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Save Up To 75% With This Janumet Discount Card!

Looking for a Janumet Coupon?

Save Up To 75% With This Janumet Discount Card!

Estimated Savings Of Over $9,871,012
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Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Janumet discount card helps you save money on the exact same Janumet prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Janumet prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

For individuals with type 2 diabetes – a condition where the body does not produce enough insulin or can`t use it properly – Janumet is one of several drugs that have shown great promise in managing symptoms. Janumet coupon cards, accepted at all major pharmacies, are available from Medicationdiscountcard.com.

How It Works
Janumet is a combination of drugs that help the body process blood sugar more efficiently while also slowing the production of sugar by the liver. It`s often paired with other medications that treat type 2 diabetes in different ways. Diet and exercise are also important in the management of this disease.

Dosage
Janumet comes as a tablet that people take once or twice a day with food. Take the medication exactly as directed, regardless of how you feel. There`s no cure for diabetes, so maintaining a consistent regimen of medications, diet and exercise is important to feeling well and leading a normal life.

Side Effects and Safety Precautions
In people with diabetes, low and high blood sugar episodes are always a risk, even when taking medications designed to control these risks. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist about the signs of low and high blood sugar and learn what you can do to correct such situations.

Typical side effects of Janumet include runny nose, sore throat, headache and diarrhea. Persistent pain, especially in the stomach and back, is a more serious adverse reaction and needs immediate attention.

Sources
"Janumet." WebMD. 2015. Accessed 1 March 2015.
"Sitagliptin." MedlinePlus. 15 July 2014. Accessed 1 March 2015.
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  • ABC
  • NBC
  • FOX
  • CBS
  • San Francisco Chronicle
  • About.com
  • CIO
  • Boston.com
Estimated Savings Of Over $9,871,012

Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Janumet discount card helps you save money on the exact same Janumet prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Janumet prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

For individuals with type 2 diabetes – a condition where the body does not produce enough insulin or can`t use it properly – Janumet is one of several drugs that have shown great promise in managing symptoms. Janumet coupon cards, accepted at all major pharmacies, are available from Medicationdiscountcard.com.

How It Works
Janumet is a combination of drugs that help the body process blood sugar more efficiently while also slowing the production of sugar by the liver. It`s often paired with other medications that treat type 2 diabetes in different ways. Diet and exercise are also important in the management of this disease.

Dosage
Janumet comes as a tablet that people take once or twice a day with food. Take the medication exactly as directed, regardless of how you feel. There`s no cure for diabetes, so maintaining a consistent regimen of medications, diet and exercise is important to feeling well and leading a normal life.

Side Effects and Safety Precautions
In people with diabetes, low and high blood sugar episodes are always a risk, even when taking medications designed to control these risks. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist about the signs of low and high blood sugar and learn what you can do to correct such situations.

Typical side effects of Janumet include runny nose, sore throat, headache and diarrhea. Persistent pain, especially in the stomach and back, is a more serious adverse reaction and needs immediate attention.

Sources
"Janumet." WebMD. 2015. Accessed 1 March 2015.
"Sitagliptin." MedlinePlus. 15 July 2014. Accessed 1 March 2015.
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JANUMET prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Janumet safely and effectively.
Before taking Janumet please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Janumet.
WARNING: LACTIC ACIDOSIS Lactic acidosis is a rare, but serious complication that can occur due to metformin accumulation. The risk increases with conditions such as sepsis, dehydration, excess alcohol intake, hepatic impairment, renal impairment, and acute congestive heart failure. The onset is often subtle, accompanied only by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, increasing somnolence, and nonspecific abdominal distress. Laboratory abnormalities include low pH, increased anion gap and elevated blood lactate. If acidosis is suspected, JANUMET should be discontinued and the patient hospitalized immediately. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1).] WARNING: LACTIC ACIDOSIS See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Lactic acidosis can occur due to metformin accumulation. The risk increases with conditions such as sepsis, dehydration, excess alcohol intake, hepatic insufficiency, renal impairment, and acute congestive heart failure. (5.1) Symptoms include malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, increasing somnolence, and nonspecific abdominal distress. Laboratory abnormalities include low pH, increased anion gap and elevated blood lactate. (5.1) If acidosis is suspected, discontinue JANUMET and hospitalize the patient immediately. (5.1)
Warnings and Precautions
Severe and Disabling Arthralgia (5.15) 08/2015
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE JANUMET is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus when treatment with both sitagliptin and metformin is appropriate. [See Clinical Studies (14).] Important Limitations of Use JANUMET should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUMET has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for the development of pancreatitis while using JANUMET. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.2).] JANUMET is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor and biguanide combination product indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus when treatment with both sitagliptin and metformin is appropriate. (1, 14) Important Limitations of Use: JANUMET should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. (1) JANUMET has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. (1, 5.2)
3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS 50 mg/500 mg tablets are light pink, capsule-shaped, film-coated tablets with "575" debossed on one side. 50 mg/1000 mg tablets are red, capsule-shaped, film-coated tablets with "577" debossed on one side. Tablets: 50 mg sitagliptin/500 mg metformin HCl and 50 mg sitagliptin/1000 mg metformin HCl (3)
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS JANUMET (sitagliptin and metformin HCl) is contraindicated in patients with: Renal impairment (e.g., serum creatinine levels greater than or equal to 1.5 mg/dL for men, greater than or equal to 1.4 mg/dL for women or abnormal creatinine clearance), which may also result from conditions such as cardiovascular collapse (shock), acute myocardial infarction, and septicemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Hypersensitivity to metformin hydrochloride. Acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis should be treated with insulin. History of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to JANUMET or sitagliptin (one of the components of JANUMET), such as anaphylaxis or angioedema. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.14); Adverse Reactions (6.2).] Renal dysfunction, e.g., serum creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dL [males], ≥1.4 mg/dL [females] or abnormal creatinine clearance. (4, 5.1, 5.4) Metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis. (4, 5.1) History of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to JANUMET or sitagliptin (one of the components of JANUMET), such as anaphylaxis or angioedema. (5.14, 6.2)
5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Lactic acidosis: Warn against excessive alcohol intake. JANUMET is not recommended in hepatic impairment and is contraindicated in renal impairment. Ensure normal renal function before initiating and at least annually thereafter. (4, 5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 5.6) Temporarily discontinue JANUMET in patients undergoing radiologic studies with intravascular administration of iodinated contrast materials or any surgical procedures necessitating restricted intake of food or fluids. (5.1, 5.4, 5.7, 5.11) There have been postmarketing reports of acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis. If pancreatitis is suspected, promptly discontinue JANUMET. (5.2) There have been postmarketing reports of acute renal failure, sometimes requiring dialysis. Before initiating JANUMET and at least annually thereafter, assess renal function and verify as normal. (4, 5.1, 5.4, 5.10, 6.2) Vitamin B12 deficiency: Metformin may lower Vitamin B12 levels. Measure hematologic parameters annually. (5.5, 6.1) When used with an insulin secretagogue (e.g., sulfonylurea) or with insulin, a lower dose of the insulin secretagogue or insulin may be required to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. (2.1, 5.9) There have been postmarketing reports of serious allergic and hypersensitivity reactions in patients treated with sitagliptin (one of the components of JANUMET), such as anaphylaxis, angioedema, and exfoliative skin conditions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome. In such cases, promptly stop JANUMET, assess for other potential causes, institute appropriate monitoring and treatment, and initiate alternative treatment for diabetes. (5.14, 6.2) Severe and disabling arthralgia has been reported in patients taking DPP-4 inhibitors. Consider as a possible cause for severe joint pain and discontinue drug if appropriate. (5.15) There have been no clinical studies establishing conclusive evidence of macrovascular risk reduction with JANUMET or any other anti-diabetic drug. (5.16) 5.1 Lactic Acidosis Metformin hydrochloride Lactic acidosis is a rare, but serious, metabolic complication that can occur due to metformin accumulation during treatment with JANUMET; when it occurs, it is fatal in approximately 50% of cases. Lactic acidosis may also occur in association with a number of pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes mellitus, and whenever there is significant tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxemia. Lactic acidosis is characterized by elevated blood lactate levels (>5 mmol/L), decreased blood pH, electrolyte disturbances with an increased anion gap, and an increased lactate/pyruvate ratio. When metformin is implicated as the cause of lactic acidosis, metformin plasma levels >5 μg/mL are generally found. The reported incidence of lactic acidosis in patients receiving metformin hydrochloride is very low (approximately 0.03 cases/1000 patient-years, with approximately 0.015 fatal cases/1000 patient-years). In more than 20,000 patient-years exposure to metformin in clinical trials, there were no reports of lactic acidosis. Reported cases have occurred primarily in diabetic patients with significant renal impairment, including both intrinsic renal disease and renal hypoperfusion, often in the setting of multiple concomitant medical/surgical problems and multiple concomitant medications. Patients with congestive heart failure requiring pharmacologic management, in particular those with unstable or acute congestive heart failure who are at risk of hypoperfusion and hypoxemia, are at increased risk of lactic acidosis. The risk of lactic acidosis increases with the degree of renal dysfunction and the patient's age. The risk of lactic acidosis may, therefore, be significantly decreased by regular monitoring of renal function in patients taking metformin and by use of the minimum effective dose of metformin. In particular, treatment of the elderly should be accompanied by careful monitoring of renal function. In addition, metformin should be promptly withheld in the presence of any condition associated with hypoxemia, dehydration, or sepsis. Because impaired hepatic function may significantly limit the ability to clear lactate, metformin should generally be avoided in patients with clinical or laboratory evidence of hepatic disease. Patients should be cautioned against excessive alcohol intake, either acute or chronic, when taking metformin, since alcohol potentiates the effects of metformin hydrochloride on lactate metabolism. In addition, metformin should be temporarily discontinued prior to any intravascular radiocontrast study and for any surgical procedure [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4, 5.6, 5.7, 5.11)]. The onset of lactic acidosis often is subtle, and accompanied only by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, increasing somnolence, and nonspecific abdominal distress. There may be associated hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias with more marked acidosis. The patient and the patient's physician must be aware of the possible importance of such symptoms and the patient should be instructed to notify the physician immediately if they occur [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)]. Metformin should be withdrawn until the situation is clarified. Serum electrolytes, ketones, blood glucose, and if indicated, blood pH, lactate levels, and even blood metformin levels may be useful. Once a patient is stabilized on any dose level of metformin, gastrointestinal symptoms, which are common during initiation of therapy, are unlikely to be drug related. Later occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms could be due to lactic acidosis or other serious disease. Levels of fasting venous plasma lactate above the upper limit of normal but less than 5 mmol/L in patients taking metformin do not necessarily indicate impending lactic acidosis and may be explainable by other mechanisms, such as poorly controlled diabetes or obesity, vigorous physical activity, or technical problems in sample handling [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8, 5.13)]. Lactic acidosis should be suspected in any diabetic patient with metabolic acidosis lacking evidence of ketoacidosis (ketonuria and ketonemia). Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital setting. In a patient with lactic acidosis who is taking metformin, the drug should be discontinued immediately and general supportive measures promptly instituted. Because metformin hydrochloride is dialyzable (with a clearance of up to 170 mL/min under good hemodynamic conditions), prompt hemodialysis is recommended to correct the acidosis and remove the accumulated metformin. Such management often results in prompt reversal of symptoms and recovery [see Contraindications (4); Warnings and Precautions (5.6, 5.7, 5.10, 5.11, 5.12)]. 5.2 Pancreatitis There have been postmarketing reports of acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis, in patients taking JANUMET. After initiation of JANUMET, patients should be observed carefully for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis. If pancreatitis is suspected, JANUMET should promptly be discontinued and appropriate management should be initiated. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for the development of pancreatitis while using JANUMET. 5.3 Impaired Hepatic Function Since impaired hepatic function has been associated with some cases of lactic acidosis, JANUMET should generally be avoided in patients with clinical or laboratory evidence of hepatic disease. 5.4 Assessment of Renal Function Metformin and sitagliptin are known to be substantially excreted by the kidney. Metformin hydrochloride The risk of metformin accumulation and lactic acidosis increases with the degree of impairment of renal function. Therefore, JANUMET is contraindicated in patients with renal impairment. Before initiation of JANUMET and at least annually thereafter, renal function should be assessed and verified as normal. In patients in whom development of renal dysfunction is anticipated (e.g., elderly), renal function should be assessed more frequently and JANUMET discontinued if evidence of renal impairment is present. Sitagliptin There have been postmarketing reports of worsening renal function, including acute renal failure, sometimes requiring dialysis. Before initiation of therapy with JANUMET and at least annually thereafter, renal function should be assessed and verified as normal. In patients in whom development of renal dysfunction is anticipated, particularly in elderly patients, renal function should be assessed more frequently and JANUMET discontinued if evidence of renal impairment is present. 5.5 Vitamin B12 Levels In controlled clinical trials of metformin of 29 weeks duration, a decrease to subnormal levels of previously normal serum Vitamin B12 levels, without clinical manifestations, was observed in approximately 7% of patients. Such decrease, possibly due to interference with B12 absorption from the B12-intrinsic factor complex, is, however, very rarely associated with anemia and appears to be rapidly reversible with discontinuation of metformin or Vitamin B12 supplementation. Measurement of hematologic parameters on an annual basis is advised in patients on JANUMET and any apparent abnormalities should be appropriately investigated and managed. [See Adverse Reactions (6.1).] Certain individuals (those with inadequate Vitamin B12 or calcium intake or absorption) appear to be predisposed to developing subnormal Vitamin B12 levels. In these patients, routine serum Vitamin B12 measurements at two- to three-year intervals may be useful. 5.6 Alcohol Intake Alcohol is known to potentiate the effect of metformin on lactate metabolism. Patients, therefore, should be warned against excessive alcohol intake, acute or chronic, while receiving JANUMET. 5.7 Surgical Procedures Use of JANUMET should be temporarily suspended for any surgical procedure (except minor procedures not associated with restricted intake of food and fluids) and should not be restarted until the patient's oral intake has resumed and renal function has been evaluated as normal. 5.8 Change in Clinical Status of Patients with Previously Controlled Type 2 Diabetes A patient with type 2 diabetes previously well controlled on JANUMET who develops laboratory abnormalities or clinical illness (especially vague and poorly defined illness) should be evaluated promptly for evidence of ketoacidosis or lactic acidosis. Evaluation should include serum electrolytes and ketones, blood glucose and, if indicated, blood pH, lactate, pyruvate, and metformin levels. If acidosis of either form occurs, JANUMET must be stopped immediately and other appropriate corrective measures initiated. 5.9 Use with Medications Known to Cause Hypoglycemia Sitagliptin When sitagliptin was used in combination with a sulfonylurea or with insulin, medications known to cause hypoglycemia, the incidence of hypoglycemia was increased over that of placebo used in combination with a sulfonylurea or with insulin [see Adverse Reactions (6)]. Therefore, patients also receiving an insulin secretagogue (e.g., sulfonylurea) or insulin may require a lower dose of the insulin secretagogue or insulin to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)]. Metformin hydrochloride Hypoglycemia does not occur in patients receiving metformin alone under usual circumstances of use, but could occur when caloric intake is deficient, when strenuous exercise is not compensated by caloric supplementation, or during concomitant use with other glucose-lowering agents (such as sulfonylureas and insulin) or ethanol. Elderly, debilitated, or malnourished patients, and those with adrenal or pituitary insufficiency or alcohol intoxication are particularly susceptible to hypoglycemic effects. Hypoglycemia may be difficult to recognize in the elderly, and in people who are taking β-adrenergic blocking drugs. 5.10 Concomitant Medications Affecting Renal Function or Metformin Disposition Concomitant medication(s) that may affect renal function or result in significant hemodynamic change or may interfere with the disposition of metformin, such as cationic drugs that are eliminated by renal tubular secretion [see Drug Interactions (7.2)], should be used with caution. 5.11 Radiologic Studies with Intravascular Iodinated Contrast Materials Intravascular contrast studies with iodinated materials (for example, intravenous urogram, intravenous cholangiography, angiography, and computed tomography (CT) scans with intravascular contrast materials) can lead to acute alteration of renal function and have been associated with lactic acidosis in patients receiving metformin [see Contraindications (4)]. Therefore, in patients in whom any such study is planned, JANUMET should be temporarily discontinued at the time of or prior to the procedure, and withheld for 48 hours subsequent to the procedure and reinstituted only after renal function has been re-evaluated and found to be normal. 5.12 Hypoxic States Cardiovascular collapse (shock) from whatever cause, acute congestive heart failure, acute myocardial infarction and other conditions characterized by hypoxemia have been associated with lactic acidosis and may also cause prerenal azotemia. When such events occur in patients on JANUMET therapy, the drug should be promptly discontinued. 5.13 Loss of Control of Blood Glucose When a patient stabilized on any diabetic regimen is exposed to stress such as fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, a temporary loss of glycemic control may occur. At such times, it may be necessary to withhold JANUMET and temporarily administer insulin. JANUMET may be reinstituted after the acute episode is resolved. 5.14 Hypersensitivity Reactions There have been postmarketing reports of serious hypersensitivity reactions in patients treated with sitagliptin, one of the components of JANUMET. These reactions include anaphylaxis, angioedema, and exfoliative skin conditions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Onset of these reactions occurred within the first 3 months after initiation of treatment with sitagliptin, with some reports occurring after the first dose. If a hypersensitivity reaction is suspected, discontinue JANUMET, assess for other potential causes for the event, and institute alternative treatment for diabetes. [See Adverse Reactions (6.2).] Angioedema has also been reported with other dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. Use caution in a patient with a history of angioedema with another DPP-4 inhibitor because it is unknown whether such patients will be predisposed to angioedema with JANUMET. 5.15 Severe and Disabling Arthralgia There have been postmarketing reports of severe and disabling arthralgia in patients taking DPP-4 inhibitors. The time to onset of symptoms following initiation of drug therapy varied from one day to years. Patients experienced relief of symptoms upon discontinuation of the medication. A subset of patients experienced a recurrence of symptoms when restarting the same drug or a different DPP-4 inhibitor. Consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause for severe joint pain and discontinue drug if appropriate. 5.16 Macrovascular Outcomes There have been no clinical studies establishing conclusive evidence of macrovascular risk reduction with JANUMET or any other anti-diabetic drug.
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The most common adverse reactions reported in ≥5% of patients simultaneously started on sitagliptin and metformin and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo were diarrhea, upper respiratory tract infection, and headache. (6.1) Adverse reactions reported in ≥5% of patients treated with sitagliptin in combination with sulfonylurea and metformin and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo in combination with sulfonylurea and metformin were hypoglycemia and headache. (6.1) Hypoglycemia was the only adverse reaction reported in ≥5% of patients treated with sitagliptin in combination with insulin and metformin and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo in combination with insulin and metformin. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., at 1-877-888-4231 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Sitagliptin and Metformin Coadministration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled on Diet and Exercise Table 1 summarizes the most common (≥5% of patients) adverse reactions reported (regardless of investigator assessment of causality) in a 24-week placebo-controlled factorial study in which sitagliptin and metformin were coadministered to patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on diet and exercise. Table 1: Sitagliptin and Metformin Coadministered to Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled on Diet and Exercise: Adverse Reactions Reported (Regardless of Investigator Assessment of Causality) in ≥5% of Patients Receiving Combination Therapy (and Greater than in Patients Receiving Placebo)Intent-to-treat population. Number of Patients (%) Placebo Sitagliptin 100 mg once daily Metformin 500 mg/ Metformin 1000 mg twice dailyData pooled for the patients given the lower and higher doses of metformin. Sitagliptin 50 mg twice daily + Metformin 500 mg/ Metformin 1000 mg twice daily N = 176 N = 179 N = 364 N = 372 Diarrhea 7 (4.0) 5 (2.8) 28 (7.7) 28 (7.5) Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 9 (5.1) 8 (4.5) 19 (5.2) 23 (6.2) Headache 5 (2.8) 2 (1.1) 14 (3.8) 22 (5.9) Sitagliptin Add-on Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled on Metformin Alone In a 24-week placebo-controlled trial of sitagliptin 100 mg administered once daily added to a twice daily metformin regimen, there were no adverse reactions reported regardless of investigator assessment of causality in ≥5% of patients and more commonly than in patients given placebo. Discontinuation of therapy due to clinical adverse reactions was similar to the placebo treatment group (sitagliptin and metformin, 1.9%; placebo and metformin, 2.5%). Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions The incidences of pre-selected gastrointestinal adverse experiences in patients treated with sitagliptin and metformin were similar to those reported for patients treated with metformin alone. See Table 2. Table 2: Pre-selected Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions (Regardless of Investigator Assessment of Causality) Reported in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Receiving Sitagliptin and Metformin Number of Patients (%) Study of Sitagliptin and Metformin in Patients Inadequately Controlled on Diet and Exercise Study of Sitagliptin Add-on in Patients Inadequately Controlled on Metformin Alone Placebo Sitagliptin 100 mg once daily Metformin 500 mg/ Metformin 1000 mg twice dailyData pooled for the patients given the lower and higher doses of metformin. Sitagliptin 50 mg twice daily + Metformin 500 mg/ Metformin 1000 mg twice daily Placebo and Metformin ≥1500 mg daily Sitagliptin 100 mg once daily and Metformin ≥1500 mg daily N = 176 N = 179 N = 364 N = 372 N = 237 N = 464 Diarrhea 7 (4.0) 5 (2.8) 28 (7.7) 28 (7.5) 6 (2.5) 11 (2.4) Nausea 2 (1.1) 2 (1.1) 20 (5.5) 18 (4.8) 2 (0.8) 6 (1.3) Vomiting 1 (0.6) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.5) 8 (2.2) 2 (0.8) 5 (1.1) Abdominal PainAbdominal discomfort was included in the analysis of abdominal pain in the study of initial therapy. 4 (2.3) 6 (3.4) 14 (3.8) 11 (3.0) 9 (3.8) 10 (2.2) Sitagliptin in Combination with Metformin and Glimepiride In a 24-week placebo-controlled study of sitagliptin 100 mg as add-on therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin and glimepiride (sitagliptin, N=116; placebo, N=113), the adverse reactions reported regardless of investigator assessment of causality in ≥5% of patients treated with sitagliptin and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo were: hypoglycemia (Table 3) and headache (6.9%, 2.7%). Sitagliptin in Combination with Metformin and Rosiglitazone In a placebo-controlled study of sitagliptin 100 mg as add-on therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin and rosiglitazone (sitagliptin, N=181; placebo, N=97), the adverse reactions reported regardless of investigator assessment of causality through Week 18 in ≥5% of patients treated with sitagliptin and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo were: upper respiratory tract infection (sitagliptin, 5.5%; placebo, 5.2%) and nasopharyngitis (6.1%, 4.1%). Through Week 54, the adverse reactions reported regardless of investigator assessment of causality in ≥5% of patients treated with sitagliptin and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo were: upper respiratory tract infection (sitagliptin, 15.5%; placebo, 6.2%), nasopharyngitis (11.0%, 9.3%), peripheral edema (8.3%, 5.2%), and headache (5.5%, 4.1%). Sitagliptin in Combination with Metformin and Insulin In a 24-week placebo-controlled study of sitagliptin 100 mg as add-on therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin and insulin (sitagliptin, N=229; placebo, N=233), the only adverse reaction reported regardless of investigator assessment of causality in ≥5% of patients treated with sitagliptin and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo was hypoglycemia (Table 3). Hypoglycemia In all (N=5) studies, adverse reactions of hypoglycemia were based on all reports of symptomatic hypoglycemia; a concurrent glucose measurement was not required although most (77%) reports of hypoglycemia were accompanied by a blood glucose measurement ≤70 mg/dL. When the combination of sitagliptin and metformin was coadministered with a sulfonylurea or with insulin, the percentage of patients reporting at least one adverse reaction of hypoglycemia was higher than that observed with placebo and metformin coadministered with a sulfonylurea or with insulin (Table 3). Table 3: Incidence and Rate of HypoglycemiaAdverse reactions of hypoglycemia were based on all reports of symptomatic hypoglycemia; a concurrent glucose measurement was not required: Intent-to-treat population. (Regardless of Investigator Assessment of Causality) in Placebo-Controlled Clinical Studies of Sitagliptin in Combination with Metformin Coadministered with Glimepiride or Insulin Add-On to Glimepiride + Metformin (24 weeks) Sitagliptin 100 mg + Metformin + Glimepiride Placebo + Metformin + Glimepiride N = 116 N = 113 Overall (%) 19 (16.4) 1 (0.9) Rate (episodes/patient-year)Based on total number of events (i.e., a single patient may have had multiple events). 0.82 0.02 Severe (%)Severe events of hypoglycemia were defined as those events requiring medical assistance or exhibiting depressed level/loss of consciousness or seizure. 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) Add-On to Insulin + Metformin (24 weeks) Sitagliptin 100 mg + Metformin + Insulin Placebo + Metformin + Insulin N = 229 N = 233 Overall (%) 35 (15.3) 19 (8.2) Rate (episodes/patient-year) 0.98 0.61 Severe (%) 1 (0.4) 1 (0.4) The overall incidence of reported adverse reactions of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on diet and exercise was 0.6% in patients given placebo, 0.6% in patients given sitagliptin alone, 0.8% in patients given metformin alone, and 1.6% in patients given sitagliptin in combination with metformin. In patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin alone, the overall incidence of adverse reactions of hypoglycemia was 1.3% in patients given add-on sitagliptin and 2.1% in patients given add-on placebo. In the study of sitagliptin and add-on combination therapy with metformin and rosiglitazone, the overall incidence of hypoglycemia was 2.2% in patients given add-on sitagliptin and 0.0% in patients given add-on placebo through Week 18. Through Week 54, the overall incidence of hypoglycemia was 3.9% in patients given add-on sitagliptin and 1.0% in patients given add-on placebo. Vital Signs and Electrocardiograms With the combination of sitagliptin and metformin, no clinically meaningful changes in vital signs or in ECG (including in QTc interval) were observed. Pancreatitis In a pooled analysis of 19 double-blind clinical trials that included data from 10,246 patients randomized to receive sitagliptin 100 mg/day (N=5429) or corresponding (active or placebo) control (N=4817), the incidence of acute pancreatitis was 0.1 per 100 patient-years in each group (4 patients with an event in 4708 patient-years for sitagliptin and 4 patients with an event in 3942 patient-years for control) [See Warnings and Precautions (5.2).] Sitagliptin The most common adverse experience in sitagliptin monotherapy reported regardless of investigator assessment of causality in ≥5% of patients and more commonly than in patients given placebo was nasopharyngitis. Metformin hydrochloride The most common (>5%) established adverse reactions due to initiation of metformin therapy are diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, flatulence, abdominal discomfort, indigestion, asthenia, and headache. Laboratory Tests Sitagliptin The incidence of laboratory adverse reactions was similar in patients treated with sitagliptin and metformin (7.6%) compared to patients treated with placebo and metformin (8.7%). In most but not all studies, a small increase in white blood cell count (approximately 200 cells/microL difference in WBC vs placebo; mean baseline WBC approximately 6600 cells/microL) was observed due to a small increase in neutrophils. This change in laboratory parameters is not considered to be clinically relevant. Metformin hydrochloride In controlled clinical trials of metformin of 29 weeks duration, a decrease to subnormal levels of previously normal serum Vitamin B12 levels, without clinical manifestations, was observed in approximately 7% of patients. Such decrease, possibly due to interference with B12 absorption from the B12-intrinsic factor complex, is, however, very rarely associated with anemia and appears to be rapidly reversible with discontinuation of metformin or Vitamin B12 supplementation. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.5).] 6.2 Postmarketing Experience Additional adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of JANUMET or sitagliptin, one of the components of JANUMET. These reactions have been reported when JANUMET or sitagliptin have been used alone and/or in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is generally not possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis, angioedema, rash, urticaria, cutaneous vasculitis, and exfoliative skin conditions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14)]; upper respiratory tract infection; hepatic enzyme elevations; acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic and necrotizing pancreatitis [see Indications and Usage (1); Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]; worsening renal function, including acute renal failure (sometimes requiring dialysis) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]; severe and disabling arthralgia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15)]; constipation; vomiting; headache; myalgia; pain in extremity; back pain; pruritus; pemphigoid.
7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Cationic drugs eliminated by renal tubular secretion: Use with caution. (5.10, 7.2) 7.1 Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors Topiramate or other carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (e.g., zonisamide, acetazolamide or dichlorphenamide) frequently decrease serum bicarbonate and induce non-anion gap, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Concomitant use of these drugs may induce metabolic acidosis. Use these drugs with caution in patients treated with JANUMET, as the risk of lactic acidosis may increase. 7.2 Cationic Drugs Cationic drugs (e.g., amiloride, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, quinine, ranitidine, triamterene, trimethoprim, or vancomycin) that are eliminated by renal tubular secretion theoretically have the potential for interaction with metformin by competing for common renal tubular transport systems. Although such interactions remain theoretical (except for cimetidine), careful patient monitoring and dose adjustment of JANUMET and/or the interfering drug is recommended in patients who are taking cationic medications that are excreted via the proximal renal tubular secretory system. 7.3 The Use of Metformin with Other Drugs Certain drugs tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. These drugs include the thiazides and other diuretics, corticosteroids, phenothiazines, thyroid products, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenytoin, nicotinic acid, sympathomimetics, calcium channel blocking drugs, and isoniazid. When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving JANUMET the patient should be closely observed to maintain adequate glycemic control.
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Safety and effectiveness of JANUMET in children under 18 years have not been established. (8.4) There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. To report drug exposure during pregnancy call 1-800-986-8999. (8.1) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category B: JANUMET There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women with JANUMET or its individual components; therefore, the safety of JANUMET in pregnant women is not known. JANUMET should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., maintains a registry to monitor the pregnancy outcomes of women exposed to JANUMET while pregnant. Health care providers are encouraged to report any prenatal exposure to JANUMET by calling the Pregnancy Registry at 1-800-986-8999. No animal studies have been conducted with the combined products in JANUMET to evaluate effects on reproduction. The following data are based on findings in studies performed with sitagliptin or metformin individually. Sitagliptin Reproduction studies have been performed in rats and rabbits. Doses of sitagliptin up to 125 mg/kg (approximately 12 times the human exposure at the maximum recommended human dose) did not impair fertility or harm the fetus. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies with sitagliptin in pregnant women. Sitagliptin administered to pregnant female rats and rabbits from gestation day 6 to 20 (organogenesis) was not teratogenic at oral doses up to 250 mg/kg (rats) and 125 mg/kg (rabbits), or approximately 30 and 20 times human exposure at the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 100 mg/day based on AUC comparisons. Higher doses increased the incidence of rib malformations in offspring at 1000 mg/kg, or approximately 100 times human exposure at the MRHD. Sitagliptin administered to female rats from gestation day 6 to lactation day 21 decreased body weight in male and female offspring at 1000 mg/kg. No functional or behavioral toxicity was observed in offspring of rats. Placental transfer of sitagliptin administered to pregnant rats was approximately 45% at 2 hours and 80% at 24 hours postdose. Placental transfer of sitagliptin administered to pregnant rabbits was approximately 66% at 2 hours and 30% at 24 hours. Metformin hydrochloride Metformin was not teratogenic in rats and rabbits at doses up to 600 mg/kg/day. This represents an exposure of about 2 and 6 times the maximum recommended human daily dose of 2,000 mg based on body surface area comparisons for rats and rabbits, respectively. Determination of fetal concentrations demonstrated a partial placental barrier to metformin. 8.3 Nursing Mothers No studies in lactating animals have been conducted with the combined components of JANUMET. In studies performed with the individual components, both sitagliptin and metformin are secreted in the milk of lactating rats. It is not known whether sitagliptin is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when JANUMET is administered to a nursing woman. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of JANUMET in pediatric patients under 18 years have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use JANUMET Because sitagliptin and metformin are substantially excreted by the kidney, and because aging can be associated with reduced renal function, JANUMET should be used with caution as age increases. Care should be taken in dose selection and should be based on careful and regular monitoring of renal function. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.4); Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).] Sitagliptin Of the total number of subjects (N=3884) in Phase II and III clinical studies of sitagliptin, 725 patients were 65 years and over, while 61 patients were 75 years and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between subjects 65 years and over and younger subjects. While this and other reported clinical experience have not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. Metformin hydrochloride Controlled clinical studies of metformin did not include sufficient numbers of elderly patients to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients, although other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and young patients. Metformin should only be used in patients with normal renal function. The initial and maintenance dosing of metformin should be conservative in patients with advanced age, due to the potential for decreased renal function in this population. Any dose adjustment should be based on a careful assessment of renal function. [See Contraindications (4); Warnings and Precautions (5.4); Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).]

Save on the cost of Janumet

With Our Janumet Discount Card

Be sure to ask your pharmacist not to substitute another card for ours as we are confident we offer the highest savings possible.

Medication Discount Card Medication Discount Card
Frequently Asked Questions

There are no catches to this. Simply print the card, take it to your pharmacy, and save. If you still have questions just read below...

How Do I Know My Pharmacy Will Accept It?
That's simple. The card is accepted at ALL CHAIN PHARMACIES such as CVS, Rite Aid, and Walgreens. If you don't know if your pharmacy accepts the card simply call them and give them the BIN and PCN numbers on the card. The card is accepted at most pharmacies. If you call a few one is sure to accept it.
Can I Use This In Conjunction With My Insurance?
No, unfortunately insurance companies don't allow "double-savings". However, if your insurance does not cover certain drugs (ex - cosmetic drugs, brand names, prenatal vitamins, etc) then this card may save you money. Also if your insurance requires you to pay a deductible on your brand name drugs before covering them, then this card may also provider greater savings!
How Much Will This Card Save Me?
You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
This Sounds Too Good To Be True. Is This A Scam?
Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
My Pharmacy Isn't Included. Can They Participate?
Yes! There are pharmacies who accept the pharmacy savings card that are not on our list. If you find one please email us and we'll update the list. If they are not a current partner and are interested, email us and we'll contact them to try and convince them to participate. You may also choose to call around and see if someone else in your area accepts it.
Is this the same as a Janumet copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
Savings of 70%!
I want to thank you for your prescription card. My thyroid medicine was going to cost me $118 a month. Well, naturally, I thought of your card. Your site said for my 240 tablets a month it would be about $36. A savings of $82, or roughly 70%. Thank you for the relief your card has previously given to me now and in the past. - J. Donaldson
Savings of over $200!
Thank you for putting the medication discount card on the internet. I saved over 200 dollars On my prescription. I would have never been able to afford it had it not been for this product. Again I cannot thank you enough and keep up the good work!! - M. Axler
Savings of over 50%!
I had printed out 3 different discount cards on the internet and asked the pharmacist to check prices. The lowest price was $289. I searched the internet some more, I found this site, gave the pharmacy your card and the cost was $130. What a big savings, I can't thank this site enough. - Linda S.

Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

Accepted At Over 59,000 Pharmacies Nationwide!

Including...
  • Including...
  • Cub Pharmacy
  • Kmart
  • HEB
  • Target
  • Winn Dixie
  • Costco
  • Safeway
  • Kroger
  • Tom Thumb
  • CVS
  • Brookshire`s
  • Rite Aid
  • Fred`s Pharmacy
  • Walmart
  • Long Drugs
  • Walgreens
  • Giant
  • Save Mart Pharmacy
  • Fred Meyer
  • We Care Pharmacy
  • Albertsons

And thousands of independent pharmacies nationwide!

Sitagliptin/metformin (trade name Janumet) is an anti-diabetic drug, being a combination drug of sitagliptin (a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor) and metformin.

Wikipedia contributors. "Janumet" Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Jul 1, 2012. Web. Jul 6, 2012.

Janumet Coupon

Currently we do not have any available, however you can receive an instant discount at your pharmacy with our Janumet discount card. Create one instantly

Important Note

The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

This Janumet discount should not be confused with a Janumet coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

MedicationDiscountCard.com offers Average Savings of
60.04%
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"When I first used my card, both the pharmacist and I were amazed! She took the information from it for herself and then compared the costs to what my prices would have been had I gone through my insurance (I had none at the time I 1st used my card), and I still saved a lot of money!! They entered the new info. into their system and in the meantime I`ve told lots of friends and family members about how to save.....THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH!!!!!" - Elizabeth H.
Save up to 75% on your medication
Save up to 75% on your medication