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Estimated Savings Of Over $9,840,544

Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Azilect discount card helps you save money on the exact same Azilect prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Azilect prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

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Azilect prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Azilect safely and effectively.
Before taking Azilect please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Azilect.
Indications and Usage (1)Dosage and Administration (2.1) Warnings and Precautions (5.2, 5.3, 5.6, 5.8, 5.9)
05/2014
05/2014
05/2014
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE AZILECT (rasagiline tablets) is indicated for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). AZILECT, a monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor (MAOI), is indicated for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (1)
3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS AZILECT 0.5 mg Tablets: White to off-white, round, flat, beveled tablets, debossed with “GIL 0.5” on one side and plain on the other side containing, as the active ingredient, rasagiline mesylate equivalent to 0.5 mg of rasagiline base. AZILECT 1 mg Tablets: White to off-white, round, flat, beveled tablets, debossed with “GIL 1” on one side and plain on the other side containing, as the active ingredient, rasagiline mesylate equivalent to 1 mg of rasagiline base. •AZILECT 0.5 mg tablets (containing, as the active ingredient, rasagiline mesylate equivalent to 0.5 mg of rasagiline base) (3) •AZILECT 1 mg tablets (containing, as the active ingredient, rasagiline mesylate equivalent to 1 mg of rasagiline base) (3)
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS AZILECT is contraindicated for use with meperidine, tramadol, methadone, propoxyphene and MAO inhibitors (MAOIs), including other selective MAO-B inhibitors, because of risk of serotonin syndrome [See Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. At least 14 days should elapse between discontinuation of AZILECT and initiation of treatment with these medications. AZILECT is contraindicated for use with St. John’s wort and with cyclobenzaprine. AZILECT is contraindicated for use with dextromethorphan because of risk of episode of psychosis or bizarre behavior. Concomitant use of meperidine, tramadol, methadone, propoxyphene dextromethorphan, St. John’s wort, cyclobenzaprine, or another (selective or non-selective) MAO inhibitor (4)
5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS •May cause hypertension (including severe hypertensive syndromes) at recommended doses (5.1) •May cause serotonin syndrome when used with antidepressants (5.2) •May cause falling asleep during activities of daily living, daytime drowsiness, and somnolence (5.3) •May cause hypotension, especially orthostatic (5.6) •May cause or exacerbate dyskinesia. Decreasing the levodopa dose may lessen or eliminate this side effect (5.7) •May cause hallucinations and psychotic-like behavior (5.8) •May cause impulse control/compulsive behaviors (5.9) •May cause withdrawal-emergent hyperpyrexia and confusion (5.10) •Increased risk of melanoma: monitor patients for melanoma on a regular basis (5.11) 5.1 Hypertension Exacerbation of hypertension may occur during treatment with AZILECT. Medication adjustment may be necessary if elevation of blood pressure is sustained. Monitor patients for new onset hypertension or hypertension that is not adequately controlled after starting AZILECT. In Study 3, AZILECT (1 mg/day) given in conjunction with levodopa, produced an increased incidence of significant blood pressure elevation (systolic > 180 or diastolic > 100 mm Hg) of 4% compared to 3% for placebo [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. When used as an adjunct to levodopa (Studies 3 and 4), the risk for developing post-treatment high blood pressure (e.g., systolic > 180 or diastolic >100 mm Hg) combined with a significant increase from baseline (e.g., systolic > 30 or diastolic > 20 mm Hg) was higher for AZILECT (2%) compared to placebo (1%). Dietary tyramine restriction is not required during treatment with recommended doses of AZILECT. However, certain foods that may contain very high amounts (i.e., more than 150 mg) of tyramine that could potentially cause severe hypertension because of tyramine interaction (including various clinical syndromes referred to as hypertensive urgency, crisis, or emergency) in patients taking AZILECT, even at the recommended doses, due to increased sensitivity to tyramine. Patients should be advised to avoid foods containing a very large amount of tyramine while taking recommended doses of AZILECT because of the potential for large increases in blood pressure including clinical syndromes referred to as hypertensive urgency, crisis, or emergency. AZILECT is a selective inhibitor of MAO-B at the recommended doses of 0.5 or 1 mg daily. Selectivity for inhibiting MAO-B diminishes in a dose-related manner as the dose is progressively increased above the recommended daily doses. 5.2 Serotonin Syndrome Serotonin syndrome has been reported with concomitant use of an antidepressant (e.g., selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors-SSRIs, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors-SNRIs, tricyclic antidepressants, tetracyclic antidepressants, triazolopyridine antidepressants) and a nonselective MAOI (e.g., phenelzine, tranylcypromine) or selective MAO-B inhibitors, such as selegiline (Eldepryl) and rasagiline (AZILECT). Serotonin syndrome has also been reported with concomitant use of AZILECT with meperidine, tramadol, methadone, or propoxyphene. AZILECT is contraindicated for use with meperidine, tramadol, methadone, propoxyphene and MAO inhibitors (MAOIs), including other selective MAO-B inhibitors [see Contraindications ( 4 ) and Drug Interactions ( 7.1 , 7.2 , 7.3 )]. In the postmarketing period, potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome has been reported in patients treated with antidepressants concomitantly with AZILECT. Concomitant use of AZILECT with one of many classes of antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs, SNRIs, triazolopyridine, tricyclic or tetracyclic antidepressants) is not recommended [see Drug Interactions ( 7.5 )] . The symptoms of serotonin syndrome have included behavioral and cognitive/mental status changes (e.g., confusion, hypomania, hallucinations, agitation, delirium, headache, and coma), autonomic effects (e.g., syncope, shivering, sweating, high fever/hyperthermia, hypertension, tachycardia, nausea, diarrhea), and somatic effects (e.g., muscular rigidity, myoclonus, muscle twitching, hyperreflexia manifested by clonus, and tremor). Serotonin syndrome can result in death. AZILECT clinical trials did not allow concomitant use of fluoxetine or fluvoxamine with AZILECT, and the potential drug interaction between AZILECT and antidepressants has not been studied systematically. Although a small number of AZILECT-treated patients were concomitantly exposed to antidepressants (tricyclics n=115; SSRIs n=141), the exposure, both in dose and number of subjects, was not adequate to rule out the possibility of an untoward reaction from combining these agents. At least 14 days should elapse between discontinuation of AZILECT and initiation of treatment with a SSRI, SNRI, tricyclic, tetracyclic, or triazolopyridine antidepressant. Because of the long half-lives of certain antidepressants (e.g., fluoxetine and its active metabolite), at least five weeks (perhaps longer, especially if fluoxetine has been prescribed chronically and/or at higher doses) should elapse between discontinuation of fluoxetine and initiation of AZILECT [see Drug Interactions (7.5)]. 5.3 Falling Asleep During Activities of Daily Living and Somnolence It has been reported that falling asleep while engaged in activities of daily living always occurs in a setting of preexisting somnolence, although patients may not give such a history. For this reason, prescribers should monitor patients for drowsiness or sleepiness, because some of the events occur well after initiation of treatment with dopaminergic medication. Prescribers should also be aware that patients may not acknowledge drowsiness or sleepiness until directly questioned about drowsiness or sleepiness during specific activities. Cases of patients treated with AZILECT and other dopaminergic medications have reported falling asleep while engaged in activities of daily living including the operation of motor vehicles, which sometimes resulted in accidents. Although many of these patients reported somnolence while on AZILECT with other dopaminergic medications, some perceived that they had no warning signs, such as excessive drowsiness, and believed that they were alert immediately prior to the event. Some of these events have been reported more than 1-year after initiation of treatment. In Study 3, somnolence was a common occurrence in patients receiving AZILECT and was more frequent in patients with Parkinson’s disease receiving AZILECT than in respective patients receiving placebo (6% AZILECT compared to 4% Placebo) [see Adverse Reactions ( 6.1 )] . Before initiating treatment with AZILECT, patients should be advised of the potential to develop drowsiness and specifically asked about factors that may increase the risk with AZILECT such as concomitant sedating medications, the presence of sleep disorders, and concomitant medications that increase rasagiline plasma levels (e.g., ciprofloxacin) [see Drug Interactions ( 7.6 )] . If a patient develops significant daytime sleepiness or episodes of falling asleep during activities that require active participation (e.g., driving a motor vehicle, conversations, eating), AZILECT should ordinarily be discontinued. If a decision is made to continue these patients on AZILECT, advise them to avoid driving and other potentially dangerous activities. There is insufficient information to establish that dose reduction will eliminate episodes of falling asleep while engaged in activities of daily living. 5.4 Ciprofloxacin or Other CYP1A2 Inhibitors Rasagiline plasma concentrations may increase up to 2 fold in patients using concomitant ciprofloxacin and other CYP1A2 inhibitors. Patients taking concomitant ciprofloxacin or other CYP1A2 inhibitors should not exceed a dose of AZILECT 0.5 mg once daily [see Dosage and Administration (2.2), Drug Interactions (7.6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 5.5 Hepatic Impairment Rasagiline plasma concentration may increase in patients with hepatic impairment. Patients with mild hepatic impairment should be given the dose of AZILECT 0.5 mg once daily. AZILECT should not be used in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment [see Dosage and Administration (2.3) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 5.6 Hypotension / Orthostatic Hypotension In Study 3, the incidence of orthostatic hypotension consisting of a systolic blood pressure decrease (≥ 30 mm Hg) or a diastolic blood pressure decrease (> 20 mm Hg) after standing was 13% with AZILECT (1 mg/day) compared to 9% with placebo [see Adverse Reactions ( 6.1 )] . At the 1 mg dose, the frequency of orthostatic hypotension (at any time during the study) was approximately 44% for AZILECT vs 33% for placebo for mild to moderate systolic blood pressure decrements (> 20 mm Hg), 40% for AZILECT vs 33% for placebo for mild to moderate diastolic blood pressure decrements (> 10 mm Hg), 7% for AZILECT vs 3% for placebo for severe systolic blood pressure decrements (> 40 mm Hg), and 9% for AZILECT vs 6% for placebo for severe diastolic blood pressure decrements (≥ 20 mm Hg). There was also an increased risk for some of these abnormalities at the lower 0.5 mg daily dose and for an individual patient having mild to moderate or severe orthostatic hypotension for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In Study 2 where AZILECT was given as an adjunct therapy in patients not taking concomitant levodopa, there were 5 reports of orthostatic hypotension in patients taking AZILECT 1 mg (3.1%) and 1 report in patients taking placebo (0.6%) [see Adverse Reactions ( 6.1 )] . Clinical trial data further suggest that orthostatic hypotension occurs most frequently in the first two months of AZILECT treatment and tends to decrease over time. Some patients treated with AZILECT experienced a mildly increased risk for significant decreases in blood pressure unrelated to standing but while supine. The risk for post-treatment hypotension (e.g., systolic < 90 or diastolic < 50 mm Hg) combined with a significant decrease from baseline (e.g., systolic > 30 or diastolic > 20 mm Hg) was higher for AZILECT 1 mg (3.2%) compared to placebo (1.3%). There was no clear increased risk for lowering of blood pressure or postural hypotension associated with AZILECT 1 mg/day as monotherapy. When used as an adjunct to levodopa, postural hypotension was also reported as an adverse reaction in approximately 6% of patients treated with AZILECT 0.5 mg, 9% of patients treated with AZILECT 1 mg and 3% of patients treated with placebo. Postural hypotension led to drug discontinuation and premature withdrawal from clinical trials in one (0.7%) patient treated with AZILECT 1 mg/day, no patients treated with AZILECT 0.5 mg/day and no placebo-treated patients. 5.7 Dyskinesia When used as an adjunct to levodopa, AZILECT may cause dyskinesia or potentiate dopaminergic side effects and exacerbate pre-existing dyskinesia. In Study 3, the incidence of dyskinesia was 18% for patients treated with 0.5 mg or 1 mg AZILECT as an adjunct to levodopa and 10% for patients treated with placebo as an adjunct to levodopa. Decreasing the dose of levodopa may mitigate this side effect [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. 5.8 Hallucinations / Psychotic-Like Behavior In the monotherapy study (Study 1), the incidence of hallucinations reported as an adverse event was 1.3% in patients treated with AZILECT 1 mg and 0.7% in patients treated with placebo. In Study 1, the incidence of hallucinations reported as an adverse reaction and leading to drug discontinuation and premature withdrawal was 1.3% in patients treated with AZILECT 1 mg and 0% in placebo-treated patients. When studied as an adjunct therapy without levodopa (Study 2), hallucinations were reported as an adverse reaction in 1.2% of patients treated with 1 mg/day AZILECT and 1.8% of patients treated with placebo. Hallucinations led to drug discontinuation and premature withdrawal from the clinical trial in 0.6% of patients treated with AZILECT 1 mg/day and in none of the placebo-treated patients. When studied as an adjunct to levodopa (Study 3), the incidence of hallucinations was approximately 5% in patients treated with AZILECT 0.5 mg/day, 4% in patients treated with AZILECT 1 mg/day, and 3% in patients treated with placebo. The incidence of hallucinations leading to drug discontinuation and premature withdrawal was about 1% in patients treated with 0.5 mg AZILECT and 1 mg AZILECT/day, and 0% in placebo-treated patients [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Postmarketing reports indicate that patients may experience new or worsening mental status and behavioral changes, which may be severe, including psychotic-like behavior during treatment with AZILECT or after starting or increasing the dose of AZILECT. Other drugs prescribed to improve the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can have similar effects on thinking and behavior. This abnormal thinking and behavior can consist of one or more of a variety of manifestations including paranoid ideation, delusions, hallucinations, confusion, psychotic-like behavior, disorientation, aggressive behavior, agitation, and delirium. Patients should be informed of the possibility of developing hallucinations and instructed to report them to their health care provider promptly should they develop. Patients with a major psychotic disorder should ordinarily not be treated with AZILECT because of the risk of exacerbating the psychosis with an increase in central dopaminergic tone. In addition, many treatments for psychosis that decrease central dopaminergic tone may decrease the effectiveness of AZILECT [see Drug Interactions (7.8)]. Consider dose reduction or stopping the medication if a patient develops hallucinations or psychotic like behaviors while taking AZILECT. 5.9 Impulse Control / Compulsive Behaviors Case reports suggest that patients can experience intense urges to gamble, increased sexual urges, intense urges to spend money, binge eating, and/or other intense urges, and the inability to control these urges while taking one or more of the medications, including AZILECT, that increase central dopaminergic tone and that are generally used for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. In some cases, although not all, these urges were reported to have stopped when the dose was reduced or the medication was discontinued. Because patients may not recognize these behaviors as abnormal, it is important for prescribers to specifically ask patients or their caregivers about the development of new or increased gambling urges, sexual urges, uncontrolled spending or other urges while being treated with AZILECT. Consider dose reduction or stopping the medication if a patient develops such urges while taking AZILECT. 5.10 Withdrawal-Emergent Hyperpyrexia and Confusion A symptom complex resembling neuroleptic malignant syndrome (characterized by elevated temperature, muscular rigidity, altered consciousness, and autonomic instability), with no other obvious etiology, has been reported in association with rapid dose reduction, withdrawal of, or changes in drugs that increase central dopaminergic tone. 5.11 Melanoma Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with Parkinson’s disease have a higher risk (2- to approximately 6-fold higher) of developing melanoma than the general population. Whether the increased risk observed was due to Parkinson’s disease or other factors, such as drugs used to treat Parkinson’s disease, is unclear. For the reasons stated above, patients and providers are advised to monitor for melanomas frequently and on a regular basis. Ideally, periodic skin examinations should be performed by appropriately qualified individuals (e.g., dermatologists).
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following adverse reactions are described in more detail in the Warnings and Precautions section of the label: •Hypertension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Serotonin Syndrome [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] •Falling Asleep During Activities of Daily Living and Somnolence [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] •Hypotension / Orthostatic Hypotension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)] •Dyskinesia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)] •Hallucinations / Psychotic-Like Behavior [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)] •Impulse Control /Compulsive Behaviors [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)] •Withdrawal-Emergent Hyperpyrexia and Confusion [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10)] •Melanoma [see Warnings and Precautions (5.11)] Most common adverse reactions (incidence 3% or greater than placebo): AZILECT monotherapy: flu syndrome, arthralgia, depression, dyspepsia (6.1) AZILECT used as adjunct without levodopa: peripheral edema, fall, arthralgia, cough, and insomnia (6.1) AZILECT used as adjunct to levodopa: dyskinesia, accidental injury, weight loss, postural hypotension, vomiting, anorexia, arthralgia, abdominal pain, nausea, constipation, dry mouth, rash, abnormal dreams, fall, and tenosynovitis (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact TEVA at 1-800-221-4026 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to the incidence of adverse reactions in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates of adverse reactions observed in practice. During the clinical development of AZILECT, Parkinson’s disease patients received AZILECT as initial monotherapy (Study 1) and as adjunct therapy (Study 2, Study 3, Study 4). As the populations in these studies differ, not only in the adjunct use of dopamine agonists or levodopa during AZILECT treatment, but also in the severity and duration of their disease, the adverse reactions are presented separately for each study. Monotherapy Use of AZILECT In Study 1, approximately 5% of the 149 patients treated with AZILECT discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions compared to 2% of the 151 patients who received placebo. The only adverse reaction that led to the discontinuation of more than one patient was hallucinations. The most commonly observed adverse reactions in Study 1 (incidence in AZILECT-treated patients 3% or greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients) included flu syndrome, arthralgia, depression, and dyspepsia. Table 1 lists adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or greater of patients receiving AZILECT as monotherapy and were numerically more frequent than in the placebo group in Study 1. Table 1: Adverse Reactions* in Study 1 AZILECT 1 mg (N=149) Placebo (N=151) % of Patients % of Patients Headache 14 12 Arthralgia 7 4 Dyspepsia 7 4 Depression 5 2 Fall 5 3 Flu syndrome 5 1 Conjunctivitis 3 1 Fever 3 1 Gastroenteritis 3 1 Rhinitis 3 1 Arthritis 2 1 Ecchymosis 2 0 Malaise 2 0 Neck Pain 2 0 Paresthesia 2 1 Vertigo 2 1 *Incidence 2% or greater in AZILECT 1 mg group and numerically more frequent than in placebo group There were no significant differences in the safety profile based on age or gender. Adjunct Use of AZILECT AZILECT was studied as an adjunct therapy without levodopa (Study 2), or as an adjunct therapy to levodopa, with some patients also taking dopamine agonists, COMT inhibitors, anticholinergics, or amantadine (Study 3 and Study 4). In Study 2, approximately 8% of the 162 patients treated with AZILECT discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions compared to 4% of the 164 patients who received placebo. Adverse reactions that led to the discontinuation of more than one patient were nausea and dizziness. The most commonly observed adverse reactions in Study 2 (incidence in AZILECT-treated patients 3% or greater than incidence in placebo-treated patients) included peripheral edema, fall, arthralgia, cough, and insomnia. Table 2 lists adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or greater in patients receiving AZILECT as adjunct therapy without levodopa and numerically more frequent than in the placebo group in Study 2. Table 2: Adverse Reactions* in Study 2 AZILECT 1 mg (N=162) Placebo (N=164) % of Patients % of Patients Dizziness 7 6 Peripheral edema 7 4 Headache 6 4 Nausea 6 4 Fall 6 1 Arthralgia 5 2 Back pain 4 3 Cough 4 1 Insomnia 4 1 Upper respiratory tract infection 4 2 Orthostatic hypotension 3 1 *Incidence 2% or greater in AZILECT 1 mg group and numerically more frequent than in placebo group There were no significant differences in the safety profile based on age or gender. In Study 3, adverse event reporting was considered more reliable than Study 4; therefore, only the adverse event data from Study 3 are presented below. In Study 3, approximately 9% of the 164 patients treated with AZILECT 0.5 mg/day and 7% of the 149 patients treated with AZILECT 1 mg/day discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions, compared to 6% of the 159 patients who received placebo. The adverse reactions that led to discontinuation of more than one AZILECT-treated patient were diarrhea, weight loss, hallucination, and rash. The most commonly observed adverse reactions in Study 3 (incidence in AZILECT-treated patients 3% or greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients) included dyskinesia, accidental injury, weight loss, postural hypotension, vomiting, anorexia, arthralgia, abdominal pain, nausea, constipation, dry mouth, rash, abnormal dreams, fall and tenosynovitis. Table 3 lists adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or greater of patients treated with AZILECT 1 mg/day and that were numerically more frequent than the placebo group in Study 3. Table 3: Adverse Reactions* in Study 3 AZILECT 1 mg (N=149) AZILECT 0.5 mg (N=164) Placebo (N=159) % of patients % of patients % of patients Dyskinesia 18 18 10 Accidental injury 12 8 5 Nausea 12 10 8 Headache 11 8 10 Fall 11 12 8 Weight loss 9 2 3 Constipation 9 4 5 Postural hypotension 9 6 3 Arthralgia 8 6 4 Vomiting 7 4 1 Dry mouth 6 2 3 Rash 6 3 3 Somnolence 6 4 4 Abdominal pain 5 2 1 Anorexia 5 2 1 Diarrhea 5 7 4 Ecchymosis 5 2 3 Dyspepsia 5 4 4 Paresthesia 5 2 3 Abnormal dreams 4 1 1 Hallucinations 4 5 3 Ataxia 3 6 1 Dyspnea 3 5 2 Infection 3 2 2 Neck pain 3 1 1 Sweating 3 2 1 Tenosynovitis 3 1 0 Dystonia 3 2 1 Gingivitis 2 1 1 Hemorrhage 2 1 1 Hernia 2 1 1 Myasthenia 2 2 1 *Incidence 2% or greater in AZILECT 1 mg group and numerically more frequent than in placebo group Several of the more common adverse reactions seemed dose-related, including weight loss, postural hypotension, and dry mouth. There were no significant differences in the safety profile based on age or gender. During all Parkinson’s disease phase 2/3 clinical trials, the long-term safety profile was similar to that observed with shorter duration exposure.
7 DRUG INTERACTIONS •Meperidine: Risk of serotonin syndrome (4, 7.1) •Dextromethorphan: Risk of psychosis or bizarre behavior (4, 7.2) •MAO inhibitors: Risk of non-selective MAO inhibition and hypertensive crisis (4, 7.3) 7.1 Meperidine Serious, sometimes fatal reactions have been precipitated with concomitant use of meperidine (e.g., Demerol and other tradenames) and MAO inhibitors including selective MAO-B inhibitors [see Contraindications (4)]. 7.2 Dextromethorphan The concomitant use of AZILECT and dextromethorphan was not allowed in clinical studies. The combination of MAO inhibitors and dextromethorphan has been reported to cause brief episodes of psychosis or bizarre behavior. Therefore, in view of AZILECT’s MAO inhibitory activity, dextromethorphan is contraindicated for use with AZILECT [see Contraindications (4)]. 7.3 MAO Inhibitors AZILECT is contraindicated for use with other MAO inhibitors because of the increased risk of nonselective MAO inhibition that may lead to a hypertensive crisis [see Contraindications (4)]. 7.4 Sympathomimetic Medications The concomitant use of AZILECT and sympathomimetic medications was not allowed in clinical studies. Severe hypertensive reactions have followed the administration of sympathomimetics and nonselective MAO inhibitors. Hypertensive crisis has been reported in patients taking the recommended dose of AZILECT and sympathomimetic medications. Severe hypertension has been reported in patients taking the recommended dose of AZILECT and ophthalmic drops containing sympathomimetic medications. Because AZILECT is a selective MAOI, hypertensive reactions are not ordinarily expected with the concomitant use of sympathomimetic medications. Nevertheless, caution should be exercised when concomitantly using recommended doses of AZILECT with any sympathomimetic medications including nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold remedies. 7.5 Antidepressants Concomitant use of AZILECT with one of many classes of antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs, SNRIs, triazolopyridine, tricyclic or tetracyclic antidepressants) is not recommended [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Concomitant use of AZILECT and MAO inhibitors is contraindicated [see Contraindications (4)]. 7.6 Ciprofloxacin or Other CYP1A2 Inhibitors Rasagiline plasma concentrations may increase up to 2 fold in patients using concomitant ciprofloxacin and other CYP1A2 inhibitors. This could result in increased adverse events. Patients taking concomitant ciprofloxacin or other CYP1A2 inhibitors should not exceed a dose of AZILECT 0.5 mg once daily [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.7 Tyramine/Rasagiline Interaction MAO in the gastrointestinal tract and liver (primarily type A) provides protection from exogenous amines (e.g., tyramine) that have the capacity, if absorbed intact, to cause a tyramine reaction with hypertension including clinical syndromes referred to as hypertensive urgency, crisis, or emergency. Foods and medications containing large amounts of exogenous amines (e.g., from fermented cheese, herring, over-the-counter cough/cold medications) may cause release of norepinephrine resulting in a rise in systemic blood pressure. Results of a special tyramine challenge study indicate that rasagiline is selective for MAO-B at recommended doses and can be used without dietary tyramine restriction. However, certain foods may contain very high amounts (i.e., 150 mg or greater) of tyramine and could potentially cause a hypertensive reaction in individual patients taking AZILECT due to increased sensitivity to tyramine. Selectivity for inhibiting MAO-B diminishes in a dose-related manner as the dose is progressively increased above the recommended daily doses. There were no cases of hypertensive crisis in the clinical development program associated with 1 mg daily AZILECT treatment, in which most patients did not follow dietary tyramine restriction. There have been postmarketing reports of patients who experienced significantly elevated blood pressure (including rare cases of hypertensive crisis) after ingestion of unknown amounts of tyramine-rich foods while taking recommended doses of AZILECT. Patients should be advised to avoid foods containing a very large amount of tyramine while taking recommended doses of AZILECT [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. 7.8 Dopaminergic Antagonists It is possible that dopamine antagonists, such as antipsychotics or metoclopramide, could diminish the effectiveness of AZILECT.
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS •Pregnancy: Based on animal data, may cause fetal harm. Do not use AZILECT unless the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus (8.1) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of rasagiline in pregnant women. AZILECT should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. In a combined mating/fertility and embryo-fetal development study in pregnant rats, no effect on embryo-fetal development was observed at oral doses up to 3 mg/kg/day (approximately 30 times the plasma exposure (AUC) in humans at the maximum recommended human dose [MRHD, 1 mg/day]). In pregnant rabbits administered rasagiline throughout the period of organogenesis at oral doses of up to 36 mg/kg/day, no developmental toxicity was observed. At the highest dose tested, the plasma AUC was approximately 800 times that in humans at the MRHD. In pregnant rats administered rasagiline (0.1, 0.3, 1 mg/kg/day) orally during gestation and lactation, offspring survival was decreased and offspring body weight was reduced at 0.3 mg/kg/day and 1 mg/kg/day (10 and 16 times the plasma AUC in humans at the MRHD). No plasma data were available at the no-effect dose (0.1 mg/kg); however, that dose is similar to the MRHD on a mg/m2 basis. The effect of rasagiline on physical and behavioral development was not adequately assessed in this study. Rasagiline may be given as an adjunct therapy to levodopa/carbidopa treatment. In pregnant rats administered rasagiline (0.1, 0.3, 1 mg/kg/day) and levodopa/carbidopa (80/20 mg/kg/day) (alone and in combination) orally throughout the period of organogenesis, there was an increased incidence of wavy ribs in fetuses from rats treated with rasagiline in combination with levodopa/carbidopa at 1/80/20 mg/kg/day (approximately 8 times the rasagiline plasma AUC in humans at the MRHD and similar to the MRHD of levodopa/carbidopa [800/200 mg/day] on a mg/m2 basis). In pregnant rabbits dosed orally throughout the period of organogenesis with rasagiline alone (3 mg/kg) or in combination with levodopa/carbidopa (rasagiline: 0.1, 0.6, 1.2 mg/kg, levodopa/carbidopa: 80/20 mg/kg/day), an increase in embryo-fetal death was noted at rasagiline doses of 0.6 and 1.2 mg/kg/day when administered in combination with levodopa/carbidopa (approximately 7 and 13 times, respectively, the rasagiline plasma AUC in humans at the MRHD). There was an increase in cardiovascular abnormalities with levodopa/carbidopa alone (similar to the MRHD on a mg/m2 basis) and to a greater extent when rasagiline (at all doses; 1-13 times the rasagiline plasma AUC in humans at the MRHD) was administered in combination with levodopa/carbidopa. 8.3 Nursing Mothers In rats rasagiline was shown to inhibit prolactin secretion and it may inhibit milk secretion in humans. It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when AZILECT is administered to a nursing woman. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Approximately half of patients in clinical trials were 65 years and over. There were no significant differences in the safety profile of the geriatric and nongeriatric patients. 8.6 Hepatic Impairment Rasagiline plasma concentration may be increased in patients with mild (up to 2 fold, Child-Pugh score 5-6), moderate (up to 7 fold, Child-Pugh score 7-9), and severe (Child-Pugh score 10-15) hepatic impairment. Patients with mild hepatic impairment should not exceed a dose of 0.5 mg/day. AZILECT should not be used in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment [see Dosage and Administration (2.3), Warnings and Precautions (5.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.7 Renal Impairment Dose adjustment of AZILECT is not required for patients with mild or moderate renal impairment because AZILECT plasma concentrations are not increased in patients with moderate renal impairment. Rasagiline has not been studied in patients with severe renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Save on the cost of Azilect

With Our Azilect Discount Card

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Medication Discount Card Medication Discount Card
Frequently Asked Questions

There are no catches to this. Simply print the card, take it to your pharmacy, and save. If you still have questions just read below...

How Do I Know My Pharmacy Will Accept It?
That's simple. The card is accepted at ALL CHAIN PHARMACIES such as CVS, Rite Aid, and Walgreens. If you don't know if your pharmacy accepts the card simply call them and give them the BIN and PCN numbers on the card. The card is accepted at most pharmacies. If you call a few one is sure to accept it.
Can I Use This In Conjunction With My Insurance?
No, unfortunately insurance companies don't allow "double-savings". However, if your insurance does not cover certain drugs (ex - cosmetic drugs, brand names, prenatal vitamins, etc) then this card may save you money. Also if your insurance requires you to pay a deductible on your brand name drugs before covering them, then this card may also provider greater savings!
How Much Will This Card Save Me?
You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
This Sounds Too Good To Be True. Is This A Scam?
Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
My Pharmacy Isn't Included. Can They Participate?
Yes! There are pharmacies who accept the pharmacy savings card that are not on our list. If you find one please email us and we'll update the list. If they are not a current partner and are interested, email us and we'll contact them to try and convince them to participate. You may also choose to call around and see if someone else in your area accepts it.
Is this the same as an Azilect copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
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Savings of over 50%!
I had printed out 3 different discount cards on the internet and asked the pharmacist to check prices. The lowest price was $289. I searched the internet some more, I found this site, gave the pharmacy your card and the cost was $130. What a big savings, I can't thank this site enough. - Linda S.

Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

Accepted At Over 59,000 Pharmacies Nationwide!

Including...
  • Including...
  • Cub Pharmacy
  • Kmart
  • HEB
  • Target
  • Winn Dixie
  • Costco
  • Safeway
  • Kroger
  • Tom Thumb
  • CVS
  • Brookshire`s
  • Rite Aid
  • Fred`s Pharmacy
  • Walmart
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  • Walgreens
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And thousands of independent pharmacies nationwide!

Azilect Coupon

Currently we do not have any available, however you can receive an instant discount at your pharmacy with our Azilect discount card. Create one instantly

Important Note

The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

This Azilect discount should not be confused with an Azilect coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

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"Thank you SO MUCH! My patients have saved so much money using these cards." - Danielle
Primary Care Coalition
primarycarecoalition.org
Save up to 75% on your medication
Save up to 75% on your medication