kg/day. Brain hemorrhage and optic nerve vacuolation were seen in another female dog that was sacrificed in moribund condition after 11 weeks of escalating doses up to 280 mg/kg/day. The 120 mg/kg dose resulted in a systemic exposure approximately 16 times the human plasma area-under-the-curve (AUC, 0-24 hours) based on the maximum human dose of 80 mg/day. A single tonic convulsion was seen in each of 2 male dogs (one treated at 10 mg/kg/day and one at 120 mg/kg/day) in a 2-year study. No CNS lesions have been observed in mice after chronic treatment for up to 2 years at doses up to 400 mg/kg/day or in rats at doses up to 100 mg/kg/day. These doses were 6 to 11 times (mouse) and 8 to 16 times (rat) the human AUC (0-24) based on the maximum recommended human dose of 80 mg/day. CNS vascular lesions, characterized by perivascular hemorrhages, edema, and mononuclear cell infiltration of perivascular spaces, have been observed in dogs treated with other members of this class. A chemically similar drug in this class produced optic nerve degeneration (Wallerian degeneration of retinogeniculate fibers) in clinically normal dogs in a dose-dependent fashion at a dose that produced plasma drug levels about 30 times higher than the mean drug level in humans taking the highest recommended dose. 5.5 Use in Patients with Recent Stroke or TIA In a post-hoc analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) study where atorvastatin calcium 80 mg vs. placebo was administered in 4,731 subjects without CHD who had a stroke or TIA within the preceding 6 months, a higher incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was seen in the atorvastatin calcium 80 mg group compared to placebo (55, 2.3% atorvastatin vs. 33, 1.4% placebo; HR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.09, 2.59; p=0.0168). The incidence of fatal hemorrhagic stroke was similar across treatment groups (17 vs. 18 for the atorvastatin and placebo groups, respectively). The incidence of nonfatal hemorrhagic stroke was significantly higher in the atorvastatin group (38, 1.6%) as compared to the placebo group (16, 0.7%). Some baseline characteristics, including hemorrhagic and lacunar stroke on study entry, were associated with a higher incidence of hemorrhagic stroke in the atorvastatin group [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) ].
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the label: Rhabdomyolysis and myopathy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Liver enzyme abnormalities [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ] The most commonly reported adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 2%) in patients treated with atorvastatin calcium in placebo-controlled trials regardless of causality were: nasopharyngitis, arthralgia, diarrhea, pain in extremity, and urinary tract infection (6.1). To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Inc., at 1-888-375-3784 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch 6.1 Clinical Trial Adverse Experiences Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, the adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice. In the atorvastatin calcium placebo-controlled clinical trial database of 16,066 patients (8755 atorvastatin calcium vs. 7311 placebo; age range 10 to 93 years, 39% women, 91% Caucasians, 3% Blacks, 2% Asians, 4% other) with a median treatment duration of 53 weeks, 9.7% of patients on atorvastatin calcium and 9.5% of the patients on placebo discontinued due to adverse reactions regardless of causality. The five most common adverse reactions in patients treated with atorvastatin calcium that led to treatment discontinuation and occurred at a rate greater than placebo were: myalgia (0.7%), diarrhea (0.5%), nausea (0.4%), alanine aminotransferase increase (0.4%), and hepatic enzyme increase (0.4%). The most commonly reported adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 2% and greater than placebo) regardless of causality, in patients treated with atorvastatin calcium in placebo controlled trials (n=8755) were: nasopharyngitis (8.3%), arthralgia (6.9%), diarrhea (6.8%), pain in extremity (6%), and urinary tract infection (5.7%). Table 2 summarizes the frequency of clinical adverse reactions, regardless of causality, reported in ≥ 2% and at a rate greater than placebo in patients treated with atorvastatin calcium (n=8755), from seventeen placebo-controlled trials. Table 2. Clinical adverse reactions occurring in ≥ 2% in patients treated with any dose of atorvastatin calcium and at an incidence greater than placebo regardless of causality (% of patients). Adverse Reaction* Any dose N=8755 10 mg N=3908 20 mg N=188 40 mg N=604 80 mg N=4055 Placebo N=7311 Nasopharyngitis 8.3 12.9 5.3 7 4.2 8.2 Arthralgia 6.9 8.9 11.7 10.6 4.3 6.5 Diarrhea 6.8 7.3 6.4 14.1 5.2 6.3 Pain in extremity 6 8.5 3.7 9.3 3.1 5.9 Urinary tractinfection 5.7 6.9 6.4 8 4.1 5.6 Dyspepsia 4.7 5.9 3.2 6 3.3 4.3 Nausea 4 3.7 3.7 7.1 3.8 3.5 Musculoskeletal pain 3.8 5.2 3.2 5.1 2.3 3.6 Muscle Spasms 3.6 4.6 4.8 5.1 2.4 3 Myalgia 3.5 3.6 5.9 8.4 2.7 3.1 Insomnia 3 2.8 1.1 5.3 2.8 2.9 Pharyngolaryngeal pain 2.3 3.9 1.6 2.8 0.7 2.1 * Adverse Reaction ≥ 2% in any dose greater than placebo Other adverse reactions reported in placebo-controlled studies include: Body as a whole: malaise, pyrexia; Digestive system: abdominal discomfort, eructation, flatulence, hepatitis, cholestasis; Musculoskeletal system: musculoskeletal pain, muscle fatigue, neck pain, joint swelling; Metabolic and nutritional system: transaminases increase, liver function test abnormal, blood alkaline phosphatase increase, creatine phosphokinase increase, hyperglycemia; Nervous system: nightmare; Respiratory system: epistaxis; Skin and appendages: urticaria; Special senses: vision blurred, tinnitus; Urogenital system: white blood cells urine positive. Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) In ASCOT [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ] involving 10,305 participants (age range 40 to 80 years, 19% women; 94.6% Caucasians, 2.6% Africans, 1.5% South Asians, 1.3% mixed/other) treated with atorvastatin calcium 10 mg daily (n=5,168) or placebo (n=5,137), the safety and tolerability profile of the group treated with atorvastatin calcium was comparable to that of the group treated with placebo during a median of 3.3 years of follow-up. Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS) In CARDS [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ] involving 2,838 subjects (age range 39 to 77 years, 32% women; 94.3% Caucasians, 2.4% South Asians, 2.3% Afro-Caribbean, 1% other) with type 2 diabetes treated with atorvastatin calcium 10 mg daily (n=1,428) or placebo (n=1,410), there was no difference in the overall frequency of adverse reactions or serious adverse reactions between the treatment groups during a median follow-up of 3.9 years. No cases of rhabdomyolysis were reported. Treating to New Targets Study (TNT) In TNT [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ] involving 10,001 subjects (age range 29 to 78 years, 19% women; 94.1% Caucasians, 2.9% Blacks, 1% Asians, 2% other) with clinically evident CHD treated with atorvastatin calcium 10 mg daily (n=5006) or atorvastatin calcium 80 mg daily (n=4995), there were more serious adverse reactions and discontinuations due to adverse reactions in the high-dose atorvastatin group (92, 1.8%; 497, 9.9%, respectively) as compared to the low-dose group (69, 1.4%; 404, 8.1%, respectively) during a median follow-up of 4.9 years. Persistent transaminase elevations (≥3 x ULN twice within 4 to 10 days) occurred in 62 (1.3%) individuals with atorvastatin 80 mg and in nine (0.2%) individuals with atorvastatin 10 mg. Elevations of CK (≥ 10 x ULN) were low overall, but were higher in the high-dose atorvastatin treatment group (13, 0.3%) compared to the low-dose atorvastatin group (6, 0.1%). Incremental Decrease in Endpoints through Aggressive Lipid Lowering Study (IDEAL) In IDEAL [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ] involving 8,888 subjects (age range 26 to 80 years, 19% women; 99.3% Caucasians, 0.4% Asians, 0.3% Blacks, 0.04% other) treated with atorvastatin calcium 80 mg/day (n=4439) or simvastatin 20 to 40 mg daily (n=4449), there was no difference in the overall frequency of adverse reactions or serious adverse reactions between the treatment groups during a median follow-up of 4.8 years. Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) In SPARCL involving 4731 subjects (age range 21 to 92 years, 40% women; 93.3% Caucasians, 3% Blacks, 0.6% Asians, 3.1% other) without clinically evident CHD but with a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within the previous 6 months treated with atorvastatin calcium 80 mg (n=2365) or placebo (n=2366) for a median follow-up of 4.9 years, there was a higher incidence of persistent hepatic transaminase elevations (≥ 3 x ULN twice within 4 to 10 days) in the atorvastatin group (0.9%) compared to placebo (0.1%). Elevations of CK (>10 x ULN) were rare, but were higher in the atorvastatin group (0.1%) compared to placebo (0%). Diabetes was reported as an adverse reaction in 144 subjects (6.1%) in the atorvastatin group and 89 subjects (3.8%) in the placebo group [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) ]. In a post-hoc analysis, atorvastatin calcium 80 mg reduced the incidence of ischemic stroke (218/2365, 9.2% vs. 274/2366, 11.6%) and increased the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke (55/2365, 2.3% vs. 33/2366, 1.4%) compared to placebo. The incidence of fatal hemorrhagic stroke was similar between groups (17 atorvastatin calcium vs. 18 placebo). The incidence of non-fatal hemorrhagic strokes was significantly greater in the atorvastatin group (38 non-fatal hemorrhagic strokes) as compared to the placebo group (16 non-fatal hemorrhagic strokes). Subjects who entered the study with a hemorrhagic stroke appeared to be at increased risk for hemorrhagic stroke [7 (16%) atorvastatin calcium vs. 2 (4%) placebo]. There were no significant differences between the treatment groups for all-cause mortality: 216 (9.1%) in the atorvastatin calcium 80 mg/day group vs. 211 (8.9%) in the placebo group. The proportions of subjects who experienced cardiovascular death were numerically smaller in the atorvastatin calcium 80 mg group (3.3%) than in the placebo group (4.1%). The proportions of subjects who experienced non-cardiovascular death were numerically larger in the atorvastatin calcium 80 mg group (5%) than in the placebo group (4%). 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of atorvastatin calcium. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Adverse reactions associated with atorvastatin calcium therapy reported since market introduction, that are not listed above, regardless of causality assessment, include the following: anaphylaxis, angioneurotic edema, bullous rashes (including erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis), rhabdomyolysis, myositis, fatigue, tendon rupture, fatal and non-fatal hepatic failure, dizziness, depression, peripheral neuropathy and pancreatitis. There have been rare reports of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy associated with statin use [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ] There have been rare postmarketing reports of cognitive impairment (e.g., memory loss, forgetfulness, amnesia, memory impairment, confusion) associated with statin use. These cognitive issues have been reported for all statins. The reports are generally nonserious, and reversible upon statin discontinuation, with variable times to symptom onset (1 day to years) and symptom resolution (median of 3 weeks). 6.3 Pediatric Patients (ages 10 to 17 years) In a 26-week controlled study in boys and postmenarchal girls (n=140, 31% female; 92% Caucasians, 1.6% Blacks, 1.6% Asians, 4.8% other), the safety and tolerability profile of atorvastatin calcium 10 to 20 mg daily was generally similar to that of placebo [see Clinical Studies (14.6) and Use in Special Populations, Pediatric Use (8.4) ].
7 DRUG INTERACTIONS The risk of myopathy during treatment with statins is increased with concurrent administration of fibric acid derivatives, lipid-modifying doses of niacin, cyclosporine, or strong CYP 3A4 inhibitors (e.g., clarithromycin, HIV protease inhibitors, and itraconazole) [see Warnings and Precautions, Skeletal Muscle (5.1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. Drug Interactions Associated with Increased Risk of Myopathy/Rhabdomyolysis (2.6, 5.1, 7, 12.3) Interacting Agents Prescribing Recommendations Cyclosporine, HIV protease inhibitors (tipranavir plus ritonavir), hepatitis C protease inhibitor (telaprevir) Avoid atorvastatin HIV protease inhibitor (lopinavir plus ritonavir) Use with caution and lowest dose necessary Clarithromycin, itraconazole, HIV protease inhibitors (saquinavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, fosamprenavir plus ritonavir) Do not exceed 20 mg atorvastatin daily HIV protease inhibitors (nelfinavir) Hepatitis C protease inhibitor (boceprevir) Do not exceed 40 mg atorvastatin daily Other Lipid-Lowering Medications: Use with fibrate products or lipid-modifying doses (≥1 g/day) of niacin increases the risk of adverse skeletal muscle effects. Caution should be used when prescribing with atorvastatin calcium (7). Digoxin: Patients should be monitored appropriately (7.8). Oral Contraceptives: Values for norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol may be increased (7.9). Rifampin should be simultaneously co-administered with atorvastatin calcium (7.7). 7.1 Strong Inhibitors of CYP 3A4 Atorvastatin calcium is metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4. Concomitant administration of atorvastatin calcium with strong inhibitors of CYP 3A4 can lead to increases in plasma concentrations of atorvastatin. The extent of interaction and potentiation of effects depend on the variability of effect on CYP 3A4. Clarithromycin:Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin calcium 80 mg with clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily) compared to that of atorvastatin calcium alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. Therefore, in patients taking clarithromycin, caution should be used when the atorvastatin calcium dose exceeds 20 mg [see Warnings and Precautions, Skeletal Muscle (5.1) and Dosage and Administration (2.6) ]. Combination of Protease Inhibitors: Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin calcium with several combinations of HIV protease inhibitors, as well as with the hepatitis C protease inhibitor telaprevir, compared to that of atorvastatin calcium alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. Therefore, in patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor tipranavir plus ritonavir, or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor telaprevir, concomitant use of atorvastatin calcium should be avoided. In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir plus ritonavir, caution should be used when prescribing atorvastatin calcium and the lowest dose necessary should be used. In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitors saquinavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, or fosamprenavir plus ritonavir, the dose of atorvastatin calcium should not exceed 20 mg and should be used with caution [see Warnings and Precautions, Skeletal Muscle (5.1) and Dosage and Administration (2.6) ]. In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor boceprevir, the dose of atorvastatin calcium should not exceed 40 mg and close clinical monitoring is recommended. Itraconazole:Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin calcium 40 mg and itraconazole 200 mg [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. Therefore, in patients taking itraconazole, caution should be used when the atorvastatin calcium dose exceeds 20 mg [see Warnings and Precautions, Skeletal Muscle (5.1) and Dosage and Administration (2.6) ]. 7.2 Grapefruit Juice Contains one or more components that inhibit CYP 3A4 and can increase plasma concentrations of atorvastatin, especially with excessive grapefruit juice consumption (>1.2 liters per day). 7.3 Cyclosporine Atorvastatin and atorvastatin-metabolites are substrates of the OATP1B1 transporter. Inhibitors of the OATP1B1 (e.g., cyclosporine) can increase the bioavailability of atorvastatin. Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin calcium 10 mg and cyclosporine 5.2 mg/kg/day compared to that of atorvastatin calcium alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. The co-administration of atorvastatin calcium with cyclosporine should be avoided [see Warnings and Precautions, Skeletal Muscle (5.1) ]. 7.4 Gemfibrozil Due to an increased risk of myopathy/rhabdomyolysis when HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are co-administered with gemfibrozil, concomitant administration of atorvastatin calcium with gemfibrozil should be avoided [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ]. 7.5 Other Fibrates Because it is known that the risk of myopathy during treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors is increased with concurrent administration of other fibrates, atorvastatin calcium should be administered with caution when used concomitantly with other fibrates [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ]. 7.6 Niacin The risk of skeletal muscle effects may be enhanced when atorvastatin calcium is used in combination with niacin; a reduction in atorvastatin calcium dosage should be considered in this setting [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ]. 7.7 Rifampin or other Inducers of Cytochrome P450 3A4 Concomitant administration of atorvastatin calcium with inducers of cytochrome P450 3A4 (e.g., efavirenz, rifampin) can lead to variable reductions in plasma concentrations of atorvastatin. Due to the dual interaction mechanism of rifampin, simultaneous co-administration of atorvastatin calcium with rifampin is recommended, as delayed administration of atorvastatin calcium after administration of rifampin has been associated with a significant reduction in atorvastatin plasma concentrations. 7.8 Digoxin When multiple doses of atorvastatin calcium and digoxin were co-administered, steady state plasma digoxin concentrations increased by approximately 20%. Patients taking digoxin should be monitored appropriately. 7.9 Oral Contraceptives Co-administration of atorvastatin calcium and an oral contraceptive increased AUC values for norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. These increases should be considered when selecting an oral contraceptive for a woman taking atorvastatin calcium. 7.10 Warfarin Atorvastatin calcium had no clinically significant effect on prothrombin time when administered to patients receiving chronic warfarin treatment. 7.11 Colchicine Cases of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis, have been reported with atorvastatin co-administered with colchicine, and caution should be exercised when prescribing atorvastatin with colchicine.
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Hepatic impairment: Plasma concentrations markedly increased in patients with chronic alcoholic liver disease (12.3). 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category X Atorvastatin calcium is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides increase during normal pregnancy. Lipid lowering drugs offer no benefit during pregnancy because cholesterol and cholesterol derivatives are needed for normal fetal development. Atherosclerosis is a chronic process, and discontinuation of lipid-lowering drugs during pregnancy should have little impact on long-term outcomes of primary hypercholesterolemia therapy. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of atorvastatin use during pregnancy. There have been rare reports of congenital anomalies following intrauterine exposure to statins. In a review of about 100 prospectively followed pregnancies in women exposed to other statins, the incidences of congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortions, and fetal deaths/stillbirths did not exceed the rate expected in the general population. However, this study was only able to exclude a three-to-four-fold increased risk of congenital anomalies over background incidence. In 89% of these cases, drug treatment started before pregnancy and stopped during the first trimester when pregnancy was identified. Atorvastatin crosses the rat placenta and reaches a level in fetal liver equivalent to that of maternal plasma. Atorvastatin was not teratogenic in rats at doses up to 300 mg/kg/day or in rabbits at doses up to 100 mg/kg/day. These doses resulted in multiples of about 30 times (rat) or 20 times (rabbit) the human exposure based on surface area (mg/m2) [see Contraindications, Pregnancy (4.3) ]. In a study in rats given 20, 100, or 225 mg/kg/day, from gestation day 7 through to lactation day 21 (weaning), there was decreased pup survival at birth, neonate, weaning, and maturity in pups of mothers dosed with 225 mg/kg/day. Body weight was decreased on days 4 and 21 in pups of mothers dosed at 100 mg/kg/day; pup body weight was decreased at birth and at days 4, 21, and 91 at 225 mg/kg/day. Pup development was delayed (rotorod performance at 100 mg/kg/day and acoustic startle at 225 mg/kg/day; pinnae detachment and eye-opening at 225 mg/kg/day). These doses correspond to 6 times (100 mg/kg) and 22 times (225 mg/kg) the human AUC at 80 mg/day. Statins may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Atorvastatin calcium should be administered to women of childbearing potential only when such patients are highly unlikely to conceive and have been informed of the potential hazards. If the woman becomes pregnant while taking atorvastatin calcium, it should be discontinued immediately and the patient advised again as to the potential hazards to the fetus and the lack of known clinical benefit with continued use during pregnancy. 8.3 Nursing Mothers It is not known whether atorvastatin is excreted in human milk, but a small amount of another drug in this class does pass into breast milk. Nursing rat pups had plasma and liver drug levels of 50% and 40%, respectively, of that in their mother’s milk. Animal breast milk drug levels may not accurately reflect human breast milk levels. Because another drug in this class passes into human milk and because statins have a potential to cause serious adverse reactions in nursing infants, women requiring atorvastatin calcium treatment should be advised not to nurse their infants [see Contraindications (4) ]. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in patients 10 to 17 years of age with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia have been evaluated in a controlled clinical trial of 6 months’ duration in adolescent boys and postmenarchal girls. Patients treated with atorvastatin calcium had an adverse experience profile generally similar to that of patients treated with placebo. The most common adverse experiences observed in both groups, regardless of causality assessment, were infections. Doses greater than 20 mg have not been studied in this patient population. In this limited controlled study, there was no significant effect on growth or sexual maturation in boys or on menstrual cycle length in girls [see Clinical Studies (14.6); Adverse Reactions, Pediatric Patients (ages 10 to 17 years) (6.3); and Dosage and Administration, Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia in Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years of age) (2.2) ]. Adolescent females should be counseled on appropriate contraceptive methods while on atorvastatin calcium therapy [see Contraindications, Pregnancy (4.3) and Use in Specific Populations, Pregnancy (8.1) ]. Clinical efficacy with doses up to 80 mg/day for 1 year have been evaluated in an uncontrolled study of patients with homozygous FH including 8 pediatric patients [see Clinical Studies, Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (14.5) ]. 8.5 Geriatric Use Of the 39,828 patients who received atorvastatin calcium in clinical studies, 15,813 (40%) were ≥65 years old and 2,800 (7%) were ≥75 years old. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older adults cannot be ruled out. Since advanced age (≥65 years) is a predisposing factor for myopathy, atorvastatin calcium should be prescribed with caution in the elderly. 8.6 Hepatic Impairment Atorvastatin calcium is contraindicated in patients with active liver disease which may include unexplained persistent elevations in hepatic transaminase levels [see Contraindications (4) and Pharmacokinetics (12.3) ].

Save on the cost of Atorvastatin Calcium

With Our Atorvastatin Calcium Discount Card

Be sure to ask your pharmacist not to substitute another card for ours as we are confident we offer the highest savings possible.

Medication Discount Card Medication Discount Card
Frequently Asked Questions

There are no catches to this. Simply print the card, take it to your pharmacy, and save. If you still have questions just read below...

How Do I Know My Pharmacy Will Accept It?
That's simple. The card is accepted at ALL CHAIN PHARMACIES such as CVS, Rite Aid, and Walgreens. If you don't know if your pharmacy accepts the card simply call them and give them the BIN and PCN numbers on the card. The card is accepted at most pharmacies. If you call a few one is sure to accept it.
Can I Use This In Conjunction With My Insurance?
No, unfortunately insurance companies don't allow "double-savings". However, if your insurance does not cover certain drugs (ex - cosmetic drugs, brand names, prenatal vitamins, etc) then this card may save you money. Also if your insurance requires you to pay a deductible on your brand name drugs before covering them, then this card may also provider greater savings!
How Much Will This Card Save Me?
You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
This Sounds Too Good To Be True. Is This A Scam?
Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
My Pharmacy Isn't Included. Can They Participate?
Yes! There are pharmacies who accept the pharmacy savings card that are not on our list. If you find one please email us and we'll update the list. If they are not a current partner and are interested, email us and we'll contact them to try and convince them to participate. You may also choose to call around and see if someone else in your area accepts it.
Is this the same as an Atorvastatin Calcium copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
Savings of 70%!
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Savings of over 50%!
I had printed out 3 different discount cards on the internet and asked the pharmacist to check prices. The lowest price was $289. I searched the internet some more, I found this site, gave the pharmacy your card and the cost was $130. What a big savings, I can't thank this site enough. - Linda S.

Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

Accepted At Over 59,000 Pharmacies Nationwide!

Including...
  • Including...
  • Cub Pharmacy
  • Kmart
  • HEB
  • Target
  • Winn Dixie
  • Costco
  • Safeway
  • Kroger
  • Tom Thumb
  • CVS
  • Brookshire`s
  • Rite Aid
  • Fred`s Pharmacy
  • Walmart
  • Long Drugs
  • Walgreens
  • Giant
  • Save Mart Pharmacy
  • Fred Meyer
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And thousands of independent pharmacies nationwide!

Atorvastatin Calcium Coupon

Currently we do not have any available, however you can receive an instant discount at your pharmacy with our Atorvastatin Calcium discount card. Create one instantly

Important Note

The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

This Atorvastatin Calcium discount should not be confused with an Atorvastatin Calcium coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

MedicationDiscountCard.com offers Average Savings of
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"I have been using the RX card for almost a year now. In that time, it has saved my family over $4000. We have no insurance, and the RX card has been a God send. My husband and I are both disabled, and my 65-year old mother is almost blind and diabetic, so we would have simply had to do without. The RX card enabled us to have the meds we need. Thank you so very much!" - Sharon H.
Save up to 75% on your medication
Save up to 75% on your medication