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Takeda offers a coupon for Colcrys

Title: Colcrys Co-Pay Assistance Card
Manufacturer: Takeda
Phone Number: 1-866-279-5630
Link to Program: https://www.colcrys.com/resources/colcrys-savings/
Instructions: Check the eligibility requirements to make sure you qualify, then answer a few short questions and download and print the card to take with you to the pharmacy along with your Rx.
Maximum Savings: Pay as little as $15 for their Colcrys prescription. There is a maximum savings of $75 per prescription.
Is Insurance Required? No

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Colcrys Prescribing Information

This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Colcrys safely and effectively. Before taking Colcrys please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Colcrys.

Indications And Usage

COLCRYS (colchicine, USP) tablets are an alkaloid indicated for: Prophylaxis and Treatment of Gout Flares in adults (1.1). Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in adults and children 4 years or older (1.2). COLCRYS is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes. 1.1 Gout Flares COLCRYS® (colchicine, USP) tablets are indicated for prophylaxis and the treatment of acute gout flares. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: COLCRYS is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares. Treatment of Gout Flares: COLCRYS tablets are indicated for treatment of acute gout flares when taken at the first sign of a flare. 1.2 Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) COLCRYS® (colchicine, USP) tablets are indicated in adults and children 4 years or older for treatment of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).

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Dosage And Administration

Table 1 COLCRYS Dose Adjustment for Co-administration with Interacting Drugs if no Alternative AvailableFor magnitude of effect on colchicine plasma concentrations [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) ]
Strong CYP3A4 InhibitorsPatients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given COLCRYS in conjunction with strong CYP3A4 or P-gp inhibitors [see CONTRAINDICATIONS (4) ].
Drug Noted or Anticipated Outcome Gout Flares FMF
Prophylaxis of Gout Flares Treatment of Gout Flares
Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose
Atazanavir Clarithromycin Darunavir/ RitonavirWhen used in combination with Ritonavir, see dosing recommendations for strong CYP3A4 inhibitors [see CONTRAINDICATIONS (4) ]. Indinavir Itraconazole Ketoconazole Lopinavir/ Ritonavir Nefazodone Nelfinavir Ritonavir Saquinavir Telithromycin Tipranavir/ Ritonavir Significant increase in colchicine plasma levels; fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with clarithromycin, a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Similarly, significant increase in colchicine plasma levels is anticipated with other strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. 0.6 mg twice a day 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg once a day 0.3 mg once every other day 1.2 mg (2 tablets) followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. 0.6 mg (1 tablet) × 1 dose, followed by 0.3 mg (1/2 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 – 2.4 mg Maximum daily dose of 0.6 mg (may be given as 0.3 mg twice a day)
Moderate CYP3A4 Inhibitors
Drug Noted or Anticipated Outcome Gout Flares FMF
Prophylaxis of Gout Flares Treatment of Gout Flares
Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose
Amprenavir Aprepitant Diltiazem Erythromycin Fluconazole Fosamprenavir (pro-drug of Amprenavir) Grapefruit Juice Verapamil Significant increase in colchicine plasma concentration is anticipated. Neuromuscular toxicity has been reported with diltiazem and verapamil interactions. 0.6 mg twice a day 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg twice a day or 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg once a day 1.2 mg (2 tablets) followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. 1.2 mg (2 tablets) × 1 dose. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 – 2.4 mg. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 mg (may be given as 0.6 mg twice a day)
P-gp Inhibitors
Drug Noted or Anticipated Outcome Gout Flares FMF
Prophylaxis of Gout Flares Treatment of Gout Flares
Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose
Cyclosporine Ranolazine Significant increase in colchicine plasma levels; fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with cyclosporine, a P-gp inhibitor. Similarly, significant increase in colchicine plasma levels is anticipated with other P-gp inhibitors. 0.6 mg twice a day 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg once a day 0.3 mg once every other day 1.2 mg (2 tablets) followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. 0.6 mg (1 tablet) × 1 dose. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 – 2.4 mg Maximum daily dose of 0.6 mg (may be given as 0.3 mg twice a day)

Dosage Forms And Strengths

0.6 mg tablets — purple capsule-shaped, film-coated with AR 374 debossed on one side and scored on the other side. 0.6 mg tablets (3).

Contraindications

Patients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given COLCRYS in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (this includes all protease inhibitors, except fosamprenavir). In these patients, life-threatening and fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with colchicine taken in therapeutic doses. Patients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given COLCRYS in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (5.3). In these patients, life-threatening and fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with colchicine taken in therapeutic doses (7).

Warning and Cautions

Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep COLCRYS out of the reach of children (5.1, 10). Blood dyscrasias: myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported (5.2). Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine (5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 6, 10). Drug interaction P-gp and/or CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with P-gp and/or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death (5.3, 7). Neuromuscular toxicity: Myotoxicity including rhabdomyolysis may occur, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of COLCRYS (5.4, 7). 5.1 Fatal Overdose Fatal overdoses, both accidental and intentional, have been reported in adults and children who have ingested colchicine [see OVERDOSAGE (10) ]. COLCRYS should be kept out of the reach of children. 5.2 Blood Dyscrasias Myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses. 5.3 Drug Interactions Colchicine is a P-gp and CYP3A4 substrate. Life-threatening and fatal drug interactions have been reported in patients treated with colchicine given with P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. If treatment with a P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitor is required in patients with normal renal and hepatic function, the patient's dose of colchicine may need to be reduced or interrupted [see DRUG INTERACTIONS (7) ]. Use of COLCRYS in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (this includes all protease inhibitors, except fosamprenavir) is contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment [see CONTRAINDICATIONS (4) ]. 5.4 Neuromuscular Toxicity Colchicine-induced neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis have been reported with chronic treatment in therapeutic doses. Patients with renal dysfunction and elderly patients, even those with normal renal and hepatic function, are at increased risk. Concomitant use of atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, or benzafibrate (themselves associated with myotoxicity) or cyclosporine with COLCRYS may potentiate the development of myopathy [see DRUG INTERACTIONS (7) ]. Once colchicine is stopped, the symptoms generally resolve within 1 week to several months.

Adverse Reactions

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: The most commonly reported adverse reaction in clinical trials for the prophylaxis of gout was diarrhea. Treatment of Gout Flares: The most common adverse reactions reported in the clinical trial for gout were diarrhea (23%) and pharyngolaryngeal pain (3%). FMF: Most common adverse reactions (up to 20%) are abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. These effects are usually mild, transient, and reversible upon lowering the dose (6). To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Mutual Pharmaceutical Company, Inc. at 1-888-351-3786 or drugsafety@urlpharma.com or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: The most commonly reported adverse reaction in clinical trials of colchicine for the prophylaxis of gout was diarrhea. Treatment of Gout Flares: The most common adverse reactions reported in the clinical trial with COLCRYS for treatment of gout flares were diarrhea (23%) and pharyngolaryngeal pain (3%). FMF: Gastrointestinal tract adverse effects are the most frequent side effects in patients initiating COLCRYS, usually presenting within 24 hours, and occurring in up to 20% of patients given therapeutic doses. Typical symptoms include cramping, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting. These events should be viewed as dose-limiting if severe as they can herald the onset of more significant toxicity. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience in Gout Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying and controlled conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug, and may not predict the rates observed in a broader patient population in clinical practice. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with a gout flare, gastrointestinal adverse reactions occurred in 26% of patients using the recommended dose (1.8 mg over 1 hour) of COLCRYS compared to 77% of patients taking a non-recommended high-dose (4.8 mg over 6 hours) of colchicine and 20% of patients taking placebo. Diarrhea was the most commonly reported drug-related gastrointestinal adverse event. As shown in Table 3, diarrhea is associated with COLCRYS treatment. Diarrhea was more likely to occur in patients taking the high-dose regimen than the low-dose regimen. Severe diarrhea occurred in 19% and vomiting occurred in 17% of patients taking the non-recommended high-dose colchicine regimen but did not occur in the recommended low-dose COLCRYS regimen. Table 3 Number (%) of Patients with at Least One Drug-Related Treatment Emergent Adverse Events with an Incidence of ≥ 2% of Patients in Any Treatment Group MedDRA System Organ Class COLCRYS Dose Placebo MedDRA Preferred Term High (N=52) n (%) Low (N=74) n (%) (N=59) n (%) Number of Patients with at Least One Drug-Related TEAE 40 (77) 27 (37) 16 (27) Gastrointestinal Disorders 40 (77) 19 (26) 12 (20) Diarrhea 40 (77) 17 (23) 8 (14) Nausea 9 (17) 3 (4) 3 (5) Vomiting 9 (17) 0 0 Abdominal Discomfort 0 0 2 (3) General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions 4 (8) 1 (1) 1 (2) Fatigue 2 (4) 1 (1) 1 (2) Metabolic and Nutrition Disorders 0 3 (4) 2 (3) Gout 0 3 (4) 1 (2) Nervous System Disorders 1 (2) 1 (1.4) 2 (3) Headache 1 (2) 1 (1) 2 (3) Respiratory Thoracic Mediastinal Disorders 1 (2) 2 (3) 0 Pharyngolaryngeal Pain 1 (2) 2 (3) 0 6.2 Postmarketing Experience Serious toxic manifestations associated with colchicine include myelosuppression, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and injury to cells in the renal, hepatic, circulatory, and central nervous systems. These most often occur with excessive accumulation or overdosage [see OVERDOSAGE (10) ]. The following adverse reactions have been reported with colchicine. These have been generally reversible upon temporarily interrupting treatment or lowering the dose of colchicine. Neurological: sensory motor neuropathy Dermatological: alopecia, maculopapular rash, purpura, rash Digestive: abdominal cramping, abdominal pain, diarrhea, lactose intolerance, nausea, vomiting Hematological: leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, aplastic anemia Hepatobiliary: elevated AST, elevated ALT Musculoskeletal: myopathy, elevated CPK, myotonia, muscle weakness, muscle pain, rhabdomyolysis Reproductive: azoospermia, oligospermia

Drug Interactions

COLCRYS (colchicine) is a substrate of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Of the cytochrome P450 enzymes tested, CYP3A4 was mainly involved in the metabolism of colchicine. If COLCRYS is administered with drugs that inhibit P-gp, most of which also inhibit CYP3A4, increased concentrations of colchicine are likely. Fatal drug interactions have been reported. Physicians should ensure that patients are suitable candidates for treatment with COLCRYS and remain alert for signs and symptoms of toxicities related to increased colchicine exposure as a result of a drug interaction. Signs and symptoms of COLCRYS toxicity should be evaluated promptly and, if toxicity is suspected, COLCRYS should be discontinued immediately. Table 4 provides recommendations as a result of other potentially significant drug interactions. Table 1 provides recommendations for strong and moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors and P-gp inhibitors. Table 4 Other Potentially Significant Drug Interactions Concomitant Drug Class or Food Noted or anticipated Outcome Clinical Comment HMG-Co A Reductase Inhibitors: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, simvastatin Pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interaction: the addition of one drug to a stable long-term regimen of the other has resulted in myopathy and rhabdomyolysis (including a fatality) Weigh the potential benefits and risks and carefully monitor patients for any signs or symptoms of muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness, particularly during initial therapy; monitoring CPK (creatine phosphokinase) will not necessarily prevent the occurrence of severe myopathy. Other Lipid Lowering Drugs: fibrates, gemfibrozil Digitalis Glycosides: digoxin P-gp substrate; rhabdomyolysis has been reported Co-administration of P-gp and/or CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., clarithromycin or cyclosporine) have been demonstrated to alter the concentration of colchicine. The potential for drug-drug interactions must be considered prior to and during therapy. See full prescribing information for a complete list of reported and potential interactions (2.4, 5.3, 7).

Use In Specific Populations

In the presence of mild to moderate renal or hepatic impairment, adjustment of dosing is not required for treatment of gout flare, prophylaxis of gout flare, and FMF but patients should be monitored closely (2.5, 8.6). In patients with severe renal impairment for prophylaxis of gout flares the starting dose should be 0.3 mg/day, for gout flares no dose adjustment is required but a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. In FMF patients, start with 0.3 mg/day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring (2.5, 8.6). In patients with severe hepatic impairment, a dose reduction may be needed in prophylaxis of gout flares and FMF patients; while a dose reduction may not be needed in gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks (2.5, 2.6, 8.6, 8.7). For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for prophylaxis of gout flares should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring. For treatment of gout flares, the total recommended dose should be reduced to 0.6 mg (1 tablet) × 1 dose and the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every two weeks. For FMF patients the starting dose should be 0.3 mg per day and dosing can be increased with close monitoring (2.5, 8.6). Pregnancy: Use only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus (8.1). Nursing Mothers: Caution should be exercised when administered to a nursing woman (8.3). Geriatric Use: The recommended dose of colchicine should be based on renal function (2.5, 8.5). 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C There are no adequate and well-controlled studies with colchicine in pregnant women. Colchicine crosses the human placenta. While not studied in the treatment of gout flares, data from a limited number of published studies found no evidence of an increased risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, or teratogenic effects among pregnant women using colchicine to treat familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Although animal reproductive and developmental studies were not conducted with COLCRYS, published animal reproduction and development studies indicate that colchicine causes embryofetal toxicity, teratogenicity, and altered postnatal development at exposures within or above the clinical therapeutic range. COLCRYS should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. 8.2 Labor and Delivery The effect of colchicine on labor and delivery is unknown. 8.3 Nursing Mothers Colchicine is excreted into human milk. Limited information suggests that exclusively breast-fed infants receive less than 10 percent of the maternal weight-adjusted dose. While there are no published reports of adverse effects in breast-feeding infants of mothers taking colchicine, colchicine can affect gastrointestinal cell renewal and permeability. Caution should be exercised and breast-feeding infants should be observed for adverse effects when COLCRYS is administered to a nursing woman. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and efficacy of colchicine in children of all ages with FMF has been evaluated in uncontrolled studies. There does not appear to be an adverse effect on growth in children with FMF treated long-term with colchicine. Gout is rare in pediatric patients, safety and effectiveness of colchicine in pediatric patients has not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Clinical studies with colchicine for prophylaxis and treatment of gout flares and for treatment of FMF did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 years and older to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient with gout should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased renal function, concomitant disease, or other drug therapy [see Dose Modification for Co-administration of Interacting Drugs (2.4) ]. 8.6 Renal Impairment Colchicine is significantly excreted in urine in healthy subjects. Clearance of colchicine is decreased in patients with impaired renal function. Total body clearance of colchicine was reduced by 75% in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild (estimated creatinine clearance Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, the starting dose should be 0.3 mg per day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring. For the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients undergoing dialysis, the starting doses should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring [see Dose Modification in Renal Impairment (2.5) ]. Treatment of Gout Flares: For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of COLCRYS. However, in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted for the treatment of gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For patients with gout flares requiring repeated courses consideration should be given to alternate therapy. For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for the treatment of gout flares should be reduced to a single dose of 0.6 mg (1 tablet). For these patients, the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every 2 weeks [see Dose Modification in Renal Impairment (2.5) ]. FMF Although, pharmacokinetics of colchicine in patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) and moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal impairment is not known, these patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction may be necessary. In patients with severe renal failure (Clcr less than 30 mL/minute) and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis, COLCRYS may be started at the dose of 0.3 mg/day. Any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of COLCRYS [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) and Dose Modification in Renal Impairment (2.5) ]. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment The clearance of colchicine may be significantly reduced and plasma half-life prolonged in patients with chronic hepatic impairment, compared to healthy subjects [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) ]. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered for the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment (2.6) ]. Treatment of Gout Flares: For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended COLCRYS dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of COLCRYS. However, for the treatment of gout flares in patients with severe impairment while the dose does not need to be adjusted, the treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For these patients, requiring repeated courses for the treatment of gout flares, consideration should be given to alternate therapy [see Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment (2.6) ]. FMF In patients with severe hepatic disease, dose reduction should be considered with careful monitoring [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) and Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment (2.6) ].

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