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Seroquel is a medication used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other psychological conditions. It works by changing how chemicals in the brain are used. Seroquel reviews show that it can be used in conjunction with other anti-depressants to treat adult major depressive disorder. Prescriptions used to treat psychological disorders can be quite costly, but a Seroquel discount card is available through AffordRx to make your prescription more affordable.

Side Effects of Seroquel

According to Seroquel reviews, the side effects of Seroquel are numerous. As with any other medication, if you notice swelling, difficulty breathing, or hives on your body, seek medical attention immediately as you may be having an allergic reaction. The possible side effects of Seroquel include:
  • Dry mouth
  • Dizziness
  • Weight gain and increased appetite
  • Speech difficulties
  • Tremors
  • Feeling faint
  • Stiff muscles
  • Blurred vision
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Increased thirst and urination
  • Nausea and vomiting
Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any of these side effects.

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According to Seroquel reviews, the use of a Seroquel discount card can help you save money on your prescription and perhaps even more than insurance coverage can save you. To get your own Seroquel discount card, click the "Print Card Now" button, and start saving instantly! You can also request a card to be sent to you by mail.

"Seroquel." Information from Drugs.com. Cerner Multum, Inc., 15 Aug. 2011. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
"Quetiapine." Information from Wikipedia.org. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 15 Feb. 2013. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
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  • ABC
  • NBC
  • FOX
  • CBS
  • San Francisco Chronicle
  • About.com
  • CIO
  • Boston.com
Estimated Savings Of Over $9,825,310

Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Seroquel discount card helps you save money on the exact same Seroquel prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Seroquel prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

Seroquel is a medication used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other psychological conditions. It works by changing how chemicals in the brain are used. Seroquel reviews show that it can be used in conjunction with other anti-depressants to treat adult major depressive disorder. Prescriptions used to treat psychological disorders can be quite costly, but a Seroquel discount card is available through AffordRx to make your prescription more affordable.

Side Effects of Seroquel

According to Seroquel reviews, the side effects of Seroquel are numerous. As with any other medication, if you notice swelling, difficulty breathing, or hives on your body, seek medical attention immediately as you may be having an allergic reaction. The possible side effects of Seroquel include:
  • Dry mouth
  • Dizziness
  • Weight gain and increased appetite
  • Speech difficulties
  • Tremors
  • Feeling faint
  • Stiff muscles
  • Blurred vision
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Increased thirst and urination
  • Nausea and vomiting
Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any of these side effects.

Save Money with a Seroquel Discount Card

According to Seroquel reviews, the use of a Seroquel discount card can help you save money on your prescription and perhaps even more than insurance coverage can save you. To get your own Seroquel discount card, click the "Print Card Now" button, and start saving instantly! You can also request a card to be sent to you by mail.

"Seroquel." Information from Drugs.com. Cerner Multum, Inc., 15 Aug. 2011. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
"Quetiapine." Information from Wikipedia.org. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 15 Feb. 2013. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
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SEROQUEL prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Seroquel safely and effectively.
Before taking Seroquel please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Seroquel.
WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS; and SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. SEROQUEL is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults in short-term studies. These studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior with antidepressant use in patients over age 24; there was a reduction in risk with antidepressant use in patients aged 65 and older [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. In patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy, monitor closely for worsening, and for emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Advise families and caregivers of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ]. SEROQUEL is not approved for use in pediatric patients under ten years of age [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)]. WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS; and SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis •Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. SEROQUEL is not approved for elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis (5.1) Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors •Increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in children, adolescents and young adults taking antidepressants (5.2) •Monitor for worsening and emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors (5.2)
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE SEROQUEL is an atypical antipsychotic indicated for the treatment of: •Schizophrenia (1.1) •Bipolar I disorder manic episodes (1.2) •Bipolar disorder, depressive episodes (1.2) 1.1 Schizophrenia SEROQUEL is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia. The efficacy of SEROQUEL in schizophrenia was established in three 6-week trials in adults and one 6-week trial in adolescents (13-17 years). The effectiveness of SEROQUEL for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia has not been systematically evaluated in controlled clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. 1.2 Bipolar Disorder SEROQUEL is indicated for the acute treatment of manic episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, both as monotherapy and as an adjunct to lithium or divalproex. Efficacy was established in two 12-week monotherapy trials in adults, in one 3-week adjunctive trial in adults, and in one 3-week monotherapy trial in pediatric patients (10-17 years) [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. SEROQUEL is indicated as monotherapy for the acute treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar disorder. Efficacy was established in two 8-week monotherapy trials in adult patients with bipolar I and bipolar II disorder [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. SEROQUEL is indicated for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder, as an adjunct to lithium or divalproex. Efficacy was established in two maintenance trials in adults. The effectiveness of SEROQUEL as monotherapy for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder has not been systematically evaluated in controlled clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. 1.3 Special Considerations in Treating Pediatric Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder Pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are serious mental disorders, however, diagnosis can be challenging. For pediatric schizophrenia, symptom profiles can be variable, and for bipolar I disorder, patients may have variable patterns of periodicity of manic or mixed symptoms. It is recommended that medication therapy for pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder be initiated only after a thorough diagnostic evaluation has been performed and careful consideration given to the risks associated with medication treatment. Medication treatment for both pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder is indicated as part of a total treatment program that often includes psychological, educational and social interventions.
Recommended DoseMaximum Dose150-750 mg/day750 mg/day400-800 mg/day800 mg/day400-800 mg/day 800 mg/day400-600 mg/day600 mg/day300 mg/day300 mg/day
Indication Initial Dose
Schizophrenia-Adults (2.2) 25 mg twice daily
Schizophrenia- Adolescents (13-17 years) (2.2) 25 mg twice daily
Bipolar Mania- Adults Monotherapy or as an adjunct to lithium or divalproex (2.2) 50 mg twice daily
Bipolar Mania- Children and Adolescents (10 to 17 years), Monotherapy (2.2) 25 mg twice daily
Bipolar Depression- Adults (2.2) 50 mg once daily at bedtime
3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS •25 mg tablets are peach, round, biconvex, film coated tablets, identified with 'SEROQUEL' and ‘25’ on one side and plain on the other side, •50 mg tablets are white, round, biconvex, film coated tablets, identified with 'SEROQUEL' and ‘50’ on one side and plain on the other side •100 mg tablets are yellow, round, biconvex film coated tablets, identified with 'SEROQUEL' and ‘100’ on one side and plain on the other side •200 mg tablets are white, round, biconvex, film coated tablets, identified with ‘SEROQUEL’ and ‘200’ on one side and plain on the other side •300 mg tablets are white, capsule-shaped, biconvex, film coated tablets, intagliated with ‘SEROQUEL’ on one side and ‘300’ on the other side •400 mg tablets are yellow, capsule-shaped, biconvex, film coated tablets, intagliated with ‘SEROQUEL’ on one side and ‘400’ on the other side Tablets: 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg, and 400 mg (3)
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Hypersensitivity to quetiapine or to any excipients in the SEROQUEL formulation. Anaphylactic reactions have been reported in patients treated with SEROQUEL. Known hypersensitivity to SEROQUEL or any components in the formulation. (4)
5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS • Cerebrovascular Adverse Reactions: Increased incidence of cerebrovascular adverse events (e.g., stroke, transient ischemic attack) has been seen in elderly patients with dementia-related psychoses treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs (5.3) • Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS): Manage with immediate discontinuation and close monitoring (5.4) • Metabolic Changes: Atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes. These metabolic changes include hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and weight gain (5.5) Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus: Monitor patients for symptoms of hyperglycemia including polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia, and weakness. Monitor glucose regularly in patients with diabetes or at risk for diabetes Dyslipidemia: Undesirable alterations have been observed in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. Appropriate clinical monitoring is recommended, including fasting blood lipid testing at the beginning of, and periodically, during treatment Weight Gain: Gain in body weight has been observed; clinical monitoring of weight is recommended • Tardive Dyskinesia: Discontinue if clinically appropriate (5.6) • Hypotension: Use with caution in patients with known cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease (5.7) • Increased Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents: Monitor blood pressure at the beginning of, and periodically during treatment in children and adolescents (5.8) • Leukopenia, Neutropenia and Agranulocytosis: Monitor complete blood count frequently during the first few months of treatment in patients with a pre-existing low white cell count or a history of leukopenia/neutropenia and discontinue SEROQUEL at the first sign of a decline in WBC in absence of other causative factors (5.9) • Cataracts: Lens changes have been observed in patients during long-term quetiapine treatment. Lens examination is recommended when starting treatment and at 6-month intervals during chronic treatment (5.10) 5.1 Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Analysis of 17 placebo-controlled trials (modal duration of 10 weeks), largely in patients taking atypical antipsychotic drugs, revealed a risk of death in drug-treated patients of between 1.6 to 1.7 times the risk of death in placebo-treated patients. Over the course of a typical 10-week controlled trial, the rate of death in drug-treated patients was about 4.5%, compared to a rate of about 2.6% in the placebo group. Although the causes of death were varied, most of the deaths appeared to be either cardiovascular (e.g., heart failure, sudden death) or infectious (e.g., pneumonia) in nature. Observational studies suggest that, similar to atypical antipsychotic drugs, treatment with conventional antipsychotic drugs may increase mortality. The extent to which the findings of increased mortality in observational studies may be attributed to the antipsychotic drug as opposed to some characteristic(s) of the patients is not clear. SEROQUEL is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Boxed Warning]. 5.2 Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Adolescents and Young Adults Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), both adult and pediatric, may experience worsening of their depression and/or the emergence of suicidal ideation and behavior (suicidality) or unusual changes in behavior, whether or not they are taking antidepressant medications, and this risk may persist until significant remission occurs. Suicide is a known risk of depression and certain other psychiatric disorders, and these disorders themselves are the strongest predictors of suicide. There has been a long-standing concern, however, that antidepressants may have a role in inducing worsening of depression and the emergence of suicidality in certain patients during the early phases of treatment. Pooled analyses of short-term placebo-controlled trials of antidepressant drugs (SSRIs and others) showed that these drugs increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 18-24) with major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults aged 65 and older. The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescents with MDD, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 24 short-term trials of 9 antidepressant drugs in over 4400 patients. The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in adults with MDD or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 295 short-term trials (median duration of 2 months) of 11 antidepressant drugs in over 77,000 patients. There was considerable variation in risk of suicidality among drugs, but a tendency toward an increase in the younger patients for almost all drugs studied. There were differences in absolute risk of suicidality across the different indications, with the highest incidence in MDD. The risk differences (drug vs. placebo), however, were relatively stable within age strata and across indications. These risk differences (drug-placebo difference in the number of cases of suicidality per 1000 patients treated) are provided in Table 2. Table 2: Drug-Placebo Difference in Number of Cases of Suicidality per 1000 Patients Treated Age Range Drug-Placebo Difference in Number of Cases of Suicidality per 1000 Patients Treated Increases Compared to Placebo <18 14 additional cases 18-24 5 additional cases Decreases Compared to Placebo 25-64 1 fewer case ≥65 6 fewer cases No suicides occurred in any of the pediatric trials. There were suicides in the adult trials, but the number was not sufficient to reach any conclusion about drug effect on suicide. It is unknown whether the suicidality risk extends to longer-term use, i.e., beyond several months. However, there is substantial evidence from placebo-controlled maintenance trials in adults with depression that the use of antidepressants can delay the recurrence of depression. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of a course of drug therapy, or at times of dose changes, either increases or decreases. The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder as well as for other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric. Although a causal link between the emergence of such symptoms and either the worsening of depression and/or the emergence of suicidal impulses has not been established, there is concern that such symptoms may represent precursors to emerging suicidality. Consideration should be given to changing the therapeutic regimen, including possibly discontinuing the medication, in patients whose depression is persistently worse, or who are experiencing emergent suicidality or symptoms that might be precursors to worsening depression or suicidality, especially if these symptoms are severe, abrupt in onset, or were not part of the patient's presenting symptoms. Families and caregivers of patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder or other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric, should be alerted about the need to monitor patients for the emergence of agitation, irritability, unusual changes in behavior, and the other symptoms described above, as well as the emergence of suicidality, and to report such symptoms immediately to healthcare providers. Such monitoring should include daily observation by families and caregivers. Prescriptions for SEROQUEL should be written for the smallest quantity of tablets consistent with good patient management, in order to reduce the risk of overdose. Screening Patients for Bipolar Disorder: A major depressive episode may be the initial presentation of bipolar disorder. It is generally believed (though not established in controlled trials) that treating such an episode with an antidepressant alone may increase the likelihood of precipitation of a mixed/manic episode in patients at risk for bipolar disorder. Whether any of the symptoms described above represent such a conversion is unknown. However, prior to initiating treatment with an antidepressant, including SEROQUEL, patients with depressive symptoms should be adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression. 5.3 Cerebrovascular Adverse Reactions, Including Stroke, in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis In placebo-controlled trials with risperidone, aripiprazole, and olanzapine in elderly subjects with dementia, there was a higher incidence of cerebrovascular adverse reactions (cerebrovascular accidents and transient ischemic attacks) including fatalities compared to placebo-treated subjects. SEROQUEL is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see also Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ]. 5.4 Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) has been reported in association with administration of antipsychotic drugs, including SEROQUEL. Rare cases of NMS have been reported with SEROQUEL. Clinical manifestations of NMS are hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, altered mental status, and evidence of autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis, and cardiac dysrhythmia). Additional signs may include elevated creatine phosphokinase, myoglobinuria (rhabdomyolysis) and acute renal failure. The diagnostic evaluation of patients with this syndrome is complicated. In arriving at a diagnosis, it is important to exclude cases where the clinical presentation includes both serious medical illness (e.g., pneumonia, systemic infection, etc.) and untreated or inadequately treated extrapyramidal signs and symptoms (EPS). Other important considerations in the differential diagnosis include central anticholinergic toxicity, heat stroke, drug fever and primary central nervous system (CNS) pathology. The management of NMS should include: 1) immediate discontinuation of antipsychotic drugs and other drugs not essential to concurrent therapy; 2) intensive symptomatic treatment and medical monitoring; and 3) treatment of any concomitant serious medical problems for which specific treatments are available. There is no general agreement about specific pharmacological treatment regimens for NMS. If a patient requires antipsychotic drug treatment after recovery from NMS, the potential reintroduction of drug therapy should be carefully considered. The patient should be carefully monitored since recurrences of NMS have been reported. 5.5 Metabolic Changes Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been associated with metabolic changes that include hyperglycemia/diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and body weight gain. While all of the drugs in the class have been shown to produce some metabolic changes, each drug has its own specific risk profile. In some patients, a worsening of more than one of the metabolic parameters of weight, blood glucose, and lipids was observed in clinical studies. Changes in these metabolic profiles should be managed as clinically appropriate. Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus Hyperglycemia, in some cases extreme and associated with ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar coma or death, has been reported in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics, including quetiapine. Assessment of the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and glucose abnormalities is complicated by the possibility of an increased background risk of diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia and the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the general population. Given these confounders, the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and hyperglycemia-related adverse reactions is not completely understood. However, epidemiological studies suggest an increased risk of treatment-emergent hyperglycemia-related adverse reactions in patients treated with the atypical antipsychotics. Precise risk estimates for hyperglycemia-related adverse reactions in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics are not available. Patients with an established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who are started on atypical antipsychotics should be monitored regularly for worsening of glucose control. Patients with risk factors for diabetes mellitus (e.g., obesity, family history of diabetes) who are starting treatment with atypical antipsychotics should undergo fasting blood glucose testing at the beginning of treatment and periodically during treatment. Any patient treated with atypical antipsychotics should be monitored for symptoms of hyperglycemia including polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia, and weakness. Patients who develop symptoms of hyperglycemia during treatment with atypical antipsychotics should undergo fasting blood glucose testing. In some cases, hyperglycemia has resolved when the atypical antipsychotic was discontinued; however, some patients required continuation of anti-diabetic treatment despite discontinuation of the suspect drug. Adults: Table 3: Fasting Glucose - Proportion of Patients Shifting to ≥126 mg/dL in Short-Term (≤12 weeks) Placebo-Controlled StudiesIncludes SEROQUEL and SEROQUEL XR data. Laboratory Analyte Category Change (At Least Once) from Baseline Treatment Arm N Patients n (%) Fasting Glucose Normal to High (<100 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL) Quetiapine 2907 71 (2.4%) Placebo 1346 19 (1.4%) Borderline to High (≥ 100 mg/dL and <126 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL) Quetiapine 572 67 (11.7%) Placebo 279 33 (11.8%) In a 24-week trial (active-controlled, 115 patients treated with SEROQUEL) designed to evaluate glycemic status with oral glucose tolerance testing of all patients, at week 24 the incidence of a treatment-emergent post-glucose challenge glucose level ≥ 200 mg/dL was 1.7% and the incidence of a fasting treatment-emergent blood glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL was 2.6%. The mean change in fasting glucose from baseline was 3.2 mg/dL and mean change in 2 hour glucose from baseline was -1.8 mg/dL for quetiapine. In 2 long-term placebo-controlled randomized withdrawal clinical trials for bipolar I disorder maintenance, mean exposure of 213 days for SEROQUEL (646 patients) and 152 days for placebo (680 patients), the mean change in glucose from baseline was +5.0 mg/dL for SEROQUEL and –0.05 mg/dL for placebo. The exposure-adjusted rate of any increased blood glucose level (≥ 126 mg/dL) for patients more than 8 hours since a meal (however, some patients may not have been precluded from calorie intake from fluids during fasting period) was 18.0 per 100 patient years for SEROQUEL (10.7% of patients; n=556) and 9.5 for placebo per 100 patient years (4.6% of patients; n=581). Children and Adolescents: In a placebo-controlled SEROQUEL monotherapy study of adolescent patients (13–17 years of age) with schizophrenia (6 weeks duration), the mean change in fasting glucose levels for SEROQUEL (n=138) compared to placebo (n=67) was –0.75 mg/dL versus –1.70 mg/dL. In a placebo-controlled SEROQUEL monotherapy study of children and adolescent patients (10–17 years of age) with bipolar mania (3 weeks duration), the mean change in fasting glucose level for SEROQUEL (n=170) compared to placebo (n=81) was 3.62 mg/dL versus –1.17 mg/dL. No patient in either study with a baseline normal fasting glucose level (<100 mg/dL) or a baseline borderline fasting glucose level (≥100 mg/dL and <126 mg/dL) had a treatment-emergent blood glucose level of ≥126 mg/dL. In a placebo-controlled SEROQUEL XR monotherapy study (8 weeks duration) of children and adolescent patients (10 – 17 years of age) with bipolar depression, in which efficacy was not established, the mean change in fasting glucose levels for SEROQUEL XR (n = 60) compared to placebo (n = 62) was 1.8 mg/dL versus 1.6 mg/dL. In this study, there were no patients in the SEROQUEL XR or placebo-treated groups with a baseline normal fasting glucose level (< 100 mg/dL) that had an increase in blood glucose level > 126 mg/dL. There was one patient in the SEROQUEL XR group with a baseline borderline fasting glucose level (> 100 mg/dL) and (< 126 mg/dL) who had an increase in blood glucose level of > 126 mg/dL compared to zero patients in the placebo group. Dyslipidemia Adults: Table 4 shows the percentage of adult patients with changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol from baseline by indication in clinical trials with SEROQUEL. Table 4: Percentage of Adult Patients with Shifts in Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDL-Cholesterol and HDL-Cholesterol from Baseline to Clinically Significant Levels by Indication Laboratory Analyte Indication Treatment Arm N Patients n (%) Total Cholesterol ≥240 mg/dL Schizophrenia6 weeks duration SEROQUEL 137 24 (18%) Placebo 92 6 (7%) Bipolar Depression8 weeks duration SEROQUEL 463 41 (9%) Placebo 250 15 (6%) Triglycerides ≥200 mg/dL Schizophrenia SEROQUEL 120 26 (22%) Placebo 70 11 (16%) Bipolar Depression SEROQUEL 436 59 (14%) Placebo 232 20 (9%) LDL- Cholesterol ≥ 160 mg/dL Schizophrenia SEROQUEL naParameters not measured in the SEROQUEL registration studies for schizophrenia. Lipid parameters also were not measured in the bipolar mania registration studies. na Placebo na na Bipolar Depression SEROQUEL 465 29 (6%) Placebo 256 12 (5%) HDL- Cholesterol ≤ 40 mg/dL Schizophrenia SEROQUEL na na Placebo na na Bipolar Depression SEROQUEL 393 56 (14%) Placebo 214 29 (14%) Children and Adolescents: Table 5 shows the percentage of children and adolescents with changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol from baseline in clinical trials with SEROQUEL. Table 5: Percentage of Children and Adolescents with Shifts in Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDL-Cholesterol and HDL-Cholesterol from Baseline to Clinically Significant Levels Laboratory Analyte Indication Treatment Arm N Patients n (%) Total Cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL Schizophrenia13-17 years, 6 weeks duration SEROQUEL 107 13 (12%) Placebo 56 1 (2%) Bipolar Mania10-17 years, 3 weeks duration SEROQUEL 159 16 (10%) Placebo 66 2 (3%) Triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL Schizophrenia SEROQUEL 103 17 (17%) Placebo 51 4 (8%) Bipolar Mania SEROQUEL 149 32 (22%) Placebo 60 8 (13%) LDL-Cholesterol ≥ 130 mg/dL Schizophrenia SEROQUEL 112 4 (4%) Placebo 60 1 (2%) Bipolar Mania SEROQUEL 169 13 (8%) Placebo 74 4 (5%) HDL-Cholesterol ≤ 40 mg/dL Schizophrenia SEROQUEL 104 16 (15%) Placebo 54 10 (19%) Bipolar Mania SEROQUEL 154 16 (10%) Placebo 61 4 (7%) In a placebo-controlled SEROQUEL XR monotherapy study (8 weeks duration) of children and adolescent patients (10-17 years of age) with bipolar depression, in which efficacy was not established, the percentage of children and adolescents with shifts in total cholesterol (≥200 mg/dL), triglycerides (≥150 mg/dL), LDL-cholesterol (≥ 130 mg/dL) and HDL-cholesterol (≤40 mg/dL) from baseline to clinically significant levels were: total cholesterol 8% (7/83) for SEROQUEL XR vs. 6% (5/84) for placebo; triglycerides 28% (22/80) for SEROQUEL XR vs. 9% (7/82) for placebo; LDL-cholesterol 2% (2/86) for SEROQUEL XR vs. 4% (3/85) for placebo and HDL-cholesterol 20% (13/65) for SEROQUEL XR vs. 15% (11/74) for placebo. Weight Gain Increases in weight have been observed in clinical trials. Patients receiving quetiapine should receive regular monitoring of weight. Adults: In clinical trials with SEROQUEL the following increases in weight have been reported. Table 6: Proportion of Patients with Weight Gain ≥7% of Body Weight (Adults) Vital Sign Indication Treatment Arm N Patients n (%) Weight Gain ≥7% of Body Weight Schizophreniaup to 6 weeks duration SEROQUEL 391 89 (23%) Placebo 206 11 (6%) Bipolar Mania (monotherapy)up to 12 weeks duration SEROQUEL 209 44 (21%) Placebo 198 13 (7%) Bipolar Mania (adjunct therapy)up to 3 weeks duration SEROQUEL 196 25 (13%) Placebo 203 8 (4%) Bipolar Depressionup to 8 weeks duration SEROQUEL 554 47 (8%) Placebo 295 7 (2%) Children and Adolescents: In two clinical trials with SEROQUEL, one in bipolar mania and one in schizophrenia, reported increases in weight are included in table 7. Table 7: Proportion of Patients with Weight Gain ≥7% of Body Weight (Children and Adolescents) Vital Sign Indication Treatment Arm N Patients n (%) Weight Gain ≥7% of Body Weight Schizophrenia6 weeks duration SEROQUEL 111 23 (21%) Placebo 44 3 (7%) Bipolar Mania3 weeks duration SEROQUEL 157 18 (12%) Placebo 68 0 (0%) The mean change in body weight in the schizophrenia trial was 2.0 kg in the SEROQUEL group and -0.4 kg in the placebo group and in the bipolar mania trial it was 1.7 kg in the SEROQUEL group and 0.4 kg in the placebo group. In an open-label study that enrolled patients from the above two pediatric trials, 63% of patients (241/380) completed 26 weeks of therapy with SEROQUEL. After 26 weeks of treatment, the mean increase in body weight was 4.4 kg. Forty-five percent of the patients gained ≥ 7% of their body weight, not adjusted for normal growth. In order to adjust for normal growth over 26 weeks an increase of at least 0.5 standard deviation from baseline in BMI was used as a measure of a clinically significant change; 18.3% of patients on SEROQUEL met this criterion after 26 weeks of treatment. In a clinical trial for SEROQUEL XR in children and adolescents (10-17 years of age) with bipolar depression, in which efficacy was not established, the percentage of patients with weight gain ≥7% of body weight at any time was 15% (14/92) for SEROQUEL XR vs. 10% (10/100) for placebo. The mean change in body weight was 1.4 kg in the SEROQUEL XR group vs. 0.6 kg in the placebo group. When treating pediatric patients with SEROQUEL for any indication, weight gain should be assessed against that expected for normal growth. 5.6 Tardive Dyskinesia A syndrome of potentially irreversible, involuntary, dyskinetic movements may develop in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs, including quetiapine. Although the prevalence of the syndrome appears to be highest among the elderly, especially elderly women, it is impossible to rely upon prevalence estimates to predict, at the inception of antipsychotic treatment, which patients are likely to develop the syndrome. Whether antipsychotic drug products differ in their potential to cause tardive dyskinesia is unknown. The risk of developing tardive dyskinesia and the likelihood that it will become irreversible are believed to increase as the duration of treatment and the total cumulative dose of antipsychotic drugs administered to the patient increase. However, the syndrome can develop, although much less commonly, after relatively brief treatment periods at low doses or may even arise after discontinuation of treatment. There is no known treatment for established cases of tardive dyskinesia, although the syndrome may remit, partially or completely, if antipsychotic treatment is withdrawn. Antipsychotic treatment, itself, however, may suppress (or partially suppress) the signs and symptoms of the syndrome and thereby may possibly mask the underlying process. The effect that symptomatic suppression has upon the long-term course of the syndrome is unknown. Given these considerations, SEROQUEL should be prescribed in a manner that is most likely to minimize the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia. Chronic antipsychotic treatment should generally be reserved for patients who appear to suffer from a chronic illness that (1) is known to respond to antipsychotic drugs, and (2) for whom alternative, equally effective, but potentially less harmful treatments are not available or appropriate. In patients who do require chronic treatment, the smallest dose and the shortest duration of treatment producing a satisfactory clinical response should be sought. The need for continued treatment should be reassessed periodically. If signs and symptoms of tardive dyskinesia appear in a patient on SEROQUEL, drug discontinuation should be considered. However, some patients may require treatment with SEROQUEL despite the presence of the syndrome. 5.7 Hypotension Quetiapine may induce orthostatic hypotension associated with dizziness, tachycardia and, in some patients, syncope, especially during the initial dose-titration period, probably reflecting its α1-adrenergic antagonist properties. Syncope was reported in 1% (28/3265) of the patients treated with SEROQUEL, compared with 0.2% (2/954) on placebo and about 0.4% (2/527) on active control drugs. Orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, and syncope may lead to falls. SEROQUEL should be used with particular caution in patients with known cardiovascular disease (history of myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease, heart failure or conduction abnormalities), cerebrovascular disease or conditions which would predispose patients to hypotension (dehydration, hypovolemia and treatment with antihypertensive medications). The risk of orthostatic hypotension and syncope may be minimized by limiting the initial dose to 25 mg twice daily [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)]. If hypotension occurs during titration to the target dose, a return to the previous dose in the titration schedule is appropriate. 5.8 Increases in Blood Pressure (Children and Adolescents) In placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescents with schizophrenia (6-week duration) or bipolar mania (3-week duration), the incidence of increases at any time in systolic blood pressure (≥20 mmHg) was 15.2% (51/335) for SEROQUEL and 5.5% (9/163) for placebo; the incidence of increases at any time in diastolic blood pressure (≥10 mmHg) was 40.6% (136/335) for SEROQUEL and 24.5% (40/163) for placebo. In the 26-week open-label clinical trial, one child with a reported history of hypertension experienced a hypertensive crisis. Blood pressure in children and adolescents should be measured at the beginning of, and periodically during treatment. In a placebo-controlled SEROQUEL XR clinical trial (8 weeks duration) in children and adolescents (10-17 years of age) with bipolar depression, in which efficacy was not established, the incidence of increases at any time in systolic blood pressure (≥20 mmHg) was 6.5% (6/92) for SEROQUEL XR and 6.0% (6/100) for placebo; the incidence of increases at any time in diastolic blood pressure (≥10 mmHg) was 46.7% (43/92) for SEROQUEL XR and 36.0% (36/100) for placebo. 5.9 Leukopenia, Neutropenia and Agranulocytosis In clinical trial and postmarketing experience, events of leukopenia/neutropenia have been reported temporally related to atypical antipsychotic agents, including SEROQUEL. Agranulocytosis (including fatal cases) has also been reported. Possible risk factors for leukopenia/neutropenia include pre-existing low white cell count (WBC) and history of drug induced leukopenia/neutropenia. Patients with a pre-existing low WBC or a history of drug induced leukopenia/neutropenia should have their complete blood count (CBC) monitored frequently during the first few months of therapy and should discontinue SEROQUEL at the first sign of a decline in WBC in absence of other causative factors. Patients with neutropenia should be carefully monitored for fever or other symptoms or signs of infection and treated promptly if such symptoms or signs occur. Patients with severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1000/mm3) should discontinue SEROQUEL and have their WBC followed until recovery. 5.10 Cataracts The development of cataracts was observed in association with quetiapine treatment in chronic dog studies [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.2)]. Lens changes have also been observed in adults, children and adolescents during long-term SEROQUEL treatment, but a causal relationship to SEROQUEL use has not been established. Nevertheless, the possibility of lenticular changes cannot be excluded at this time. Therefore, examination of the lens by methods adequate to detect cataract formation, such as slit lamp exam or other appropriately sensitive methods, is recommended at initiation of treatment or shortly thereafter, and at 6-month intervals during chronic treatment. 5.11 QT Prolongation In clinical trials quetiapine was not associated with a persistent increase in QT intervals. However, the QT effect was not systematically evaluated in a thorough QT study. In post marketing experience, there were cases reported of QT prolongation in patients who overdosed on quetiapine [see Overdosage (10.1)], in patients with concomitant illness, and in patients taking medicines known to cause electrolyte imbalance or increase QT interval. The use of quetiapine should be avoided in combination with other drugs that are known to prolong QTc including Class 1A antiarrythmics (e.g., quinidine, procainamide) or Class III antiarrythmics (e.g., amiodarone, sotalol), antipsychotic medications (e.g., ziprasidone, chlorpromazine, thioridazine), antibiotics (e.g., gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin), or any other class of medications known to prolong the QTc interval (e.g., pentamidine, levomethadyl acetate, methadone). Quetiapine should also be avoided in circumstances that may increase the risk of occurrence of torsade de pointes and/or sudden death including (1) a history of cardiac arrhythmias such as bradycardia; (2) hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia; (3) concomitant use of other drugs that prolong the QTc interval; and (4) presence of congenital prolongation of the QT interval. Caution should also be exercised when quetiapine is prescribed in patients with increased risk of QT prolongation (e.g., cardiovascular disease, family history of QT prolongation, the elderly, congestive heart failure and heart hypertrophy). 5.12 Seizures During clinical trials, seizures occurred in 0.5% (20/3490) of patients treated with SEROQUEL compared to 0.2% (2/954) on placebo and 0.7% (4/527) on active control drugs. As with other antipsychotics, SEROQUEL should be used cautiously in patients with a history of seizures or with conditions that potentially lower the seizure threshold, e.g., Alzheimer’s dementia. Conditions that lower the seizure threshold may be more prevalent in a population of 65 years or older. 5.13 Hypothyroidism Adults: Clinical trials with quetiapine demonstrated dose-related decreases in thyroid hormone levels. The reduction in total and free thyroxine (T4) of approximately 20% at the higher end of the therapeutic dose range was maximal in the first six weeks of treatment and maintained without adaptation or progression during more chronic therapy. In nearly all cases, cessation of quetiapine treatment was associated with a reversal of the effects on total and free T4, irrespective of the duration of treatment. The mechanism by which quetiapine effects the thyroid axis is unclear. If there is an effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, measurement of TSH alone may not accurately reflect a patient’s thyroid status. Therefore, both TSH and free T4, in addition to clinical assessment, should be measured at baseline and at follow-up. In the mania adjunct studies, where SEROQUEL was added to lithium or divalproex, 12% (24/196) of SEROQUEL treated patients compared to 7% (15/203) of placebo-treated patients had elevated TSH levels. Of the SEROQUEL treated patients with elevated TSH levels, 3 had simultaneous low free T4 levels (free T4 <0.8 LLN). About 0.7% (26/3489) of SEROQUEL patients did experience TSH increases in monotherapy studies. Some patients with TSH increases needed replacement thyroid treatment. In all quetiapine trials, the incidence of significant shifts in thyroid hormones and TSH were Based on shifts from normal baseline to potentially clinically important value at anytime post-baseline. Shifts in total T4, free T4, total T3 and free T3 are defined as <0.8 x LLN (pmol/L) and shift in TSH is > 5 mlU/L at any time.: decrease in free T4 (free T4 <0.8 LLN), 2.0% (357/17513); decrease in total T4, 4.0% (75/1861); decrease in free T3, 0.4% (53/13766); decrease in total T3, 2.0% (26/1312), and increase in TSH, 4.9% (956/19412). In eight patients, where TBG was measured, levels of TBG were unchanged. Table 8 shows the incidence of these shifts in short term placebo-controlled clinical trials. Table 8: Incidence of shifts in thyroid hormone levels and TSH in short-term placebo-controlled clinical trialsBased on shifts from normal baseline to potentially clinically important value at anytime post-baseline. Shifts in total T4, free T4, total T3 and free T3 are defined as <0.8 x LLN (pmol/L) and shift in TSH is >5 mlU/L at any time., Includes SEROQUEL and SEROQUEL XR data. Total T4 Free T4 Total T3 Free T3 TSH Quetiapine Placebo Quetiapine Placebo Quetiapine Placebo Quetiapine Placebo Quetiapine Placebo 3.4 % (37/1097) 0.6% (4/651) 0.7% (52/7218) 0.1% (4/3668) 0.5% (2/369) 0.0% (0/113) 0.2% (11/5673) 0.0% (1/2679) 3.2% (240/7587) 2.7% (105/3912) In short-term placebo-controlled monotherapy trials, the incidence of reciprocal, shifts in T3 and TSH was 0.0 % for both quetiapine (1/4800) and placebo (0/2190) and for T4 and TSH the shifts were 0.1% (7/6154) for quetiapine versus 0.0% (1/3007) for placebo. Children and Adolescents: In acute placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescent patients with schizophrenia (6-week duration) or bipolar mania (3-week duration), the incidence of shifts for thyroid function values at any time for SEROQUEL treated patients and placebo-treated patients for elevated TSH was 2.9% (8/280) vs. 0.7% (1/138), respectively and for decreased total thyroxine was 2.8% (8/289) vs. 0% (0/145, respectively). Of the SEROQUEL treated patients with elevated TSH levels, 1 had simultaneous low free T4 level at end of treatment. 5.14 Hyperprolactinemia Adults: During clinical trials with quetiapine, the incidence of shifts in prolactin levels to a clinically significant value occurred in 3.6% (158/4416) of patients treated with quetiapine compared to 2.6% (51/1968) on placebo. Children and Adolescents: In acute placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescent patients with bipolar mania (3-week duration) or schizophrenia (6-week duration), the incidence of shifts in prolactin levels to a value (>20 µg/L males; > 26 µg/L females at any time) was 13.4% (18/134) for SEROQUEL compared to 4% (3/75) for placebo in males and 8.7% (9/104) for SEROQUEL compared to 0% (0/39) for placebo in females. Like other drugs that antagonize dopamine D2 receptors, SEROQUEL elevates prolactin levels in some patients and the elevation may persist during chronic administration. Hyperprolactinemia, regardless of etiology, may suppress hypothalamic GnRH, resulting in reduced pituitary gonadotrophin secretion. This, in turn, may inhibit reproductive function by impairing gonadal steroidogenesis in both female and male patients. Galactorrhea, amenorrhea, gynecomastia, and impotence have been reported in patients receiving prolactin-elevating compounds. Long-standing hyperprolactinemia when associated with hypogonadism may lead to decreased bone density in both female and male subjects. Tissue culture experiments indicate that approximately one-third of human breast cancers are prolactin dependent in vitro, a factor of potential importance if the prescription of these drugs is considered in a patient with previously detected breast cancer. As is common with compounds which increase prolactin release, mammary gland, and pancreatic islet cell neoplasia (mammary adenocarcinomas, pituitary and pancreatic adenomas) was observed in carcinogenicity studies conducted in mice and rats. Neither clinical studies nor epidemiologic studies conducted to date have shown an association between chronic administration of this class of drugs and tumorigenesis in humans, but the available evidence is too limited to be conclusive [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)]. 5.15 Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment Somnolence was a commonly reported adverse event reported in patients treated with SEROQUEL especially during the 3-5 day period of initial dose-titration. In schizophrenia trials, somnolence was reported in 18% (89/510) of patients on SEROQUEL compared to 11% (22/206) of placebo patients. In acute bipolar mania trials using SEROQUEL as monotherapy, somnolence was reported in 16% (34/209) of patients on SEROQUEL compared to 4% of placebo patients. In acute bipolar mania trials using SEROQUEL as adjunct therapy, somnolence was reported in 34% (66/196) of patients on SEROQUEL compared to 9% (19/203) of placebo patients. In bipolar depression trials, somnolence was reported in 57% (398/698) of patients on SEROQUEL compared to 15% (51/347) of placebo patients. Since SEROQUEL has the potential to impair judgment, thinking, or motor skills, patients should be cautioned about performing activities requiring mental alertness, such as operating a motor vehicle (including automobiles) or operating hazardous machinery until they are reasonably certain that SEROQUEL therapy does not affect them adversely. Somnolence may lead to falls. 5.16 Body Temperature Regulation Although not reported with SEROQUEL, disruption of the body's ability to reduce core body temperature has been attributed to antipsychotic agents. Appropriate care is advised when prescribing SEROQUEL for patients who will be experiencing conditions which may contribute to an elevation in core body temperature, e.g., exercising strenuously, exposure to extreme heat, receiving concomitant medication with anticholinergic activity, or being subject to dehydration. 5.17 Dysphagia Esophageal dysmotility and aspiration have been associated with antipsychotic drug use. Aspiration pneumonia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, in particular those with advanced Alzheimer's dementia. SEROQUEL and other antipsychotic drugs should be used cautiously in patients at risk for aspiration pneumonia. 5.18 Discontinuation Syndrome Acute withdrawal symptoms, such as insomnia, nausea, and vomiting have been described after abrupt cessation of atypical antipsychotic drugs, including SEROQUEL. In short-term placebo-controlled, monotherapy clinical trials with SEROQUEL XR that included a discontinuation phase which evaluated discontinuation symptoms, the aggregated incidence of patients experiencing one or more discontinuation symptoms after abrupt cessation was 12.1% (241/1993) for SEROQUEL XR and 6.7% (71/1065) for placebo. The incidence of the individual adverse events (i.e., insomnia, nausea, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, dizziness and irritability) did not exceed 5.3% in any treatment group and usually resolved after 1 week post-discontinuation. Gradual withdrawal is advised.
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following adverse reactions are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling: •Increased mortality in elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Suicidal thoughts and behaviors in adolescents and young adults [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] •Cerebrovascular adverse reactions, including stroke in elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions 5.3] •Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) [see Warnings and Precautions 5.4] •Metabolic changes (hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, weight gain) [see Warnings and Precautions 5.5] •Tardive dyskinesia [see Warnings and Precautions 5.6] •Hypotension [see Warnings and Precautions 5.7] •Increases in blood pressure (children and adolescents) [see Warnings and Precautions 5.8] •Leukopenia, neutropenia and agranulocytosis [see Warnings and Precautions 5.9] •Cataracts [see Warnings and Precautions 5.10] •QT Prolongation [see Warnings and Precautions 5.11] •Seizures [see Warnings and Precautions 5.12] •Hypothyroidism [see Warnings and Precautions 5.13] •Hyperprolactinemia [see Warnings and Precautions 5.14] •Potential for cognitive and motor impairment [see Warnings and Precautions 5.15] •Body temperature regulation [see Warnings and Precautions 5.16] •Dysphagia [see Warnings and Precautions 5.17] •Discontinuation Syndrome [see Warnings and Precautions 5.18] Most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥5% and twice placebo): Adults: somnolence, dry mouth, dizziness, constipation, asthenia, abdominal pain, postural hypotension, pharyngitis, weight gain, lethargy, ALT increased, dyspepsia (6.1) Children and Adolescents: somnolence, dizziness, fatigue, increased appetite, nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, tachycardia, weight increased (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact AstraZeneca at 1-800-236-9933 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Study Experience Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Adults: The information below is derived from a clinical trial database for SEROQUEL consisting of over 4300 patients. This database includes 698 patients exposed to SEROQUEL for the treatment of bipolar depression, 405 patients exposed to SEROQUEL for the treatment of acute bipolar mania (monotherapy and adjunct therapy), 646 patients exposed to SEROQUEL for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder as adjunct therapy, and approximately 2600 patients and/or normal subjects exposed to 1 or more doses of SEROQUEL for the treatment of schizophrenia. Of these approximately 4300 subjects, approximately 4000 (2300 in schizophrenia, 405 in acute bipolar mania, 698 in bipolar depression, and 646 for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder) were patients who participated in multiple dose effectiveness trials, and their experience corresponded to approximately 2400 patient-years. The conditions and duration of treatment with SEROQUEL varied greatly and included (in overlapping categories) open-label and double-blind phases of studies, inpatients and outpatients, fixed-dose and dose-titration studies, and short-term or longer-term exposure. Adverse reactions were assessed by collecting adverse events, results of physical examinations, vital signs, weights, laboratory analyses, ECGs, and results of ophthalmologic examinations. The stated frequencies of adverse reactions represent the proportion of individuals who experienced, at least once, a treatment-emergent adverse reaction of the type listed. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials Schizophrenia: Overall, there was little difference in the incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions (4% for SEROQUEL vs. 3% for placebo) in a pool of controlled trials. However, discontinuations due to somnolence (0.8% SEROQUEL vs. 0% placebo) and hypotension (0.4% SEROQUEL vs. 0% placebo) were considered to be drug related [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7 and 5.18)]. Bipolar Disorder: Mania: Overall, discontinuations due to adverse reactions were 5.7% for SEROQUEL vs. 5.1% for placebo in monotherapy and 3.6% for SEROQUEL vs. 5.9% for placebo in adjunct therapy. Depression: Overall, discontinuations due to adverse reactions were 12.3% for SEROQUEL 300 mg vs. 19.0% for SEROQUEL 600 mg and 5.2% for placebo. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials: In the acute therapy of schizophrenia (up to 6 weeks) and bipolar mania (up to 12 weeks) trials, the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of SEROQUEL monotherapy (incidence of 5% or greater) and observed at a rate on SEROQUEL at least twice that of placebo were somnolence (18%), dizziness (11%), dry mouth (9%), constipation (8%), ALT increased (5%), weight gain (5%), and dyspepsia (5%). Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More Among SEROQUEL Treated Patients in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials: The prescriber should be aware that the figures in the tables and tabulations cannot be used to predict the incidence of side effects in the course of usual medical practice where patient characteristics and other factors differ from those that prevailed in the clinical trials. Similarly, the cited frequencies cannot be compared with figures obtained from other clinical investigations involving different treatments, uses, and investigators. The cited figures, however, do provide the prescribing physician with some basis for estimating the relative contribution of drug and nondrug factors to the side effect incidence in the population studied. Table 9 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy of schizophrenia (up to 6 weeks) and bipolar mania (up to 12 weeks) in 2% or more of patients treated with SEROQUEL (doses ranging from 75 to 800 mg/day) where the incidence in patients treated with SEROQUEL was greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients. Table 9: Adverse Reaction Incidence in 3- to 12-Week Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Mania (Monotherapy) Preferred Term SEROQUEL (n=719) PLACEBO (n=404) Headache 21% 14% Agitation 20% 17% Somnolence 18% 8% Dizziness 11% 5% Dry Mouth 9% 3% Constipation 8% 3% Pain 7% 5% Tachycardia 6% 4% Vomiting 6% 5% Asthenia 5% 3% Dyspepsia 5% 1% Weight Gain 5% 1% ALT Increased 5% 1% Anxiety 4% 3% Pharyngitis 4% 3% Rash 4% 2% Abdominal Pain 4% 1% Postural Hypotension 4% 1% Back Pain 3% 1% AST Increased 3% 1% Rhinitis 3% 1% Fever 2% 1% Gastroenteritis 2% 0% Amblyopia 2% 1% In the acute adjunct therapy of bipolar mania (up to 3 weeks) studies, the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of SEROQUEL (incidence of 5% or greater) and observed at a rate on SEROQUEL at least twice that of placebo were somnolence (34%), dry mouth (19%), asthenia (10%), constipation (10%), abdominal pain (7%), postural hypotension (7%), pharyngitis (6%), and weight gain (6%). Table 10 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during therapy (up to 3 weeks) of acute mania in 2% or more of patients treated with SEROQUEL (doses ranging from 100 to 800 mg/day) used as adjunct therapy to lithium and divalproex where the incidence in patients treated with SEROQUEL was greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients. Table 10: Adverse Reaction Incidence in 3-Week Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Bipolar Mania (Adjunct Therapy) Preferred Term SEROQUEL (n=196) PLACEBO (n=203) Somnolence 34% 9% Dry Mouth 19% 3% Headache 17% 13% Asthenia 10% 4% Constipation 10% 5% Dizziness 9% 6% Tremor 8% 7% Abdominal Pain 7% 3% Postural Hypotension 7% 2% Agitation 6% 4% Weight Gain 6% 3% Pharyngitis 6% 3% Back Pain 5% 3% Hypertonia 4% 3% Rhinitis 4% 2% Peripheral Edema 4% 2% Twitching 4% 1% Dyspepsia 4% 3% Depression 3% 2% Amblyopia 3% 2% Speech Disorder 3% 1% Hypotension 3% 1% Hormone Level Altered 3% 0% Heaviness 2% 1% Infection 2% 1% Fever 2% 1% Hypertension 2% 1% Tachycardia 2% 1% Increased Appetite 2% 1% Hypothyroidism 2% 1% Incoordination 2% 1% Thinking Abnormal 2% 0% Anxiety 2% 0% Ataxia 2% 0% Sinusitis 2% 1% Sweating 2% 1% Urinary Tract Infection 2% 1% In bipolar depression studies (up to 8 weeks), the most commonly observed treatment emergent adverse reactions associated with the use of SEROQUEL (incidence of 5% or greater) and observed at a rate on SEROQUEL at least twice that of placebo were somnolence (57%), dry mouth (44%), dizziness (18%), constipation (10%), and lethargy (5%). Table 11 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during therapy (up to 8 weeks) of bipolar depression in 2% or more of patients treated with SEROQUEL (doses of 300 and 600 mg/day) where the incidence in patients treated with SEROQUEL was greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients. Table 11: Adverse Reaction Incidence in 8-Week Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Bipolar Depression Preferred Term SEROQUEL (n=698) PLACEBO (n=347) SomnolenceSomnolence combines adverse reaction terms somnolence and sedation 57% 15% Dry Mouth 44% 13% Dizziness 18% 7% Constipation 10% 4% Fatigue 10% 8% Dyspepsia 7% 4% Vomiting 5% 4% Increased Appetite 5% 3% Lethargy 5% 2% Nasal Congestion 5% 3% Orthostatic Hypotension 4% 3% Akathisia 4% 1% Palpitations 4% 1% Vision Blurred 4% 2% Weight increased 4% 1% Arthralgia 3% 2% Paraesthesia 3% 2% Cough 3% 1% Extrapyramidal Disorder 3% 1% Irritability 3% 1% Dysarthria 3% 0% Hypersomnia 3% 0% Sinus Congestion 2% 1% Abnormal Dreams 2% 1% Tremor 2% 1% Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease 2% 1% Pain in Extremity 2% 1% Asthenia 2% 1% Balance Disorder 2% 1% Hypoaesthesia 2% 1% Dysphagia 2% 0% Restless Legs Syndrome 2% 0% Explorations for interactions on the basis of gender, age, and race did not reveal any clinically meaningful differences in the adverse reaction occurrence on the basis of these demographic factors. Dose Dependency of Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials Dose-related Adverse Reactions: Spontaneously elicited adverse reaction data from a study of schizophrenia comparing five fixed doses of SEROQUEL (75 mg, 150 mg, 300 mg, 600 mg, and 750 mg/day) to placebo were explored for dose-relatedness of adverse reactions. Logistic regression analyses revealed a positive dose response (p<0.05) for the following adverse reactions: dyspepsia, abdominal pain, and weight gain. Adverse Reactions in clinical trials with quetiapine and not listed elsewhere in the label: The following adverse reactions have also been reported with quetiapine: nightmares, hypersensitivity and elevations in serum creatine phosphokinase (not associated with NMS), galactorrhea, bradycardia (which may occur at or near initiation of treatment and be associated with hypotension and/ or syncope), decreased platelets, somnambulism (and other related events), elevations in gamma-GT levels, hypothermia, and priapism. Extrapyramidal Symptoms (EPS): Dystonia Class Effect: Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment. Dystonic symptoms include: spasm of the neck muscles, sometimes progressing to tightness of the throat, swallowing difficulty, difficulty breathing, and/or protrusion of the tongue. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, they occur more frequently and with greater severity with high potency and at higher doses of first generation antipsychotic drugs. An elevated risk of acute dystonia is observed in males and younger age groups. Four methods were used to measure EPS: (1) Simpson-Angus total score (mean change from baseline) which evaluates Parkinsonism and akathisia, (2) Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS) Global Assessment Score, (3) incidence of spontaneous complaints of EPS (akathisia, akinesia, cogwheel rigidity, extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, hypokinesia, neck rigidity, and tremor), and (4) use of anticholinergic medications to treat emergent EPS. Adults: Data from one 6-week clinical trial of schizophrenia comparing five fixed doses of SEROQUEL (75, 150, 300, 600, 750 mg/day) provided evidence for the lack of treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and dose-relatedness for EPS associated with SEROQUEL treatment. Three methods were used to measure EPS: (1) Simpson-Angus total score (mean change from baseline) which evaluates Parkinsonism and akathisia, (2) incidence of spontaneous complaints of EPS (akathisia, akinesia, cogwheel rigidity, extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, hypokinesia, neck rigidity, and tremor), and (3) use of anticholinergic medications to treat emergent EPS. In Table 12, dystonic event included nuchal rigidity, hypertonia, dystonia, muscle rigidity, oculogyration; parkinsonism included cogwheel rigidity, tremor, drooling, hypokinesia; akathisia included akathisia, psychomotor agitation; dyskinetic event included tardive dyskinesia, dyskinesia, choreoathetosis; and other extrapyramidal event included restlessness, extrapyramidal disorder, movement disorder. Table 12: Adverse reactions associated with EPS in a short-term, placebo-controlled multiple fixed-dose Phase III schizophrenia trial (6 weeks duration) Preferred Term SEROQUEL 75 mg/day (N=53) SEROQUEL 150 mg/day (N=48) SEROQUEL 300 mg/day (N=52) SEROQUEL 600 mg/day (N=51) SEROQUEL 750 mg/day (N=54) Placebo (N=51) n % n % n % n % n % n % Dystonic event 2 3.8 2 4.2 0 0.0 2 3.9 3 5.6 4 7.8 Parkinsonism 2 3.8 0 0.0 1 1.9 1 2.0 1 1.9 4 7.8 Akathisia 1 1.9 1 2.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 1.9 4 7.8 Dyskinetic event 2 3.8 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 2.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 Other extrapyramidal event 2 3.8 0 0.0 3 5.8 3 5.9 1 1.9 4 7.8 Parkinsonism incidence rates as measured by the Simpson-Angus total score for placebo and the five fixed doses (75, 150, 300, 600, 750 mg/day) were: -0.6; -1.0, -1.2; -1.6; -1.8 and -1.8. The rate of anticholinergic medication use to treat emergent EPS for placebo and the five fixed doses was: 14%; 11%; 10%; 8%; 12% and 11%. In six additional placebo-controlled clinical trials (3 in acute mania and 3 in schizophrenia) using variable doses of SEROQUEL, there were no differences between the SEROQUEL and placebo treatment groups in the incidence of EPS, as assessed by Simpson-Angus total scores, spontaneous complaints of EPS and the use of concomitant anticholinergic medications to treat EPS. In two placebo-controlled clinical trials for the treatment of bipolar depression using 300 mg and 600 mg of SEROQUEL, the incidence of adverse reactions potentially related to EPS was 12% in both dose groups and 6% in the placebo group. In these studies, the incidence of the individual adverse reactions (akathisia, extrapyramidal disorder, tremor, dyskinesia, dystonia, restlessness, muscle contractions involuntary, psychomotor hyperactivity and muscle rigidity) were generally low and did not exceed 4% in any treatment group. The 3 treatment groups were similar in mean change in SAS total score and BARS Global Assessment score at the end of treatment. The use of concomitant anticholinergic medications was infrequent and similar across the three treatment groups. Children and Adolescents The information below is derived from a clinical trial database for SEROQUEL consisting of over 1000 pediatric patients. This database includes 677 patients exposed to SEROQUEL for the treatment of schizophrenia and 393 children and adolescents (10-17 years old) exposed to SEROQUEL for the treatment of acute bipolar mania. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials Schizophrenia: The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions for quetiapine-treated and placebo-treated patients was 8.2% and 2.7%, respectively. The adverse event leading to discontinuation in 1% or more of patients on SEROQUEL and at a greater incidence than placebo was somnolence (2.7% and 0% for placebo). Bipolar I Mania: The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions for quetiapine-treated and placebo-treated patients was 11.4% and 4.4%, respectively. The adverse reactions leading to discontinuation in 2% or more of patients on SEROQUEL and at a greater incidence than placebo were somnolence (4.1% vs. 1.1%) and fatigue (2.1% vs. 0). Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials In therapy for schizophrenia (up to 6 weeks), the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of quetiapine in adolescents (incidence of 5% or greater and quetiapine incidence at least twice that for placebo) were somnolence (34%), dizziness (12%), dry mouth (7%), tachycardia (7%). In bipolar mania therapy (up to 3 weeks) the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of quetiapine in children and adolescents (incidence of 5% or greater and quetiapine incidence at least twice that for placebo) were somnolence (53%), dizziness (18%), fatigue (11%), increased appetite (9%), nausea (8%), vomiting (8%), tachycardia (7%), dry mouth (7%), and weight increased (6%). In an acute (8-week) SEROQUEL XR trial in children and adolescents (10-17 years of age) with bipolar depression, in which efficacy was not established, the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of SEROQUEL XR (incidence of 5% or greater and at least twice that for placebo) were dizziness (7%), diarrhea (5%), fatigue (5%) and nausea (5%). Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of ≥ 2% Among SEROQUEL Treated Patients in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials Schizophrenia (Adolescents, 13 – 17 years old) The following findings were based on a 6-week placebo-controlled trial in which quetiapine was administered in either doses of 400 or 800 mg/day. Table 13 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of treatment-emergent adverse reactions that occurred during therapy (up to 6 weeks) of schizophrenia in 2% or more of patients treated with SEROQUEL (doses of 400 or 800 mg/day) where the incidence in patients treated with SEROQUEL was at least twice the incidence in placebo-treated patients. Adverse events that were potentially dose-related with higher frequency in the 800 mg group compared to the 400 mg group included dizziness (8% vs. 15%), dry mouth (4% vs. 10%), and tachycardia (6% vs. 11%). Table 13: Adverse Reaction Incidence in a 6-Week Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial for the Treatment of Schizophrenia in Adolescent Patients Preferred Term SEROQUEL 400 mg (n=73) SEROQUEL 800 mg (n=74) Placebo (n=75) SomnolenceSomnolence combines adverse reaction terms somnolence and sedation. 33% 35% 11% Dizziness 8% 15% 5% Dry Mouth 4% 10% 1% TachycardiaTachycardia combines adverse reaction terms tachycardia and sinus tachycardia. 6% 11% 0% Irritability 3% 5% 0% Arthralgia 1% 3% 0% Asthenia 1% 3% 1% Back Pain 1% 3% 0% Dyspnea 0% 3% 0% Abdominal Pain 3% 1% 0% Anorexia 3% 1% 0% Tooth Abscess 3% 1% 0% Dyskinesia 3% 0% 0% Epistaxis 3% 0% 1% Muscle Rigidity 3% 0% 0% Bipolar I Mania (Children and Adolescents 10 to 17 years old) The following findings were based on a 3-week placebo-controlled trial in which quetiapine was administered in either doses of 400 or 600 mg/day. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions In bipolar mania therapy (up to 3 weeks) the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of quetiapine in children and adolescents (incidence of 5% or greater and quetiapine incidence at least twice that for placebo) were somnolence (53%), dizziness (18%), fatigue (11%), increased appetite (9%), nausea (8%), vomiting (8%), tachycardia (7%), dry mouth (7%), and weight increased (6%). Table 14 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of treatment-emergent adverse reactions that occurred during therapy (up to 3 weeks) of bipolar mania in 2% or more of patients treated with SEROQUEL (doses of 400 or 600 mg/day) where the incidence in patients treated with SEROQUEL was greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients. Adverse events that were potentially dose-related with higher frequency in the 600 mg group compared to the 400 mg group included somnolence (50% vs. 57%), nausea (6% vs. 10 %) and tachycardia (6% vs. 9%). Table 14: Adverse Reactions in a 3-Week Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial for the Treatment of Bipolar Mania in Children and Adolescent Patients Preferred Term SEROQUEL 400 mg (n=95) SEROQUEL 600 mg (n=98) Placebo (n=90) SomnolenceSomnolence combines adverse reactions terms somnolence and sedation. 50% 57% 14% Dizziness 19% 17% 2% Nausea 6% 10% 4% Fatigue 14% 9% 4% Increased Appetite 10% 9% 1% TachycardiaTachycardia combines adverse reaction terms tachycardia and sinus tachycardia. 6% 9% 1% Dry Mouth 7% 7% 0% Vomiting 8% 7% 3% Nasal Congestion 3% 6% 2% Weight Increased 6% 6% 0% Irritability 3% 5% 1% Pyrexia 1% 4% 1% Aggression 1% 3% 0% Musculoskeletal Stiffness 1% 3% 1% Accidental Overdose 0% 2% 0% Acne 3% 2% 0% Arthralgia 4% 2% 1% Lethargy 2% 2% 0% Pallor 1% 2% 0% Stomach Discomfort 4% 2% 1% Syncope 2% 2% 0% Vision Blurred 3% 2% 0% Constipation 4% 2% 0% Ear Pain 2% 0% 0% Paraesthesia 2% 0% 0% Sinus Congestion 3% 0% 0% Thirst 2% 0% 0% Extrapyramidal Symptoms: In a short-term placebo-controlled monotherapy trial in adolescent patients with schizophrenia (6-week duration), the aggregated incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms was 12.9% (19/147) for SEROQUEL and 5.3% (4/75) for placebo, though the incidence of the individual adverse events (akathisia, tremor, extrapyramidal disorder, hypokinesia, restlessness, psychomotor hyperactivity, muscle rigidity, dyskinesia) did not exceed 4.1% in any treatment group. In a short-term placebo-controlled monotherapy trial in children and adolescent patients with bipolar mania (3-week duration), the aggregated incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms was 3.6% (7/193) or SEROQUEL and 1.1% (1/90) for placebo. Table 15 presents a listing of patients with adverse reactions potentially associated with extrapyramidal symptoms in the short-term placebo-controlled monotherapy trial in adolescent patients with schizophrenia (6-week duration). In Tables 15 – 16 dystonic event included nuchal rigidity, hypertonia and muscle rigidity; parkinsonism included cogwheel rigidity and tremor; akathisia included akathisia only dyskinetic event included tardive dyskinesia, dyskinesia and choreoathetosis; and other extrapyramidal event included restlessness and extrapyramidal disorder. Table 15: Adverse Reactions Associated with Extrapyramidal Symptoms in the Placebo-Controlled Trial in Adolescent Patients with Schizophrenia (6-week duration) Preferred Term SEROQUEL 400 mg/day (N=73) SEROQUEL 800 mg/day (N=74) All SEROQUEL (N=147) Placebo (N=75) n % n % n % n % Dystonic event 2 2.7 0 0.0 2 1.4 0 0.0 Parkinsonism 4 5.5 4 5.4 8 5.4 2 2.7 Akathisia 3 4.1 4 5.4 7 4.8 3 4.0 Dyskinetic event 2 2.7 0 0.0 2 1.4 0 0.0 Other Extrapyramidal Event 2 2.7 2 2.7 4 2.7 0 0.0 Table 16 presents a listing of patients with adverse reactions associated with extrapyramidal symptoms in a short-term placebo-controlled monotherapy trial in children and adolescent patients with bipolar mania (3-week duration). Table 16: Adverse Reactions Associated with Extrapyramidal Symptoms in a Placebo-Controlled Trial in Children and Adolescent Patients with Bipolar I Mania (3-week duration) Preferred Term There were no adverse experiences with the preferred term of dystonic or dyskinetic events. SEROQUEL 400 mg/day (N=95) SEROQUEL 600 mg/day (N=98) All SEROQUEL (N=193) Placebo (N=90) n % n % n % n % Parkinsonism 2 2.1 1 1.0 3 1.6 1 1.1 Akathisia 1 1.0 1 1.0 2 1.0 0 0.0 Other Extrapyramidal Event 1 1.1 1 1.0 2 1.0 0 0.0 Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Pre-Marketing Evaluation of SEROQUEL Following is a list of COSTART terms that reflect treatment-emergent adverse reactions as defined in the introduction to the ADVERSE REACTIONS section reported by patients treated with SEROQUEL at multiple doses > 75 mg/day during any phase of a trial within the premarketing database of approximately 2200 patients treated for schizophrenia. All reported reactions are included except those already listed in the tables or elsewhere in labeling, those reactions for which a drug cause was remote, and those reaction terms which were so general as to be uninformative. It is important to emphasize that, although the reactions reported occurred during treatment with SEROQUEL, they were not necessarily caused by it. Reactions are further categorized by body system and listed in order of decreasing frequency according to the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients (only those not already listed in the tabulated results from placebo-controlled trials appear in this listing); infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients; rare reactions are those occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients. Nervous System: Infrequent: abnormal dreams, dyskinesia, thinking abnormal, tardive dyskinesia, vertigo, involuntary movements, confusion, amnesia, psychosis, hallucinations, hyperkinesia, libido increased, urinary retention, incoordination, paranoid reaction, abnormal gait, myoclonus, delusions, manic reaction, apathy, ataxia, depersonalization, stupor, bruxism, catatonic reaction, hemiplegia; Rare: aphasia, buccoglossal syndrome, choreoathetosis, delirium, emotional lability, euphoria, libido decreased, neuralgia, stuttering, subdural hematoma. Body as a Whole: Frequent: flu syndrome; Infrequent: neck pain, pelvic pain suicide attempt, malaise, photosensitivity reaction, chills, face edema, moniliasis; Rare: abdomen enlarged. Digestive System: Frequent: anorexia; Infrequent: increased salivation, increased appetite, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase increased, gingivitis, dysphagia, flatulence, gastroenteritis, gastritis, hemorrhoids, stomatitis, thirst, tooth caries, fecal incontinence, gastroesophageal reflux, gum hemorrhage, mouth ulceration, rectal hemorrhage, tongue edema; Rare: glossitis, hematemesis, intestinal obstruction, melena, pancreatitis. Cardiovascular System: Infrequent: vasodilatation, QT interval prolonged, migraine, bradycardia, cerebral ischemia, irregular pulse, T wave abnormality, bundle branch block, cerebrovascular accident, deep thrombophlebitis, T wave inversion; Rare: angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation, AV block first degree, congestive heart failure, ST elevated, thrombophlebitis, T wave flattening, ST abnormality, increased QRS duration. Respiratory System: Frequent: cough increased, dyspnea; Infrequent: pneumonia, epistaxis, asthma; Rare: hiccup, hyperventilation. Metabolic and Nutritional System: Infrequent: weight loss, alkaline phosphatase increased, hyperlipemia, alcohol intolerance, dehydration, hyperglycemia, creatinine increased, hypoglycemia; Rare: glycosuria, gout, hand edema, hypokalemia, water intoxication. Skin and Appendages System: Infrequent: pruritus, acne, eczema, contact dermatitis, maculopapular rash, seborrhea, skin ulcer; Rare: exfoliative dermatitis, psoriasis, skin discoloration. Urogenital System: Infrequent: dysmenorrheal Adjusted for gender., vaginitis, urinary incontinence, metrorrhagia, impotence, dysuria, vaginal moniliasis, abnormal ejaculation, cystitis, urinary frequency, amenorrhea, female lactation, leukorrhea, vaginal hemorrhage, vulvovaginitis, orchitis; Rare: gynecomastia, nocturia, polyuria, acute kidney failure. Special Senses: Infrequent: conjunctivitis, abnormal vision, dry eyes, tinnitus, taste perversion, blepharitis, eye pain; Rare: abnormality of accommodation, deafness, glaucoma. Musculoskeletal System: Infrequent: pathological fracture, myasthenia, twitching, arthralgia, arthritis, leg cramps, bone pain. Hemic and Lymphatic System: Infrequent: leukocytosis, anemia, ecchymosis, eosinophilia, hypochromic anemia; lymphadenopathy, cyanosis; Rare: hemolysis, thrombocytopenia. Endocrine System: Infrequent: hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus; Rare: hyperthyroidism. Laboratory, ECG and vital sign changes observed in clinical studies Laboratory Changes: Neutrophil Counts Adults: In placebo-controlled monotherapy clinical trials involving 3368 patients on quetiapine fumarate and 1515 on placebo, the incidence of at least one occurrence of neutrophil count <1.0 x 109/L among patients with a normal baseline neutrophil count and at least one available follow up laboratory measurement was 0.3% (10/2967) in patients treated with quetiapine fumarate, compared to 0.1% (2/1349) in patients treated with placebo [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)]. Transaminase Elevations Adults: Asymptomatic, transient and reversible elevations in serum transaminases (primarily ALT) have been reported. In schizophrenia trials in adults, the proportions of patients with transaminase elevations of > 3 times the upper limits of the normal reference range in a pool of 3- to 6-week placebo-controlled trials were approximately 6% (29/483) for SEROQUEL compared to 1% (3/194) for placebo. In acute bipolar mania trials in adults, the proportions of patients with transaminase elevations of > 3 times the upper limits of the normal reference range in a pool of 3- to 12-week placebo-controlled trials were approximately 1% for both SEROQUEL (3/560) and placebo (3/294). These hepatic enzyme elevations usually occurred within the first 3 weeks of drug treatment and promptly returned to pre-study levels with ongoing treatment with SEROQUEL. In bipolar depression trials, the proportions of patients with transaminase elevations of > 3 times the upper limits of the normal reference range in two 8-week placebo-controlled trials was 1% (5/698) for SEROQUEL and 2% (6/347) for placebo. Decreased Hemoglobin Adults: In short-term placebo-controlled trials, decreases in hemoglobin to ≤ 13 g/dL males, ≤ 12 g/dL females on at least one occasion occurred in 8.3% (594/7155) of quetiapine-treated patients compared to 6.2% (219/3536) of patients treated with placebo. In a database of controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials, decreases in hemoglobin to ≤ 13 g/dL males, ≤ 12 g/dL females on at least one occasion occurred in 11% (2277/20729) of quetiapine-treated patients. Interference with Urine Drug Screens There have been literature reports suggesting false positive results in urine enzyme immunoassays for methadone and tricyclic antidepressants in patients who have taken quetiapine. Caution should be exercised in the interpretation of positive urine drug screen results for these drugs, and confirmation by alternative analytical technique (e.g., chromatographic methods) should be considered. ECG Changes Adults: Between-group comparisons for pooled placebo-controlled trials revealed no statistically significant SEROQUEL/placebo differences in the proportions of patients experiencing potentially important changes in ECG parameters, including QT, QTc, and PR intervals. However, the proportions of patients meeting the criteria for tachycardia were compared in four 3- to 6-week placebo-controlled clinical trials for the treatment of schizophrenia revealing a 1% (4/399) incidence for SEROQUEL compared to 0.6% (1/156) incidence for placebo. In acute (monotherapy) bipolar mania trials the proportions of patients meeting the criteria for tachycardia was 0.5% (1/192) for SEROQUEL compared to 0% (0/178) incidence for placebo. In acute bipolar mania (adjunct) trials the proportions of patients meeting the same criteria was 0.6% (1/166) for SEROQUEL compared to 0% (0/171) incidence for placebo. In bipolar depression trials, no patients had heart rate increases to > 120 beats per minute. SEROQUEL use was associated with a mean increase in heart rate, assessed by ECG, of 7 beats per minute compared to a mean increase of 1 beat per minute among placebo patients. This slight tendency to tachycardia in adults may be related to SEROQUEL's potential for inducing orthostatic changes [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)]. Children and Adolescents: In the acute (6 week) schizophrenia trial in adolescents, increases in heart rate (> 110 bpm) occurred in 5.2% (3/73) of patients receiving SEROQUEL 400 mg and 8.5% (5/74) of patients receiving SEROQUEL 800 mg compared to 0% (0/75) of patients receiving placebo. Mean increases in heart rate were 3.8 bpm and 11.2 bpm for SEROQUEL 400 mg and 800 mg groups, respectively, compared to a decrease of 3.3 bpm in the placebo group [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)]. In the acute (3 week) bipolar mania trial in children and adolescents, increases in heart rate (> 110 bpm) occurred in 1.1% (1/89) of patients receiving SEROQUEL 400 mg and 4.7% (4/85) of patients receiving SEROQUEL 600 mg compared to 0% (0/98) of patients receiving placebo. Mean increases in heart rate were 12.8 bpm and 13.4 bpm for SEROQUEL 400 mg and 600 mg groups, respectively, compared to a decrease of 1.7 bpm in the placebo group [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)]. In an acute (8-week) SEROQUEL XR trial in children and adolescents (10-17 years of age) with bipolar depression, in which efficacy was not established, increases in heart rate (> 110 bpm 10-12 years and 13-17 years) occurred in 0% of patients receiving SEROQUEL XR and 1.2% of patients receiving placebo. Mean increases in heart rate were 3.4 bpm for SEROQUEL XR, compared to 0.3 bpm in the placebo group [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)]. 6.2 Post Marketing Experience The following adverse reactions were identified during post approval of SEROQUEL. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Adverse reactions reported since market introduction which were temporally related to quetiapine therapy include anaphylactic reaction, cardiomyopathy, hyponatremia, myocarditis, nocturnal enuresis, pancreatitis, retrograde amnesia, rhabdomyolysis, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN).
7 DRUG INTERACTIONS • Concomitant use of strong CYP3A4 inhibitors: Reduce quetiapine dose to one sixth when coadministered with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., ketoconazole, ritonavir) (2.5, 7.1, 12.3) • Concomitant use of strong CYP3A4 inducers: Increase quetiapine dose up to 5 fold when used in combination with a chronic treatment (more than 7-14 days) of potent CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., phenytoin, rifampin, St. John’s wort) (2.6, 7.1, 12.3) • Discontinuation of strong CYP3A4 inducers: Reduce quetiapine dose by 5 fold within 7-14 days of discontinuation of CYP3A4 inducers (2.6, 7.1, 12.3) 7.1 Effect of Other Drugs on Quetiapine The risks of using SEROQUEL in combination with other drugs have not been extensively evaluated in systematic studies. Given the primary CNS effects of SEROQUEL, caution should be used when it is taken in combination with other centrally acting drugs. SEROQUEL potentiated the cognitive and motor effects of alcohol in a clinical trial in subjects with selected psychotic disorders, and alcoholic beverages should be limited while taking quetiapine. Quetiapine exposure is increased by the prototype CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., ketoconazole, itraconazole, indinavir, ritonavir, nefazodone, etc.) and decreased by the prototype CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., phenytoin, carbamazepine, rifampin, avasimibe, St. John’s wort etc.). Dose adjustment of quetiapine will be necessary if it is co-administered with potent CYP3A4 inducers or inhibitors. CYP3A4 inhibitors: Coadministration of ketoconazole, a potent inhibitor of cytochrome CYP3A4, resulted in significant increase in quetiapine exposure. The dose of SEROQUEL should be reduced to one sixth of the original dose if coadministered with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. CYP3A4 inducers: Coadministration of quetiapine and phenytoin, a CYP3A4 inducer increased the mean oral clearance of quetiapine by 5-fold. Increased doses of SEROQUEL up to 5 fold may be required to maintain control of symptoms of schizophrenia in patients receiving quetiapine and phenytoin, or other known potent CYP3A4 inducers [see Dosage and Administration (2.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. When the CYP3A4 inducer is discontinued, the dose of SEROQUEL should be reduced to the original level within 7-14 days [see Dosage and Administration (2.6)]. The potential effects of several concomitant medications on quetiapine pharmacokinetics were studied [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.2 Effect of Quetiapine on Other Drugs Because of its potential for inducing hypotension, SEROQUEL may enhance the effects of certain antihypertensive agents. SEROQUEL may antagonize the effects of levodopa and dopamine agonists. There are no clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions of Seroquel on other drugs based on the CYP pathway. Seroquel and its metabolites are non-inhibitors of major metabolizing CYPs (1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4).
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS • Pregnancy: Limited human data. Based on animal data, may cause fetal harm. Quetiapine should be used only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk (8.1) • Nursing Mothers: Discontinue drug or nursing, taking into consideration importance of drug to mother’s health (8.3) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C: Risk Summary There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of SEROQUEL use in pregnant women. In limited published literature, there were no major malformations associated with quetiapine exposure during pregnancy. In animal studies, embryo-fetal toxicity occurred. Quetiapine should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Human Data There are limited published data on the use of quetiapine for treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders during pregnancy. In a prospective observational study, 21 women exposed to quetiapine and other psychoactive medications during pregnancy delivered infants with no major malformations. Among 42 other infants born to pregnant women who used quetiapine during pregnancy, there were no major malformations reported (one study of 36 women, 6 case reports). Due to the limited number of exposed pregnancies, these postmarketing data do not reliably estimate the frequency or absence of adverse outcomes. Neonates exposed to antipsychotic drugs (including SEROQUEL), during the third trimester of pregnancy are at risk for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms following delivery. There have been reports of agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress and feeding disorder in these neonates. These complications have varied in severity; while in some cases symptoms have been self-limited, in other cases neonates have required intensive care unit support and prolonged hospitalization. Animal Data When pregnant rats and rabbits were exposed to quetiapine during organogenesis, there was no teratogenic effect at doses up to 2.4 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) for schizophrenia of 800 mg/day based on mg/m2 body surface area. However, there was evidence of embryo-fetal toxicity, which included delays in skeletal ossification occurring at approximately 1 and 2 times the MRHD of 800 mg/day in both rats and rabbits, and an increased incidence of carpal/tarsal flexure (minor soft tissue anomaly) in rabbit fetuses at approximately 2 times the MRHD. In addition, fetal weights were decreased in both species. Maternal toxicity (observed as decreased body weights and/or death) occurred at 2 times the MRHD in rats and approximately 1-2 times the MRHD (all doses tested) in rabbits. In a peri/postnatal reproductive study in rats, no drug-related effects were observed when pregnant dams were treated with quetiapine at doses 0.01, 0.12, and 0.24 times the MRHD of 800 mg/day based on mg/m2 body surface area. However, in a preliminary peri/postnatal study, there were increases in fetal and pup death, and decreases in mean litter weight at 3 times the MRHD. 8.2 Labor and Delivery The effect of SEROQUEL on labor and delivery in humans is unknown. 8.3 Nursing Mothers SEROQUEL was excreted into human milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from SEROQUEL, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother’s health. In published case reports, the level of quetiapine in breast milk ranged from undetectable to 170 μg/L. The estimated infant dose ranged from 0.09% to 0.43% of the weight-adjusted maternal dose. Based on a limited number (N=8) of mother/infant pairs, calculated infant daily doses range from less than 0.01 mg/kg (at a maternal daily dose up to 100 mg quetiapine) to 0.1 mg/kg (at a maternal daily dose of 400 mg). 8.4 Pediatric Use In general, the adverse reactions observed in children and adolescents during the clinical trials were similar to those in the adult population with few exceptions. Increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure occurred in children and adolescents and did not occur in adults. Orthostatic hypotension occurred more frequently in adults (4-7%) compared to children and adolescents (< 1%) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7) and Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Schizophrenia The efficacy and safety of SEROQUEL in the treatment of schizophrenia in adolescents aged 13 to 17 years were demonstrated in one 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial [see Indications and Usage (1.1), Dosage and Administration (2.2), Adverse Reactions (6.1), and Clinical Studies (14.1)]. Safety and effectiveness of SEROQUEL in pediatric patients less than 13 years of age with schizophrenia have not been established. Maintenance The safety and effectiveness of SEROQUEL in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder has not been established in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age. The safety and effectiveness of SEROQUEL in the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia has not been established in any patient population, including pediatric patients. Bipolar Mania The efficacy and safety of SEROQUEL in the treatment of mania in children and adolescents ages 10 to 17 years with Bipolar I disorder was demonstrated in a 3-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial [see Indications and Usage (1.2), Dosage and Administration (2.3), Adverse Reactions (6.1), and Clinical Studies (14.2)]. Safety and effectiveness of SEROQUEL in pediatric patients less than 10 years of age with bipolar mania have not been established. Bipolar Depression Safety and effectiveness of SEROQUEL in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age with bipolar depression have not been established. A clinical trial with SEROQUEL XR was conducted in children and adolescents (10 to 17 years of age) with bipolar depression, efficacy was not established. Some differences in the pharmacokinetics of quetiapine were noted between children/adolescents (10 to 17 years of age) and adults. When adjusted for weight, the AUC and Cmax of quetiapine were 41% and 39% lower, respectively, in children and adolescents compared to adults. The pharmacokinetics of the active metabolite, norquetiapine, were similar between children/adolescents and adults after adjusting for weight [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.5 Geriatric Use Of the approximately 3700 patients in clinical studies with SEROQUEL, 7% (232) were 65 years of age or over. In general, there was no indication of any different tolerability of SEROQUEL in the elderly compared to younger adults. Nevertheless, the presence of factors that might decrease pharmacokinetic clearance, increase the pharmacodynamic response to SEROQUEL, or cause poorer tolerance or orthostasis, should lead to consideration of a lower starting dose, slower titration, and careful monitoring during the initial dosing period in the elderly. The mean plasma clearance of SEROQUEL was reduced by 30% to 50% in elderly patients when compared to younger patients [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) and Dosage and Administration (2.3) ]. 8.6 Renal Impairment Clinical experience with SEROQUEL in patients with renal impairment is limited [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment Since quetiapine is extensively metabolized by the liver, higher plasma levels are expected in patients with hepatic impairment. In this population, a low starting dose of 25 mg/day is recommended and the dose may be increased in increments of 25 mg/day - 50 mg/day [see Dosage and Administration (2.4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ].

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You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
This Sounds Too Good To Be True. Is This A Scam?
Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
My Pharmacy Isn't Included. Can They Participate?
Yes! There are pharmacies who accept the pharmacy savings card that are not on our list. If you find one please email us and we'll update the list. If they are not a current partner and are interested, email us and we'll contact them to try and convince them to participate. You may also choose to call around and see if someone else in your area accepts it.
Is this the same as a Seroquel copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
Is there a less expensive generic version of Seroquel?
Yes there is a Generic Seroquel it should be significantly cheaper to purchase the generic version when using our card.
Similar Generic Medications
  • Quetiapine Fumarate
  • Savings of 70%!
    I want to thank you for your prescription card. My thyroid medicine was going to cost me $118 a month. Well, naturally, I thought of your card. Your site said for my 240 tablets a month it would be about $36. A savings of $82, or roughly 70%. Thank you for the relief your card has previously given to me now and in the past. - J. Donaldson
    Savings of over $200!
    Thank you for putting the medication discount card on the internet. I saved over 200 dollars On my prescription. I would have never been able to afford it had it not been for this product. Again I cannot thank you enough and keep up the good work!! - M. Axler
    Savings of over 50%!
    I had printed out 3 different discount cards on the internet and asked the pharmacist to check prices. The lowest price was $289. I searched the internet some more, I found this site, gave the pharmacy your card and the cost was $130. What a big savings, I can't thank this site enough. - Linda S.

    Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

    Accepted At Over 59,000 Pharmacies Nationwide!

    Including...
    • Including...
    • Cub Pharmacy
    • Kmart
    • HEB
    • Target
    • Winn Dixie
    • Costco
    • Safeway
    • Kroger
    • Tom Thumb
    • CVS
    • Brookshire`s
    • Rite Aid
    • Fred`s Pharmacy
    • Walmart
    • Long Drugs
    • Walgreens
    • Giant
    • Save Mart Pharmacy
    • Fred Meyer
    • We Care Pharmacy
    • Albertsons

    And thousands of independent pharmacies nationwide!

    Quetiapine ( /kwɨˈtaɪ.əpiːn/ kwi-TY-ə-peen) (branded as Seroquel, Xeroquel, Ketipinor), is an atypical antipsychotic approved for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and as an add-on to treat depression. Annual sales are approximately $5.7 billion worldwide, and $2.9 billion in the United States. The U.S. patent, which was set to expire in 2011, received a pediatric exclusivity extension which pushed its expiration to March 26, 2012. The patent has already expired in Canada. There are now several generic versions of quetiapine, such as Quepin and Ketipinor.

    Wikipedia contributors. "Seroquel" Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Jul 5, 2012. Web. Jul 6, 2012.

    Seroquel Coupon

    Currently we do not have any available, however you can receive an instant discount at your pharmacy with our Seroquel discount card. Create one instantly

    Important Note

    The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

    This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

    This Seroquel discount should not be confused with a Seroquel coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

    MedicationDiscountCard.com offers Average Savings of
    60.04%
    Compare us with the competition
    • Free Membership
    • No Health Restrictions
    • Use Immediately
    • Easy To Use
    • No Paperwork
    • Unlimited Use
    • Never Expires
    "My beloved Border Collie - named Mickey - was recently diagnosed with a form of plasmacytoma cancer and is on both Melphalan and Prednisone drugs as part of his monthly treatment. I printed out the prescription savings card and took it to my local pharmacist. I was so pleasantly surprised to know that the card indeed will save us money! I was able to buy the Melphalan chemotherapy drug for $34 less than the last 2 months, since we started treatment! Thanks so much!" - Mary L.
    Save up to 75% on your medication
    Save up to 75% on your medication