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Looking for a Pradaxa Coupon?

Save Up To 75% With This Pradaxa Discount Card!

Estimated Savings Of Over $9,863,395
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Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Pradaxa discount card helps you save money on the exact same Pradaxa prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Pradaxa prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

Pradaxa

Pradaxa is used to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (blood clots in the lungs). Using a Pradaxa coupon can save you money on the cost of this prescription.

 

How It Works

The blood clotting process is a complex mechanism that the body uses to prevent blood loss. Sometimes that process can go awry, causing conditions like DVT and pulmonary embolism. Pradaxa is in a class of medication called direct thrombin inhibitors, and works by reducing the body's ability to form blood clots as quickly.

 

Dosage

Pradaxa is available as a capsule. It is usually prescribed twice a day, with or without food. It should be taken at the same times each day. Never open or split a capsule. Never stop taking your medication without consulting your physician. Always follow your prescription exactly as written by your doctor.

 

Side Effects and Safety Precautions

Speak to your doctor about the risks of Pradaxa, related to certain heart conditions and those prone to strokes. Pradaxa has a list of possible side effects. These include: upset stomach, nausea, heartburn, and stomach pain. Report these to your doctor if they are severe or persistent. Some possible severe side effects include: weakness, rash, hives, itching, bleeding from a cut that lasts a long time, bleeding from the gums, coughing up blood, red/black/tarry stools, pink/brown urine, difficulty swallowing, and unusual bleeding/bruising. If you experience any of these symptoms, seek emergency medical care.

 

Sources

"Pradaxa." MedicineNet.com. 2015. Accessed 10 July. 2015.

"Pradaxa." Medline Plus. 2015. Accessed 10 July. 2015.

TALKED ABOUT IN
  • ABC
  • NBC
  • FOX
  • CBS
  • San Francisco Chronicle
  • About.com
  • CIO
  • Boston.com
Estimated Savings Of Over $9,863,395

Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Pradaxa discount card helps you save money on the exact same Pradaxa prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Pradaxa prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

Pradaxa

Pradaxa is used to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (blood clots in the lungs). Using a Pradaxa coupon can save you money on the cost of this prescription.

 

How It Works

The blood clotting process is a complex mechanism that the body uses to prevent blood loss. Sometimes that process can go awry, causing conditions like DVT and pulmonary embolism. Pradaxa is in a class of medication called direct thrombin inhibitors, and works by reducing the body's ability to form blood clots as quickly.

 

Dosage

Pradaxa is available as a capsule. It is usually prescribed twice a day, with or without food. It should be taken at the same times each day. Never open or split a capsule. Never stop taking your medication without consulting your physician. Always follow your prescription exactly as written by your doctor.

 

Side Effects and Safety Precautions

Speak to your doctor about the risks of Pradaxa, related to certain heart conditions and those prone to strokes. Pradaxa has a list of possible side effects. These include: upset stomach, nausea, heartburn, and stomach pain. Report these to your doctor if they are severe or persistent. Some possible severe side effects include: weakness, rash, hives, itching, bleeding from a cut that lasts a long time, bleeding from the gums, coughing up blood, red/black/tarry stools, pink/brown urine, difficulty swallowing, and unusual bleeding/bruising. If you experience any of these symptoms, seek emergency medical care.

 

Sources

"Pradaxa." MedicineNet.com. 2015. Accessed 10 July. 2015.

"Pradaxa." Medline Plus. 2015. Accessed 10 July. 2015.

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Pradaxa prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Pradaxa safely and effectively.
Before taking Pradaxa please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Pradaxa.
WARNING: (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS, (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including PRADAXA, increases the risk of thrombotic events. If anticoagulation with PRADAXA is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy, consider coverage with another anticoagulant [see Dosage and Administration (2.4, 2.5, 2.6) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA Epidural or spinal hematomas may occur in patients treated with PRADAXA who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. These hematomas may result in long-term or permanent paralysis. Consider these risks when scheduling patients for spinal procedures. Factors that can increase the risk of developing epidural or spinal hematomas in these patients include: • use of indwelling epidural catheters • concomitant use of other drugs that affect hemostasis, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), platelet inhibitors, other anticoagulants • a history of traumatic or repeated epidural or spinal punctures • a history of spinal deformity or spinal surgery • optimal timing between the administration of PRADAXA and neuraxial procedures is not known [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. Monitor patients frequently for signs and symptoms of neurological impairment. If neurological compromise is noted, urgent treatment is necessary [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. Consider the benefits and risks before neuraxial intervention in patients anticoagulated or to be anticoagulated [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. WARNING: (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS, and (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS: Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including PRADAXA, increases the risk of thrombotic events. To reduce this risk, consider coverage with another anticoagulant if PRADAXA is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy (2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 5.1). (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA: Epidural or spinal hematomas may occur in patients treated with PRADAXA who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. These hematomas may result in long-term or permanent paralysis (5.3). Monitor patients frequently for signs and symptoms of neurological impairment and if observed, treat urgently. Consider the benefits and risks before neuraxial intervention in patients who are or who need to be anticoagulated (5.3).
Boxed Warning 4/2014
Indications and Usage (1.1, 1.2, 1.3) 4/2014
Dosage and Administration (2.1, 2.2) 1/2015
Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.3, 5.5) 4/2014
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE PRADAXA is a direct thrombin inhibitor indicated: To reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (1.1) For the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for 5-10 days (1.2) To reduce the risk of recurrence of DVT and PE in patients who have been previously treated (1.3) 1.1 Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation PRADAXA is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. 1.2 Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism PRADAXA is indicated for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for 5-10 days. 1.3 Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism PRADAXA is indicated to reduce the risk of recurrence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients who have been previously treated.
Indication Dosage
Reduction in Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular AF CrCl >30 mL/min: 150 mg twice daily
CrCl 15 to 30 mL/min: 75 mg twice daily
CrCl <15 mL/min or on dialysis: Dosing recommendations cannot be provided
CrCl 30 to 50 mL/min with concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors: Consider reducing dose to 75 mg twice daily if given with P-gp inhibitors dronedarone or ketoconazole. Dose adjustment is not necessary when co-administered with other P-gp inhibitors
CrCl <30 mL/min with concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors: Avoid co-administration
Treatment of DVT and PE Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT and PE CrCl >30 mL/min: 150 mg twice daily
CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis: Dosing recommendations cannot be provided
CrCl <50 mL/min with concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors: Avoid co-administration
3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS 150 mg capsules with a light blue opaque cap imprinted in black with the Boehringer Ingelheim company symbol and a cream-colored opaque body imprinted in black with "R150". 75 mg capsules with a cream-colored opaque cap imprinted in black with the Boehringer Ingelheim company symbol and a cream-colored opaque body imprinted in black with "R75". Capsules: 75 mg and 150 mg (3)
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS PRADAXA is contraindicated in patients with: Active pathological bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Adverse Reactions (6.1)] . History of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to PRADAXA (e.g., anaphylactic reaction or anaphylactic shock) [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)] . Mechanical prosthetic heart valve [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] Active pathological bleeding (4) History of serious hypersensitivity reaction to PRADAXA (4) Mechanical prosthetic heart valve (4)
5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Bleeding: PRADAXA can cause serious and fatal bleeding (5.2) Bioprosthetic heart valves: PRADAXA use not recommended (5.4) 5.1 Increased Risk of Thrombotic Events after Premature Discontinuation Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including PRADAXA, in the absence of adequate alternative anticoagulation increases the risk of thrombotic events. If PRADAXA is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy, consider coverage with another anticoagulant [see Dosage and Administration (2.4, 2.5, 2.6)]. 5.2 Risk of Bleeding PRADAXA increases the risk of bleeding and can cause significant and, sometimes, fatal bleeding. Promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of blood loss (e.g., a drop in hemoglobin and/or hematocrit or hypotension). Discontinue PRADAXA in patients with active pathological bleeding [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)] . Risk factors for bleeding include the concomitant use of other drugs that increase the risk of bleeding (e.g., anti-platelet agents, heparin, fibrinolytic therapy, and chronic use of NSAIDs). PRADAXA’s anticoagulant activity and half-life are increased in patients with renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)] . Reversal of Anticoagulant Effect: A specific reversal agent for dabigatran is not available. Hemodialysis can remove dabigatran; however the clinical experience supporting the use of hemodialysis as a treatment for bleeding is limited [see Overdosage (10)]. Activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCCs, e.g., FEIBA), or recombinant Factor VIIa, or concentrates of coagulation factors II, IX or X may be considered but their use has not been evaluated in clinical trials. Protamine sulfate and vitamin K are not expected to affect the anticoagulant activity of dabigatran. Consider administration of platelet concentrates in cases where thrombocytopenia is present or long-acting antiplatelet drugs have been used. 5.3 Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia or Puncture When neuraxial anesthesia (spinal/epidural anesthesia) or spinal puncture is employed, patients treated with anticoagulant agents are at risk of developing an epidural or spinal hematoma which can result in long-term or permanent paralysis [see Boxed Warning]. To reduce the potential risk of bleeding associated with the concurrent use of dabigatran and epidural or spinal anesthesia/analgesia or spinal puncture, consider the pharmacokinetic profile of dabigatran [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Placement or removal of an epidural catheter or lumbar puncture is best performed when the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran is low; however, the exact timing to reach a sufficiently low anticoagulant effect in each patient is not known. Should the physician decide to administer anticoagulation in the context of epidural or spinal anesthesia/analgesia or lumbar puncture, monitor frequently to detect any signs or symptoms of neurological impairment, such as midline back pain, sensory and motor deficits (numbness, tingling, or weakness in lower limbs), bowel and/or bladder dysfunction. Instruct patients to immediately report if they experience any of the above signs or symptoms. If signs or symptoms of spinal hematoma are suspected, initiate urgent diagnosis and treatment including consideration for spinal cord decompression even though such treatment may not prevent or reverse neurological sequelae. 5.4 Thromboembolic and Bleeding Events in Patients with Prosthetic Heart Valves The safety and efficacy of PRADAXA in patients with bileaflet mechanical prosthetic heart valves was evaluated in the RE-ALIGN trial, in which patients with bileaflet mechanical prosthetic heart valves (recently implanted or implanted more than three months prior to enrollment) were randomized to dose adjusted warfarin or 150, 220, or 300 mg of PRADAXA twice a day. RE-ALIGN was terminated early due to the occurrence of significantly more thromboembolic events (valve thrombosis, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and myocardial infarction) and an excess of major bleeding (predominantly post-operative pericardial effusions requiring intervention for hemodynamic compromise) in the PRADAXA treatment arm as compared to the warfarin treatment arm. These bleeding and thromboembolic events were seen both in patients who were initiated on PRADAXA post-operatively within three days of mechanical bileaflet valve implantation, as well as in patients whose valves had been implanted more than three months prior to enrollment. Therefore, the use of PRADAXA is contraindicated in patients with mechanical prosthetic valves [see Contraindications (4)]. The use of PRADAXA for the prophylaxis of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation in the setting of other forms of valvular heart disease, including the presence of a bioprosthetic heart valve, has not been studied and is not recommended. 5.5 Effect of P-gp Inducers and Inhibitors on Dabigatran Exposure The concomitant use of PRADAXA with P-gp inducers (e.g., rifampin) reduces exposure to dabigatran and should generally be avoided [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. P-gp inhibition and impaired renal function are the major independent factors that result in increased exposure to dabigatran [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors in patients with renal impairment is expected to produce increased exposure of dabigatran compared to that seen with either factor alone. Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation Consider reducing the dose of PRADAXA to 75 mg twice daily when dronedarone or systemic ketoconazole is coadministered with PRADAXA in patients with moderate renal impairment (CrCl 30-50 mL/min). Avoid use of PRADAXA and P-gp inhibitors in patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl 15-30 mL/min) [see Drug Interactions (7.1) and Use in Specific Populations (8.6)]. Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Avoid use of PRADAXA and concomitant P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Drug Interactions (7.2) and Use in Specific Populations (8.6)].
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The most serious adverse reactions reported with PRADAXA were related to bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Most common adverse reactions (>15%) are gastritis-like symptoms and bleeding (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. at (800) 542-6257 or (800) 459-9906 TTY or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch . 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reactions rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation The RE-LY (Randomized Evaluation of Long-term Anticoagulant Therapy) study provided safety information on the use of two doses of PRADAXA and warfarin [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The numbers of patients and their exposures are described in Table 1. Limited information is presented on the 110 mg dosing arm because this dose is not approved. Table 1 Summary of Treatment Exposure in RE-LY PRADAXA 110 mg twice daily PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily Warfarin Total number treated 5983 6059 5998 Exposure > 12 months 4936 4939 5193 > 24 months 2387 2405 2470 Mean exposure (months) 20.5 20.3 21.3 Total patient-years 10,242 10,261 10,659 Drug Discontinuation in RE-LY The rates of adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation were 21% for PRADAXA 150 mg and 16% for warfarin. The most frequent adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of PRADAXA were bleeding and gastrointestinal events (i.e., dyspepsia, nausea, upper abdominal pain, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and diarrhea). Bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Table 2 shows the number of patients experiencing serious bleeding during the treatment period in the RE-LY study, with the bleeding rate per 100 patient-years (%). Major bleeds fulfilled one or more of the following criteria: bleeding associated with a reduction in hemoglobin of at least 2 grams per deciliter or leading to a transfusion of at least 2 units of blood, or symptomatic bleeding in a critical area or organ (intraocular, intracranial, intraspinal or intramuscular with compartment syndrome, retroperitoneal bleeding, intra-articular bleeding, or pericardial bleeding). A life-threatening bleed met one or more of the following criteria: fatal, symptomatic intracranial bleed, reduction in hemoglobin of at least 5 grams per deciliter, transfusion of at least 4 units of blood, associated with hypotension requiring the use of intravenous inotropic agents, or necessitating surgical intervention. Intracranial hemorrhage included intracerebral (hemorrhagic stroke), subarachnoid, and subdural bleeds. Table 2 Bleeding Events* (per 100 Patient-Years) * Patients contributed multiple events and events were counted in multiple categories. ** Confidence interval PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily N (%) Warfarin N (%) Hazard Ratio (95% CI**) Randomized patients 6076 6022 Patient-years 12,033 11,794 Intracranial hemorrhage 39 (0.3) 91 (0.8) 0.42 (0.29, 0.61) Life-threatening bleed 183 (1.5) 221 (1.9) 0.81 (0.67, 0.99) Major bleed 409 (3.4) 426 (3.6) 0.94 (0.82, 1.08) Any bleed 1997 (16.6) 2169 (18.4) 0.91 (0.85, 0.96) The risk of major bleeds was similar with PRADAXA 150 mg and warfarin across major subgroups defined by baseline characteristics, with the exception of age, where there was a trend towards a higher incidence of major bleeding on PRADAXA (hazard ratio 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0 to 1.4) for patients ≥75 years of age. There was a higher rate of major gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg than in patients receiving warfarin (1.6% vs. 1.1%, respectively, with a hazard ratio vs. warfarin of 1.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.9), and a higher rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds (5.7% vs. 3.9%, respectively). Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions Patients on PRADAXA 150 mg had an increased incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions (35% vs. 24% on warfarin). These were commonly dyspepsia (including abdominal pain upper, abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort, and epigastric discomfort) and gastritis-like symptoms (including GERD, esophagitis, erosive gastritis, gastric hemorrhage, hemorrhagic gastritis, hemorrhagic erosive gastritis, and gastrointestinal ulcer). Hypersensitivity Reactions In the RE-LY study, drug hypersensitivity (including urticaria, rash, and pruritus), allergic edema, anaphylactic reaction, and anaphylactic shock were reported in <0.1% of patients receiving PRADAXA. Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism PRADAXA was studied in 4387 patients in 4 pivotal, parallel, randomized, double-blind trials. Three of these trials were active-controlled (warfarin) (RE-COVER, RE-COVER II, and RE-MEDY), and one study (RE-SONATE) was placebo-controlled. The demographic characteristics were similar among the 4 pivotal studies and between the treatment groups within these studies. Approximately 60% of the treated patients were male, with a mean age of 55.1 years. The majority of the patients were white (87.7%), 10.3% were Asian, and 1.9% were black with a mean CrCl of 105.6 mL/min. Bleeding events for the 4 pivotal studies were classified as major bleeding events if at least one of the following criteria applied: fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical area or organ (intraocular, intracranial, intraspinal or intramuscular with compartment syndrome, retroperitoneal bleeding, intra-articular bleeding, or pericardial bleeding), bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin level of 2.0 g/dL (1.24 mmol/L or more, or leading to transfusion of 2 or more units of whole blood or red cells). RE-COVER and RE-COVER II studies compared PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily and warfarin for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Patients received 5-10 days of an approved parenteral anticoagulant therapy followed by 6 months, with mean exposure of 164 days, of oral only treatment; warfarin was overlapped with parenteral therapy. Table 3 shows the number of patients experiencing bleeding events in the pooled analysis of RE-COVER and RE-COVER II studies during the full treatment including parenteral and oral only treatment periods after randomization. Table 3 Bleeding Events in RE-COVER and RE-COVER II Treated Patients Note: MBE can belong to more than one criterion. aPatients with at least one MBE. bBleeding site based on investigator assessment. Patients can have more than one site of bleeding. cConfidence interval Bleeding Events-Full Treatment Period Including Parenteral Treatment PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily N (%) Warfarin N (%) Hazard Ratio (95% CI)c Patients N=2553 N=2554 Major bleeding eventa 37 (1.4) 51 (2.0) 0.73 (0.48, 1.11) Fatal bleeding 1 (0.04) 2 (0.1) Bleeding in a critical area or organ 7 (0.3) 15 (0.6) Fall in hemoglobin ≥2g/dL or transfusion ≥2 units of whole blood or packed red blood cells 32 (1.3) 38 (1.5) Bleeding sites for MBEb Intracranial 2 (0.1) 5 (0.2) Retroperitoneal 2 (0.1) 1 (0.04) Intraarticular 2 (0.1) 4 (0.2) Intramuscular 2 (0.1) 6 (0.2) Gastrointestinal 15 (0.6) 14 (0.5) Urogenital 7 (0.3) 14 (0.5) Other 8 (0.3) 8 (0.3) Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 101 (4.0) 170 (6.7) 0.58 (0.46, 0.75) Any bleeding 411 (16.1) 567 (22.7) 0.70 (0.61, 0.79) The rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg in the full treatment period was 3.1% (2.4% on warfarin). The RE-MEDY and RE-SONATE studies provided safety information on the use of PRADAXA for the reduction in the risk of recurrence of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. RE-MEDY was an active-controlled study (warfarin) in which 1430 patients received PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily following 3 to 12 months of oral anticoagulant regimen. Patients in the treatment studies who rolled over into the RE-MEDY study had a combined treatment duration of up to more than 3 years, with mean exposure of 473 days. Table 4 shows the number of patients experiencing bleeding events in the study. Table 4 Bleeding Events in RE-MEDY Treated Patients Note: MBE can belong to more than one criterion. aPatients with at least one MBE. bBleeding site based on investigator assessment. Patients can have more than one site of bleeding. cConfidence interval PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily N (%) Warfarin N (%) Hazard Ratio (95% CI)c Patients N=1430 N=1426 Major bleeding eventa 13 (0.9) 25 (1.8) 0.54 (0.25, 1.16) Fatal bleeding 0 1 (0.1) Bleeding in a critical area or organ 7 (0.5) 11 (0.8) Fall in hemoglobin ≥2g/dL or transfusion ≥2 units of whole blood or packed red blood cells 7 (0.5) 16 (1.1) Bleeding sites for MBEb Intracranial 2 (0.1) 4 (0.3) Intraocular 4 (0.3) 2 (0.1) Retroperitoneal 0 1 (0.1) Intraarticular 0 2 (0.1) Intramuscular 0 4 (0.3) Gastrointestinal 4 (0.3) 8 (0.6) Urogenital 1 (0.1) 1 (0.1) Other 2 (0.1) 4 (0.3) Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 71 (5.0) 125 (8.8) 0.56 (0.42, 0.75) Any bleeding 278 (19.4) 373 (26.2) 0.71 (0.61, 0.83) In the RE-MEDY study, the rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg was 3.1% (2.2% on warfarin). RE-SONATE was a placebo-controlled study in which 684 patients received PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily following 6 to 18 months of oral anticoagulant regimen. Patients in the treatment studies who rolled over into the RE-SONATE study had combined treatment duration up to 9 months, with mean exposure of 165 days. Table 5 shows the number of patients experiencing bleeding events in the study. Table 5 Bleeding Events in RE-SONATE Treated Patients Note: MBE can belong to more than one criterion. aPatients with at least one MBE. bBleeding site based on investigator assessment. Patients can have more than one site of bleeding. cConfidence interval PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily N (%) Placebo N (%) Hazard Ratio (95% CI)c Patients N=684 N=659 Major bleeding eventa 2 (0.3) 0 Bleeding in a critical area or organ 0 0 Gastrointestinalb 2 (0.3) 0 Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 34 (5.0) 13 (2.0) 2.54 (1.34, 4.82) Any bleeding 72 (10.5) 40 (6.1) 1.77 (1.20, 2.61) In the RE-SONATE study, the rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg was 0.7% (0.3% on placebo). Clinical Myocardial Infarction Events In the active-controlled VTE studies, a higher rate of clinical myocardial infarction was reported in patients who received PRADAXA [20 (0.66 per 100 patient-years)] than in those who received warfarin [5 (0.17 per 100 patient-years)]. In the placebo-controlled study, a similar rate of non-fatal and fatal clinical myocardial infarction was reported in patients who received PRADAXA [1 (0.32 per 100 patient-years)] and in those who received placebo [1 (0.34 per 100 patient-years)]. Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions In the four pivotal studies, patients on PRADAXA 150 mg had a similar incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions (24.7% vs. 22.7% on warfarin). Dyspepsia (including abdominal pain upper, abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort, and epigastric discomfort) occurred in patients on PRADAXA in 7.5% vs. 5.5% on warfarin, and gastritis-like symptoms (including gastritis, GERD, esophagitis, erosive gastritis and gastric hemorrhage) occurred at 3.0% vs. 1.7%, respectively. Hypersensitivity Reactions In the 4 pivotal studies, drug hypersensitivity (including urticaria, rash, and pruritus), allergic edema, anaphylactic reaction, and anaphylactic shock were reported in 0.1% of patients receiving PRADAXA. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of PRADAXA. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of PRADAXA: angioedema, thrombocytopenia, esophageal ulcer.
7 DRUG INTERACTIONS P-gp inducers rifampin: Avoid coadministration with PRADAXA (5.5) P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl 30-50 mL/min: Consider reducing dose or avoid (7) P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <30 mL/min: Not recommended (7) 7.1 Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation The concomitant use of PRADAXA with P-gp inducers (e.g., rifampin) reduces exposure to dabigatran and should generally be avoided [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. P-gp inhibition and impaired renal function are the major independent factors that result in increased exposure to dabigatran [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors in patients with renal impairment is expected to produce increased exposure of dabigatran compared to that seen with either factor alone. In patients with moderate renal impairment (CrCl 30-50 mL/min), consider reducing the dose of PRADAXA to 75 mg twice daily when administered concomitantly with the P-gp inhibitors dronedarone or systemic ketoconazole. The use of the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, amiodarone, quinidine, clarithromycin, and ticagrelor does not require a dose adjustment of PRADAXA. These results should not be extrapolated to other P-gp inhibitors [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Use in Specific Populations (8.6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. The concomitant use of PRADAXA and P-gp inhibitors in patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl 15-30 mL/min) should be avoided [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Use in Specific Populations (8.6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.2 Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Avoid use of PRADAXA and P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Use in Specific Populations (8.6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Geriatric use: Risk of bleeding increases with age (8.5) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Dabigatran has been shown to decrease the number of implantations when male and female rats were treated at a dosage of 70 mg/kg (about 2.6 to 3.0 times the human exposure at maximum recommended human dose [MRHD] of 300 mg/day based on area under the curve [AUC] comparisons) prior to mating and up to implantation (gestation Day 6). Treatment of pregnant rats after implantation with dabigatran at the same dose increased the number of dead offspring and caused excess vaginal/uterine bleeding close to parturition. Although dabigatran increased the incidence of delayed or irregular ossification of fetal skull bones and vertebrae in the rat, it did not induce major malformations in rats or rabbits. 8.2 Labor and Delivery Safety and effectiveness of PRADAXA during labor and delivery have not been studied in clinical trials. Consider the risks of bleeding and of stroke in using PRADAXA in this setting [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Death of offspring and mother rats during labor in association with uterine bleeding occurred during treatment of pregnant rats from implantation (gestation Day 7) to weaning (lactation Day 21) with dabigatran at a dose of 70 mg/kg (about 2.6 times the human exposure at MRHD of 300 mg/day based on AUC comparisons). 8.3 Nursing Mothers It is not known whether dabigatran is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from PRADAXA, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of PRADAXA in pediatric patients have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Of the total number of patients in the RE-LY study, 82% were 65 and over, while 40% were 75 and over. The risk of stroke and bleeding increases with age, but the risk-benefit profile is favorable in all age groups [see Warnings and Precautions (5), Adverse Reactions (6.1), and Clinical Studies (14.1)]. 8.6 Renal Impairment Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation No dose adjustment of PRADAXA is recommended in patients with mild or moderate renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Reduce the dose of PRADAXA in patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl 15-30 mL/min) [see Dosage and Administration (2.1, 2.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Dosing recommendations for patients with CrCl <15 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided. Adjust dose appropriately in patients with renal impairment receiving concomitant P-gp inhibitors [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.1), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl ≤30 mL/min) were excluded from RE-COVER. Dosing recommendations for patients with CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided. Avoid use of PRADAXA with concomitant P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.2), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Save on the cost of Pradaxa

With Our Pradaxa Discount Card

Be sure to ask your pharmacist not to substitute another card for ours as we are confident we offer the highest savings possible.

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Frequently Asked Questions

There are no catches to this. Simply print the card, take it to your pharmacy, and save. If you still have questions just read below...

How Do I Know My Pharmacy Will Accept It?
That's simple. The card is accepted at ALL CHAIN PHARMACIES such as CVS, Rite Aid, and Walgreens. If you don't know if your pharmacy accepts the card simply call them and give them the BIN and PCN numbers on the card. The card is accepted at most pharmacies. If you call a few one is sure to accept it.
Can I Use This In Conjunction With My Insurance?
No, unfortunately insurance companies don't allow "double-savings". However, if your insurance does not cover certain drugs (ex - cosmetic drugs, brand names, prenatal vitamins, etc) then this card may save you money. Also if your insurance requires you to pay a deductible on your brand name drugs before covering them, then this card may also provider greater savings!
How Much Will This Card Save Me?
You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
This Sounds Too Good To Be True. Is This A Scam?
Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
My Pharmacy Isn't Included. Can They Participate?
Yes! There are pharmacies who accept the pharmacy savings card that are not on our list. If you find one please email us and we'll update the list. If they are not a current partner and are interested, email us and we'll contact them to try and convince them to participate. You may also choose to call around and see if someone else in your area accepts it.
Is this the same as a Pradaxa copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
Savings of 70%!
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Savings of over $200!
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Savings of over 50%!
I had printed out 3 different discount cards on the internet and asked the pharmacist to check prices. The lowest price was $289. I searched the internet some more, I found this site, gave the pharmacy your card and the cost was $130. What a big savings, I can't thank this site enough. - Linda S.

Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

Accepted At Over 59,000 Pharmacies Nationwide!

Including...
  • Including...
  • Cub Pharmacy
  • Kmart
  • HEB
  • Target
  • Winn Dixie
  • Costco
  • Safeway
  • Kroger
  • Tom Thumb
  • CVS
  • Brookshire`s
  • Rite Aid
  • Fred`s Pharmacy
  • Walmart
  • Long Drugs
  • Walgreens
  • Giant
  • Save Mart Pharmacy
  • Fred Meyer
  • We Care Pharmacy
  • Albertsons

And thousands of independent pharmacies nationwide!

Dabigatran (Pradaxa in Australia, Europe and USA, Pradax in Canada, Prazaxa in Japan) is an oral anticoagulant from the class of the direct thrombin inhibitors. It is being studied for various clinical indications and in some cases it offers an alternative to warfarin as the preferred orally administered anticoagulant ("blood thinner") since it does not require frequent blood tests for international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring while offering similar results in terms of efficacy. There is no specific way to reverse the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in the event of a major bleeding event, unlike warfarin. It was developed by the pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim.

Wikipedia contributors. "Pradaxa" Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Jul 3, 2012. Web. Jul 6, 2012.

Pradaxa Coupon

Currently we do not have any available, however you can receive an instant discount at your pharmacy with our Pradaxa discount card. Create one instantly

Important Note

The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

This Pradaxa discount should not be confused with a Pradaxa coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

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"I have been using the RX card for almost a year now. In that time, it has saved my family over $4000. We have no insurance, and the RX card has been a God send. My husband and I are both disabled, and my 65-year old mother is almost blind and diabetic, so we would have simply had to do without. The RX card enabled us to have the meds we need. Thank you so very much!" - Sharon H.
Save up to 75% on your medication
Save up to 75% on your medication