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Doryx Prescribing Information

This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Doryx safely and effectively. Before taking Doryx please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Doryx.

Recent Changes

Warnings and Precautions (5.5) 02/2015

Indications And Usage

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of DORYX and other antibacterial drugs, DORYX should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy. Doxycycline is a tetracycline-class antibacterial indicated in the following conditions or diseases: DORYX is a tetracycline-class antibacterial indicated for: Rickettsial infections ( 1.1 ) Sexually transmitted infections ( 1.2 ) Respiratory tract infections ( 1.3 ) Specific bacterial infections ( 1.4 ) Ophthalmic infections ( 1.5 ) Anthrax, including inhalational anthrax (post-exposure) ( 1.6 ) Alternative treatment for selected infections when penicillin is contraindicated ( 1.7 ) Adjunctive therapy in acute intestinal amebiasis and severe acne ( 1.8 ) Prophylaxis of malaria ( 1.9 ) 1.1 Rickettsial infections Rocky Mountain spotted fever, typhus fever and the typhus group, Q fever, rickettsialpox, and tick fevers caused by Rickettsiae. 1.2 Sexually transmitted infections Uncomplicated urethral, endocervical or rectal infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. Nongonococcal urethritis caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum. Lymphogranuloma venereum caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. Granuloma inguinale caused by Klebsiella granulomatis. Uncomplicated gonorrhea caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Chancroid caused by Haemophilus ducreyi. 1.3 Respiratory tract infections Respiratory tract infections caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Psittacosis (ornithosis) caused by Chlamydophila psittaci. Because many strains of the following groups of microorganisms have been shown to be resistant to doxycycline, culture and susceptibility testing are recommended. Doxycycline is indicated for treatment of infections caused by the following micro-organisms, when bacteriological testing indicates appropriate susceptibility to the drug: Respiratory tract infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae. Respiratory tract infections caused by Klebsiella species. Upper respiratory infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. 1.4 Specific bacterial infections Relapsing fever due to Borrelia recurrentis. Plague due to Yersinia pestis. Tularemia due to Francisella tularensis. Cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae. Campylobacter fetus infections caused by Campylobacter fetus. Brucellosis due to Brucella species (in conjunction with streptomycin). Bartonellosis due to Bartonella bacilliformis. Because many strains of the following groups of microorganisms have been shown to be resistant to doxycycline, culture and susceptibility testing are recommended. Doxycycline is indicated for treatment of infections caused by the following gram-negative microorganisms, when bacteriological testing indicates appropriate susceptibility to the drug: Escherichia coli Enterobacter aerogenes Shigella species Acinetobacter species Urinary tract infections caused by Klebsiella species. 1.5 Ophthalmic infections Trachoma caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, although the infectious agent is not always eliminated as judged by immunofluorescence. Inclusion conjunctivitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. 1.6 Anthrax including inhalational anthrax (post-exposure) Anthrax due to Bacillus anthracis, including inhalational anthrax (post-exposure): to reduce the incidence or progression of disease following exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis. 1.7 Alternative treatment for selected infections when penicillin is contraindicated When penicillin is contraindicated, doxycycline is an alternative drug in the treatment of the following infections: Syphilis caused by Treponema pallidum. Yaws caused by Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue. Vincent's infection caused by Fusobacterium fusiforme. Actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces israelii. Infections caused by Clostridium species. 1.8 Adjunctive therapy for acute intestinal amebiasis and severe acne In acute intestinal amebiasis, doxycycline may be a useful adjunct to amebicides. In severe acne, doxycycline may be useful adjunctive therapy. 1.9 Prophylaxis of malaria Doxycycline is indicated for the prophylaxis of malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum in short-term travelers (less than 4 months) to areas with chloroquine and/or pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine resistant strains [see Dosage and Administration (2.2) and Patient Counseling Information (17) ].

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Dosage Forms And Strengths

DORYX (doxycycline hyclate delayed-release tablets, USP), 50 mg are white, oval tablets containing yellow pellets and debossed with "DV" on one face and plain on the other. Each tablet contains specially coated pellets of doxycycline hyclate equivalent to 50 mg of doxycycline. DORYX (doxycycline hyclate delayed-release tablets), 200 mg are white, oval scored tablets containing yellow pellets and debossed with "D|D" on one face and plain on the other. Each tablet contains specially coated pellets of doxycycline hyclate equivalent to 200 mg of doxycycline. Tablets: 50 mg and 200 mg (3)

Contraindications

The drug is contraindicated in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of the tetracyclines. Doxycycline is contraindicated in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of the tetracyclines. ( 4 )

Warning and Cautions

The use of drugs of the tetracycline-class during tooth development (last half of pregnancy, infancy and childhood to the age of 8 years) may cause permanent discoloration of the teeth (yellow-gray-brown). ( 5.1 ) Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea: Evaluate patients if diarrhea occurs. ( 5.2 ) Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines. Limit sun exposure. ( 5.3 ) Overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms, including fungi, may occur. Re- evaluate therapy if superinfection occurs. ( 5.4 ) 5.1 Tooth Development The use of drugs of the tetracycline-class during tooth development (last half of pregnancy, infancy and childhood to the age of 8 years) may cause permanent discoloration of the teeth (yellow-gray-brown). This adverse reaction is more common during long-term use of the drugs but it has been observed following repeated short-term courses. Enamel hypoplasia has also been reported. Doxycycline should not be used in this age group, except for anthrax, including inhalational anthrax (post-exposure), unless other drugs are not likely to be effective or are contraindicated. 5.2 Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including DORYX Tablets, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile. C. difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD. Hypertoxin producing strains of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibacterial use. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents. If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibacterial use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibacterial treatment of C. difficile, and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated. 5.3 Photosensitivity Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines. Patients apt to be exposed to direct sunlight or ultraviolet light should be advised that this reaction can occur with tetracycline drugs, and treatment should be discontinued at the first evidence of skin erythema. 5.4 Superinfection As with other antibacterial preparations, use of DORYX may result in overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms, including fungi. If superinfection occurs, the antibacterial should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. 5.5 Intracranial Hypertension Intracranial hypertension (IH, pseudotumor cerebri) has been associated with the use of tetracycline including DORYX. Clinical manifestations of IH include headache, blurred vision, diplopia, and vision loss; papilledema can be found on fundoscopy. Women of childbearing age who are overweight or have a history of IH are at greater risk for developing tetracycline associated IH. Avoid concomitant use of isotretinoin and Doryx because isotretinoin is also known to cause pseudotumor cerebri. Although IH typically resolves after discontinuation of treatment, the possibility for permanent visual loss exists. If visual disturbance occurs during treatment, prompt ophthalmologic evaluation is warranted. Since intracranial pressure can remain elevated for weeks after drug cessation patients should be monitored until they stabilize. 5.6 Skeletal Development All tetracyclines form a stable calcium complex in any bone-forming tissue. A decrease in fibula growth rate has been observed in prematures given oral tetracycline in doses of 25 mg/kg every six hours. This reaction was shown to be reversible when the drug was discontinued. Results of animal studies indicate that tetracyclines cross the placenta, are found in fetal tissues, and can have toxic effects on the developing fetus (often related to retardation of skeletal development). Evidence of embryotoxicity also has been noted in animals treated early in pregnancy. If any tetracycline is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking these drugs, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. 5.7 Antianabolic Action The antianabolic action of the tetracyclines may cause an increase in BUN. Studies to date indicate that this does not occur with the use of doxycycline in patients with impaired renal function. 5.8 Malaria Doxycycline offers substantial but not complete suppression of the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium strains. Doxycycline does not suppress P. falciparum's sexual blood stage gametocytes. Subjects completing this prophylactic regimen may still transmit the infection to mosquitoes outside endemic areas. 5.9 Development of Drug-Resistant Bacteria Prescribing DORYX in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection or a prophylactic indication is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria. 5.10 Laboratory Monitoring for Long-Term Therapy In long-term therapy, periodic laboratory evaluation of organ systems, including hematopoietic, renal, and hepatic studies should be performed.

Adverse Reactions

Adverse reactions observed in patients receiving tetracyclines include anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, photosensitivity, urticaria, and hemolytic anemia. (6) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Mayne Pharma at 1-844-825-8500 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trial Experience The safety and efficacy of DORYX Tablets, 200 mg as a single daily dose was evaluated in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled study. DORYX Tablets, 200 mg was given orally once-a-day for 7 days and compared to doxycycline hyclate capsules 100 mg given orally twice daily for 7 days for the treatment of men and women with uncomplicated urogenital C. trachomatis infection. Adverse events in the Safety Population were reported by 99 (40.2%) subjects in the DORYX Tablets, 200 mg treatment group and 132 (53.2%) subjects in the doxycyclinehyclate capsules reference treatment group. Most AEs were mild in intensity. The most commonly reported adverse events in both treatment groups were nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and bacterial vaginitis, Table 1. Table 1: Adverse Reactions Reported in Greater than or Equal to 2% of Subjects DORYX Tablets, 200 mg N = 246 Preferred Term n (%) Subjects with any AE 99 (40.2) Nausea 33 (13.4) Vomiting 20 (8.1) Headache 5 (2.0) Diarrhea 8 (3.3) Abdominal Pain Upper 5 (2.0) Vaginitis Bacterial 8 (3.3) Vulvovaginal Mycotic Infection 5 (2.0) Because clinical trials are conducted under prescribed conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trial may not always reflect the rates observed in practice. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of doxycycline. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate a causal relationship to drug exposure. Due to oral doxycycline's virtually complete absorption, side effects to the lower bowel, particularly diarrhea, have been infrequent. The following adverse reactions have been observed in patients receiving tetracyclines: Gastrointestinal: Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, glossitis, dysphagia, enterocolitis, and inflammatory lesions (with monilial overgrowth) in the anogenital region. Hepatotoxicity has been reported. These reactions have been caused by both the oral and parenteral administration of tetracyclines. Esophagitis and esophageal ulcerations have been reported in patients receiving capsule and tablet forms of drugs in the tetracycline- class. Most of these patients took medications immediately before going to bed [see Dosage and Administration (2.1) ]. Skin: Maculopapular and erythematous rashes, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, exfoliative dermatitis, and erythema multiforme have been reported. Photosensitivity is discussed above [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ]. Renal: Rise in BUN has been reported and is apparently dose-related [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7) ]. Hypersensitivity reactions: Urticaria, angioneurotic edema, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid purpura, serum sickness, pericarditis, and exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Blood: Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and eosinophilia have been reported. Intracranial Hypertension: Intracranial hypertension (IH, pseudotumor cerebri) has been associated with the use of tetracycline [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) ] Thyroid Gland Changes: When given over prolonged periods, tetracyclines have been reported to produce brown-black microscopic discoloration of thyroid glands. No abnormalities of thyroid function are known to occur.

Drug Interactions

Patients who are on anticoagulant therapy may require downward adjustment of their anticoagulant dosage ( 7.1 ) Avoid co-administration of tetracyclines with penicillin ( 7.2 ) Absorption of tetracyclines is impaired by antacids containing aluminum, calcium, or magnesium, bismuth subsalicylate and iron-containing preparations ( 7.3 ) Concurrent use of tetracycline may render oral contraceptives less effective ( 7.4 ) Barbiturates, carbamazepine and phenytoin decrease the half-life of doxycycline ( 7.5 ) 7.1 Anticoagulant Drugs Because tetracyclines have been shown to depress plasma prothrombin activity, patients who are on anticoagulant therapy may require downward adjustment of their anticoagulant dosage. 7.2 Penicillin Since bacteriostatic drugs may interfere with the bactericidal action of penicillin, it is advisable to avoid giving tetracyclines in conjunction with penicillin. 7.3 Antacids and Iron Preparations Absorption of tetracyclines is impaired by antacids containing aluminum, calcium, or magnesium, bismuth subsalicylate, and iron-containing preparations. 7.4 Oral Contraceptives Concurrent use of tetracycline may render oral contraceptives less effective. 7.5 Barbiturates and anti-epileptics Barbiturates, carbamazepine, and phenytoin decrease the half-life of doxycycline. 7.6 Penthrane The concurrent use of tetracycline and Penthrane® (methoxyflurane) has been reported to result in fatal renal toxicity. 7.7 Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions False elevations of urinary catecholamines may occur due to interference with the fluorescence test.

Use In Specific Populations

Pregnancy Category D ( 8.1 ) Tetracyclines are excreted in human milk; however, the extent of absorption of doxycycline in the breastfed infant is not known. Doxycycline use during nursing should be avoided if possible. ( 8.3 ) 8.1 Pregnancy Teratogenic Effects. Pregnancy Category D: There are no adequate and well-controlled studies on the use of doxycycline in pregnant women. The vast majority of reported experience with doxycycline during human pregnancy is short-term, first trimester exposure. There are no human data available to assess the effects of long-term therapy of doxycycline in pregnant women such as that proposed for the treatment of anthrax exposure. An expert review of published data on experiences with doxycycline use during pregnancy by TERIS - the Teratogen Information System - concluded that therapeutic doses during pregnancy are unlikely to pose a substantial teratogenic risk (the quantity and quality of data were assessed as limited to fair), but the data are insufficient to state that there is no risk.1 A case-control study (18,515 mothers of infants with congenital anomalies and 32,804 mothers of infants with no congenital anomalies) shows a weak but marginally statistically significant association with total malformations and use of doxycycline anytime during pregnancy. Sixty-three (0.19%) of the controls and 56 (0.30%) of the cases were treated with doxycycline. This association was not seen when the analysis was confined to maternal treatment during the period of organogenesis (that is, in the second and third months of gestation), with the exception of a marginal relationship with neural tube defect based on only two-exposed cases.2 A small prospective study of 81 pregnancies describes 43 pregnant women treated for 10 days with doxycycline during early first trimester. All mothers reported their exposed infants were normal at 1 year of age.3 Nonteratogenic effects: [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.6) ]. 8.3 Nursing Mothers Tetracyclines are excreted in human milk, however, the extent of absorption of tetracyclines including doxycycline, by the breastfed infant is not known. Short-term use by lactating women is not necessarily contraindicated. The effects of prolonged exposure to doxycycline in breast milk are unknown4. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from doxycycline, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.6) ]. 8.4 Pediatric use Because of the effects of drugs of the tetracycline-class on tooth development and growth, DORYX should not be used in pediatric patients to the age of 8 years, unless the potential benefits are expected to outweigh the risks such as for anthrax, or when other drugs are not likely to be effective or are contraindicated [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.6) and Dosage and Administration (2.1, 2.3) ]. 8.5 Geriatric use Clinical studies of DORYX did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. DORYX 50 mg tablets contain 3 mg (0.131 mEq) of sodium. DORYX 200 mg tablets contain 12 mg (0.522 mEq) of sodium.

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