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Save Up To 75% With This Colcrys Discount Card!

Looking for a Colcrys Coupon?

Save Up To 75% With This Colcrys Discount Card!

Estimated Savings Of Over $1,003,858
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Our FREE Colcrys discount card helps you save money on the exact same Colcrys prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Colcrys prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

Colcrys is used in the treatment of gout in adults. This medication works by changing the way the body uses uric acid crystals and reduces pain and swelling. Your doctor may prescribe this medication for additional conditions as well. Colcrys dosage will be determined by the prescribing doctor. Did you know that you might be able to save on your prescription with a Colcrys coupon or a Colcrys discount card?

Colcrys Side Effects
Any questions or concerns about this medication, including its side effects, should be discussed with a physician. Common side effects of Colcrys can vary with Colcrys dosage and include:
  • Muscle pain or weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pain
  • Itching
  • Numbness and tingling of the extremities
Colcrys Cost
Paying for prescriptions is a worry for many patients. If you are concerned about Colcrys cost, talk to your pharmacist about using a Colcrys discount card. The Colcrys discount card has saved many patients up to 75 percent on the out of pocket cost of their prescription. Prescription discount cards are accepted at millions of pharmacies and are an excellent way to reduce the rising cost of prescription medications. To get your own Colcrys discount card, just click the "Print Card Now" button and start saving today!

Sources:
"Colcrys (colchicine, USP) tablets." Gout Treatment & Medication. Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., 2013. Web. 14 Sept. 2013.
"Colcrys." Information from Drugs.com. Cerner Multum, Inc., 05 Mar. 2012. Web. 14 Sept. 2013.
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Estimated Savings Of Over $1,003,858

Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Colcrys discount card helps you save money on the exact same Colcrys prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Colcrys prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

Colcrys is used in the treatment of gout in adults. This medication works by changing the way the body uses uric acid crystals and reduces pain and swelling. Your doctor may prescribe this medication for additional conditions as well. Colcrys dosage will be determined by the prescribing doctor. Did you know that you might be able to save on your prescription with a Colcrys coupon or a Colcrys discount card?

Colcrys Side Effects
Any questions or concerns about this medication, including its side effects, should be discussed with a physician. Common side effects of Colcrys can vary with Colcrys dosage and include:
  • Muscle pain or weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pain
  • Itching
  • Numbness and tingling of the extremities
Colcrys Cost
Paying for prescriptions is a worry for many patients. If you are concerned about Colcrys cost, talk to your pharmacist about using a Colcrys discount card. The Colcrys discount card has saved many patients up to 75 percent on the out of pocket cost of their prescription. Prescription discount cards are accepted at millions of pharmacies and are an excellent way to reduce the rising cost of prescription medications. To get your own Colcrys discount card, just click the "Print Card Now" button and start saving today!

Sources:
"Colcrys (colchicine, USP) tablets." Gout Treatment & Medication. Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., 2013. Web. 14 Sept. 2013.
"Colcrys." Information from Drugs.com. Cerner Multum, Inc., 05 Mar. 2012. Web. 14 Sept. 2013.
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Colcrys prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Colcrys safely and effectively.
Before taking Colcrys please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Colcrys.
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE COLCRYS (colchicine, USP) tablets are an alkaloid indicated for: Prophylaxis and Treatment of Gout Flares in adults (1.1). Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in adults and children 4 years or older (1.2). COLCRYS is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes. 1.1 Gout Flares COLCRYS® (colchicine, USP) tablets are indicated for prophylaxis and the treatment of acute gout flares. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: COLCRYS is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares. Treatment of Gout Flares: COLCRYS tablets are indicated for treatment of acute gout flares when taken at the first sign of a flare. 1.2 Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) COLCRYS® (colchicine, USP) tablets are indicated in adults and children 4 years or older for treatment of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).
Table 1 COLCRYS Dose Adjustment for Co-administration with Interacting Drugs if no Alternative AvailableFor magnitude of effect on colchicine plasma concentrations [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) ]
Strong CYP3A4 InhibitorsPatients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given COLCRYS in conjunction with strong CYP3A4 or P-gp inhibitors [see CONTRAINDICATIONS (4) ].
Drug Noted or Anticipated Outcome Gout Flares FMF
Prophylaxis of Gout Flares Treatment of Gout Flares
Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose
Atazanavir Clarithromycin Darunavir/ RitonavirWhen used in combination with Ritonavir, see dosing recommendations for strong CYP3A4 inhibitors [see CONTRAINDICATIONS (4) ]. Indinavir Itraconazole Ketoconazole Lopinavir/ Ritonavir Nefazodone Nelfinavir Ritonavir Saquinavir Telithromycin Tipranavir/ Ritonavir Significant increase in colchicine plasma levels; fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with clarithromycin, a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Similarly, significant increase in colchicine plasma levels is anticipated with other strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. 0.6 mg twice a day 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg once a day 0.3 mg once every other day 1.2 mg (2 tablets) followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. 0.6 mg (1 tablet) × 1 dose, followed by 0.3 mg (1/2 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 – 2.4 mg Maximum daily dose of 0.6 mg (may be given as 0.3 mg twice a day)
Moderate CYP3A4 Inhibitors
Drug Noted or Anticipated Outcome Gout Flares FMF
Prophylaxis of Gout Flares Treatment of Gout Flares
Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose
Amprenavir Aprepitant Diltiazem Erythromycin Fluconazole Fosamprenavir (pro-drug of Amprenavir) Grapefruit Juice Verapamil Significant increase in colchicine plasma concentration is anticipated. Neuromuscular toxicity has been reported with diltiazem and verapamil interactions. 0.6 mg twice a day 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg twice a day or 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg once a day 1.2 mg (2 tablets) followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. 1.2 mg (2 tablets) × 1 dose. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 – 2.4 mg. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 mg (may be given as 0.6 mg twice a day)
P-gp Inhibitors
Drug Noted or Anticipated Outcome Gout Flares FMF
Prophylaxis of Gout Flares Treatment of Gout Flares
Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose Original Intended Dosage Adjusted Dose
Cyclosporine Ranolazine Significant increase in colchicine plasma levels; fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with cyclosporine, a P-gp inhibitor. Similarly, significant increase in colchicine plasma levels is anticipated with other P-gp inhibitors. 0.6 mg twice a day 0.6 mg once a day 0.3 mg once a day 0.3 mg once every other day 1.2 mg (2 tablets) followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) 1 hour later. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. 0.6 mg (1 tablet) × 1 dose. Dose to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. Maximum daily dose of 1.2 – 2.4 mg Maximum daily dose of 0.6 mg (may be given as 0.3 mg twice a day)
3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS 0.6 mg tablets — purple capsule-shaped, film-coated with AR 374 debossed on one side and scored on the other side. 0.6 mg tablets (3).
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Patients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given COLCRYS in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (this includes all protease inhibitors, except fosamprenavir). In these patients, life-threatening and fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with colchicine taken in therapeutic doses. Patients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given COLCRYS in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (5.3). In these patients, life-threatening and fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with colchicine taken in therapeutic doses (7).
5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep COLCRYS out of the reach of children (5.1, 10). Blood dyscrasias: myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported (5.2). Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine (5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 6, 10). Drug interaction P-gp and/or CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with P-gp and/or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death (5.3, 7). Neuromuscular toxicity: Myotoxicity including rhabdomyolysis may occur, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of COLCRYS (5.4, 7). 5.1 Fatal Overdose Fatal overdoses, both accidental and intentional, have been reported in adults and children who have ingested colchicine [see OVERDOSAGE (10) ]. COLCRYS should be kept out of the reach of children. 5.2 Blood Dyscrasias Myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses. 5.3 Drug Interactions Colchicine is a P-gp and CYP3A4 substrate. Life-threatening and fatal drug interactions have been reported in patients treated with colchicine given with P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. If treatment with a P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitor is required in patients with normal renal and hepatic function, the patient's dose of colchicine may need to be reduced or interrupted [see DRUG INTERACTIONS (7) ]. Use of COLCRYS in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (this includes all protease inhibitors, except fosamprenavir) is contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment [see CONTRAINDICATIONS (4) ]. 5.4 Neuromuscular Toxicity Colchicine-induced neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis have been reported with chronic treatment in therapeutic doses. Patients with renal dysfunction and elderly patients, even those with normal renal and hepatic function, are at increased risk. Concomitant use of atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, or benzafibrate (themselves associated with myotoxicity) or cyclosporine with COLCRYS may potentiate the development of myopathy [see DRUG INTERACTIONS (7) ]. Once colchicine is stopped, the symptoms generally resolve within 1 week to several months.
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: The most commonly reported adverse reaction in clinical trials for the prophylaxis of gout was diarrhea. Treatment of Gout Flares: The most common adverse reactions reported in the clinical trial for gout were diarrhea (23%) and pharyngolaryngeal pain (3%). FMF: Most common adverse reactions (up to 20%) are abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. These effects are usually mild, transient, and reversible upon lowering the dose (6). To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Mutual Pharmaceutical Company, Inc. at 1-888-351-3786 or drugsafety@urlpharma.com or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: The most commonly reported adverse reaction in clinical trials of colchicine for the prophylaxis of gout was diarrhea. Treatment of Gout Flares: The most common adverse reactions reported in the clinical trial with COLCRYS for treatment of gout flares were diarrhea (23%) and pharyngolaryngeal pain (3%). FMF: Gastrointestinal tract adverse effects are the most frequent side effects in patients initiating COLCRYS, usually presenting within 24 hours, and occurring in up to 20% of patients given therapeutic doses. Typical symptoms include cramping, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting. These events should be viewed as dose-limiting if severe as they can herald the onset of more significant toxicity. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience in Gout Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying and controlled conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug, and may not predict the rates observed in a broader patient population in clinical practice. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with a gout flare, gastrointestinal adverse reactions occurred in 26% of patients using the recommended dose (1.8 mg over 1 hour) of COLCRYS compared to 77% of patients taking a non-recommended high-dose (4.8 mg over 6 hours) of colchicine and 20% of patients taking placebo. Diarrhea was the most commonly reported drug-related gastrointestinal adverse event. As shown in Table 3, diarrhea is associated with COLCRYS treatment. Diarrhea was more likely to occur in patients taking the high-dose regimen than the low-dose regimen. Severe diarrhea occurred in 19% and vomiting occurred in 17% of patients taking the non-recommended high-dose colchicine regimen but did not occur in the recommended low-dose COLCRYS regimen. Table 3 Number (%) of Patients with at Least One Drug-Related Treatment Emergent Adverse Events with an Incidence of ≥ 2% of Patients in Any Treatment Group MedDRA System Organ Class COLCRYS Dose Placebo MedDRA Preferred Term High (N=52) n (%) Low (N=74) n (%) (N=59) n (%) Number of Patients with at Least One Drug-Related TEAE 40 (77) 27 (37) 16 (27) Gastrointestinal Disorders 40 (77) 19 (26) 12 (20) Diarrhea 40 (77) 17 (23) 8 (14) Nausea 9 (17) 3 (4) 3 (5) Vomiting 9 (17) 0 0 Abdominal Discomfort 0 0 2 (3) General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions 4 (8) 1 (1) 1 (2) Fatigue 2 (4) 1 (1) 1 (2) Metabolic and Nutrition Disorders 0 3 (4) 2 (3) Gout 0 3 (4) 1 (2) Nervous System Disorders 1 (2) 1 (1.4) 2 (3) Headache 1 (2) 1 (1) 2 (3) Respiratory Thoracic Mediastinal Disorders 1 (2) 2 (3) 0 Pharyngolaryngeal Pain 1 (2) 2 (3) 0 6.2 Postmarketing Experience Serious toxic manifestations associated with colchicine include myelosuppression, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and injury to cells in the renal, hepatic, circulatory, and central nervous systems. These most often occur with excessive accumulation or overdosage [see OVERDOSAGE (10) ]. The following adverse reactions have been reported with colchicine. These have been generally reversible upon temporarily interrupting treatment or lowering the dose of colchicine. Neurological: sensory motor neuropathy Dermatological: alopecia, maculopapular rash, purpura, rash Digestive: abdominal cramping, abdominal pain, diarrhea, lactose intolerance, nausea, vomiting Hematological: leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, aplastic anemia Hepatobiliary: elevated AST, elevated ALT Musculoskeletal: myopathy, elevated CPK, myotonia, muscle weakness, muscle pain, rhabdomyolysis Reproductive: azoospermia, oligospermia
7 DRUG INTERACTIONS COLCRYS (colchicine) is a substrate of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Of the cytochrome P450 enzymes tested, CYP3A4 was mainly involved in the metabolism of colchicine. If COLCRYS is administered with drugs that inhibit P-gp, most of which also inhibit CYP3A4, increased concentrations of colchicine are likely. Fatal drug interactions have been reported. Physicians should ensure that patients are suitable candidates for treatment with COLCRYS and remain alert for signs and symptoms of toxicities related to increased colchicine exposure as a result of a drug interaction. Signs and symptoms of COLCRYS toxicity should be evaluated promptly and, if toxicity is suspected, COLCRYS should be discontinued immediately. Table 4 provides recommendations as a result of other potentially significant drug interactions. Table 1 provides recommendations for strong and moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors and P-gp inhibitors. Table 4 Other Potentially Significant Drug Interactions Concomitant Drug Class or Food Noted or anticipated Outcome Clinical Comment HMG-Co A Reductase Inhibitors: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, simvastatin Pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interaction: the addition of one drug to a stable long-term regimen of the other has resulted in myopathy and rhabdomyolysis (including a fatality) Weigh the potential benefits and risks and carefully monitor patients for any signs or symptoms of muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness, particularly during initial therapy; monitoring CPK (creatine phosphokinase) will not necessarily prevent the occurrence of severe myopathy. Other Lipid Lowering Drugs: fibrates, gemfibrozil Digitalis Glycosides: digoxin P-gp substrate; rhabdomyolysis has been reported Co-administration of P-gp and/or CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., clarithromycin or cyclosporine) have been demonstrated to alter the concentration of colchicine. The potential for drug-drug interactions must be considered prior to and during therapy. See full prescribing information for a complete list of reported and potential interactions (2.4, 5.3, 7).
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS In the presence of mild to moderate renal or hepatic impairment, adjustment of dosing is not required for treatment of gout flare, prophylaxis of gout flare, and FMF but patients should be monitored closely (2.5, 8.6). In patients with severe renal impairment for prophylaxis of gout flares the starting dose should be 0.3 mg/day, for gout flares no dose adjustment is required but a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. In FMF patients, start with 0.3 mg/day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring (2.5, 8.6). In patients with severe hepatic impairment, a dose reduction may be needed in prophylaxis of gout flares and FMF patients; while a dose reduction may not be needed in gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks (2.5, 2.6, 8.6, 8.7). For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for prophylaxis of gout flares should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring. For treatment of gout flares, the total recommended dose should be reduced to 0.6 mg (1 tablet) × 1 dose and the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every two weeks. For FMF patients the starting dose should be 0.3 mg per day and dosing can be increased with close monitoring (2.5, 8.6). Pregnancy: Use only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus (8.1). Nursing Mothers: Caution should be exercised when administered to a nursing woman (8.3). Geriatric Use: The recommended dose of colchicine should be based on renal function (2.5, 8.5). 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C There are no adequate and well-controlled studies with colchicine in pregnant women. Colchicine crosses the human placenta. While not studied in the treatment of gout flares, data from a limited number of published studies found no evidence of an increased risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, or teratogenic effects among pregnant women using colchicine to treat familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Although animal reproductive and developmental studies were not conducted with COLCRYS, published animal reproduction and development studies indicate that colchicine causes embryofetal toxicity, teratogenicity, and altered postnatal development at exposures within or above the clinical therapeutic range. COLCRYS should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. 8.2 Labor and Delivery The effect of colchicine on labor and delivery is unknown. 8.3 Nursing Mothers Colchicine is excreted into human milk. Limited information suggests that exclusively breast-fed infants receive less than 10 percent of the maternal weight-adjusted dose. While there are no published reports of adverse effects in breast-feeding infants of mothers taking colchicine, colchicine can affect gastrointestinal cell renewal and permeability. Caution should be exercised and breast-feeding infants should be observed for adverse effects when COLCRYS is administered to a nursing woman. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and efficacy of colchicine in children of all ages with FMF has been evaluated in uncontrolled studies. There does not appear to be an adverse effect on growth in children with FMF treated long-term with colchicine. Gout is rare in pediatric patients, safety and effectiveness of colchicine in pediatric patients has not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Clinical studies with colchicine for prophylaxis and treatment of gout flares and for treatment of FMF did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 years and older to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient with gout should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased renal function, concomitant disease, or other drug therapy [see Dose Modification for Co-administration of Interacting Drugs (2.4) ]. 8.6 Renal Impairment Colchicine is significantly excreted in urine in healthy subjects. Clearance of colchicine is decreased in patients with impaired renal function. Total body clearance of colchicine was reduced by 75% in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild (estimated creatinine clearance Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, the starting dose should be 0.3 mg per day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring. For the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients undergoing dialysis, the starting doses should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring [see Dose Modification in Renal Impairment (2.5) ]. Treatment of Gout Flares: For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of COLCRYS. However, in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted for the treatment of gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For patients with gout flares requiring repeated courses consideration should be given to alternate therapy. For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for the treatment of gout flares should be reduced to a single dose of 0.6 mg (1 tablet). For these patients, the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every 2 weeks [see Dose Modification in Renal Impairment (2.5) ]. FMF Although, pharmacokinetics of colchicine in patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) and moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal impairment is not known, these patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction may be necessary. In patients with severe renal failure (Clcr less than 30 mL/minute) and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis, COLCRYS may be started at the dose of 0.3 mg/day. Any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of COLCRYS [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) and Dose Modification in Renal Impairment (2.5) ]. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment The clearance of colchicine may be significantly reduced and plasma half-life prolonged in patients with chronic hepatic impairment, compared to healthy subjects [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) ]. Prophylaxis of Gout Flares: For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered for the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment (2.6) ]. Treatment of Gout Flares: For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended COLCRYS dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of COLCRYS. However, for the treatment of gout flares in patients with severe impairment while the dose does not need to be adjusted, the treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For these patients, requiring repeated courses for the treatment of gout flares, consideration should be given to alternate therapy [see Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment (2.6) ]. FMF In patients with severe hepatic disease, dose reduction should be considered with careful monitoring [see Pharmacokinetics (12.3) and Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment (2.6) ].

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Frequently Asked Questions

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How Do I Know My Pharmacy Will Accept It?
That's simple. The card is accepted at ALL CHAIN PHARMACIES such as CVS, Rite Aid, and Walgreens. If you don't know if your pharmacy accepts the card simply call them and give them the BIN and PCN numbers on the card. The card is accepted at most pharmacies. If you call a few one is sure to accept it.
Can I Use This In Conjunction With My Insurance?
No, unfortunately insurance companies don't allow "double-savings". However, if your insurance does not cover certain drugs (ex - cosmetic drugs, brand names, prenatal vitamins, etc) then this card may save you money. Also if your insurance requires you to pay a deductible on your brand name drugs before covering them, then this card may also provider greater savings!
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You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
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Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
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Is this the same as a Colcrys copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
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Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

Accepted At Over 59,000 Pharmacies Nationwide!

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Colchicine is a medication used for gout. It is a toxic natural product and secondary metabolite, originally extracted from plants of the genus Colchicum (autumn crocus, Colchicum autumnale, also known as "meadow saffron"). It was used originally to treat rheumatic complaints, especially gout, and still finds use for these purposes today despite dosing issues concerning its toxicity. It was also prescribed for its cathartic and emetic effects. Colchicine's present medicinal use is in the treatment of gout, familial Mediterranean fever, pericarditis and Behçet's disease. It is also being investigated for its use as an anticancer drug. Oral colchicine has been used for many years as an unapproved drug with no prescribing information, dosage recommendations, or drug interaction warnings approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On July 30, 2009 the FDA approved colchicine as a monotherapy for the treatment of three different indications: familial Mediterranean fever, acute gout flares, and for the prophylaxis of gout flares, and gave URL Pharma a three-year marketing exclusivity agreement in exchange for URL Pharma doing 17 new studies and investing $100 million into the product, of which $45 million went to the FDA for the application fee. URL Pharma raised the price from $0.09 per tablet to $4.85, and the FDA removed the older unapproved colchicine from the market in October 2010 both in oral and IV form, but gave pharmacies the opportunity to buy up the older unapproved colchicine. Colchicine in combination with probenecid has been FDA approved prior to 1982.

Wikipedia contributors. "Colcrys" Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Jul 7, 2012. Web. Jul 10, 2012.

Colcrys Coupon

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Important Note

The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

This Colcrys discount should not be confused with a Colcrys coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

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"Wow! I can`t believe this actually worked. I have no insurance at this time and have to pay
I lost my insurance coverage and went online seeking help and found this CARD! It worked and saved me money $$$$$ very 1st time. There are others out there but with less coverage and a smaller list of drugs or they charge you a monthly fee. I am so happy I take 3 prescriptions a month forever and at times more and I will save over 78% as I figured it out, and that is great tell everybody you know as I am doing."
- David B.
Save up to 75% on your medication
Save up to 75% on your medication