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Save Up To 75% With This Victoza Discount Card!

Looking for a Victoza Coupon?

Save Up To 75% With This Victoza Discount Card!

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Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Victoza discount card helps you save money on the exact same Victoza prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Victoza prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

Victoza is a drug that treats diabetes type 2. It controls blood sugar levels by causing the body to produce more insulin. According to Victoza reviews, this drug works very efficiently in treating type 2 diabetes and controlling blood sugar. A Victoza discount card can help you save money on this prescription medication.

Victoza Side Effects

Victoza reviews show that this drug does have side effects. The most notable side effects are:
  • Swelling or lumps in the throat area
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Hoarse voice
  • Weight gain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Confusion
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Upset stomach
As with any other medication, be aware of signs of an allergic and potentially life-threatening reaction, such as difficulty breathing, hives, and swelling of the throat, lips, or tongue.

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Victoza reviews on multiple forums indicate that patients find this medication extremely expensive, but you can save money on Victoza pricing. In order to save on Victoza pricing and obtain a Victoza discount card, just visit AffordRx.com, and choose "Print Card Now." You can start saving instantly!

"Victoza." Information from Drugs.com. Cerner Multum, Inc., 30 Aug. 2012. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
Information from Victoza.com. Novo Nordisk 2012. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
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  • ABC
  • NBC
  • FOX
  • CBS
  • San Francisco Chronicle
  • About.com
  • CIO
  • Boston.com
Estimated Savings Of Over $9,863,395

Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Victoza discount card helps you save money on the exact same Victoza prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Victoza prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

Victoza is a drug that treats diabetes type 2. It controls blood sugar levels by causing the body to produce more insulin. According to Victoza reviews, this drug works very efficiently in treating type 2 diabetes and controlling blood sugar. A Victoza discount card can help you save money on this prescription medication.

Victoza Side Effects

Victoza reviews show that this drug does have side effects. The most notable side effects are:
  • Swelling or lumps in the throat area
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Hoarse voice
  • Weight gain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Confusion
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Upset stomach
As with any other medication, be aware of signs of an allergic and potentially life-threatening reaction, such as difficulty breathing, hives, and swelling of the throat, lips, or tongue.

Save on Victoza Pricing with a Victoza Discount Card
Victoza reviews on multiple forums indicate that patients find this medication extremely expensive, but you can save money on Victoza pricing. In order to save on Victoza pricing and obtain a Victoza discount card, just visit AffordRx.com, and choose "Print Card Now." You can start saving instantly!

"Victoza." Information from Drugs.com. Cerner Multum, Inc., 30 Aug. 2012. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
Information from Victoza.com. Novo Nordisk 2012. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
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Victoza prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Victoza safely and effectively.
Before taking Victoza please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Victoza.
WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS • Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) and Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)]. • Victoza is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (e.g. a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza [see Contraindications (4), Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. • Liraglutide causes thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined ( 5.1 , 13.1). • Victoza is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC or in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk of MTC and the symptoms of thyroid tumors (4, 5.1).
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE Victoza is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Victoza is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (1). Important Limitations of Use (1.1): •Not recommended as first-line therapy for patients inadequately controlled on diet and exercise (5.1). •Has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. Consider other antidiabetic therapies in patients with a history of pancreatitis (5.2). •Not for treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus or diabetic ketoacidosis. •Has not been studied in combination with prandial insulin. 1.1 Important Limitations of Use • Victoza is not recommended as first-line therapy for patients who have inadequate glycemic control on diet and exercise because of the uncertain relevance of the rodent C-cell tumor findings to humans. Prescribe Victoza only to patients for whom the potential benefits are considered to outweigh the potential risk [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. •Based on spontaneous postmarketing reports, acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis has been observed in patients treated with Victoza. Victoza has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for pancreatitis while using Victoza. Other antidiabetic therapies should be considered in patients with a history of pancreatitis. •Victoza is not a substitute for insulin. Victoza should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis, as it would not be effective in these settings. •The concurrent use of Victoza and prandial insulin has not been studied.
3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Solution for subcutaneous injection, pre-filled, multi-dose pen that delivers doses of 0.6 mg, 1.2 mg, or 1.8 mg (6 mg/mL, 3 mL). •Solution for subcutaneous injection, pre-filled, multi-dose pen that delivers doses of 0.6 mg, 1.2 mg, or 1.8 mg (6 mg/mL, 3 mL) (3).
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Victoza is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) or in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Victoza is contraindicated in patients with a prior serious hypersensitivity reaction to Victoza or to any of the product components. Victoza is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma or in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (4). Victoza is contraindicated in patients with a prior serious hypersensitivity reaction to Victoza or any of the product components (4).
5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS • Thyroid C-cell Tumors: See Boxed Warning (5.1). • Pancreatitis: Postmarketing reports, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis. Discontinue promptly if pancreatitis is suspected. Do not restart if pancreatitis is confirmed. Consider other antidiabetic therapies in patients with a history of pancreatitis (5.2). •Never share a Victoza pen between patients, even if the needle is changed (5.3). • Serious Hypoglycemia: Can occur when Victoza is used with an insulin secretagogue (e.g. a sulfonylurea) or insulin. Consider lowering the dose of the insulin secretagogue or insulin to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia (5.4). • Renal Impairment: Has been reported postmarketing, usually in association with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or dehydration which may sometimes require hemodialysis. Use caution when initiating or escalating doses of Victoza in patients with renal impairment (5.5). • Hypersensitivity: Postmarketing reports of serious hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., anaphylactic reactions and angioedema). The patient should discontinue Victoza and other suspect medications and promptly seek medical advice (5.6). • Macrovascular Outcomes: There have been no studies establishing conclusive evidence of macrovascular risk reduction with Victoza or any other antidiabetic drug (5.7). 5.1 Risk of Thyroid C-cell Tumors Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors (adenomas and/or carcinomas) at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)]. Malignant thyroid C-cell carcinomas were detected in rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza will cause thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Cases of MTC in patients treated with Victoza have been reported in the postmarketing period; the data in these reports are insufficient to establish or exclude a causal relationship between MTC and Victoza use in humans. Victoza is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC or in patients with MEN 2. Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (e.g. a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza. Such monitoring may increase the risk of unnecessary procedures, due to low test specificity for serum calcitonin and a high background incidence of thyroid disease. Significantly elevated serum calcitonin may indicate MTC and patients with MTC usually have calcitonin values >50 ng/L. If serum calcitonin is measured and found to be elevated, the patient should be further evaluated. Patients with thyroid nodules noted on physical examination or neck imaging should also be further evaluated. 5.2 Pancreatitis Based on spontaneous postmarketing reports, acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis, has been observed in patients treated with Victoza. After initiation of Victoza, observe patients carefully for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis (including persistent severe abdominal pain, sometimes radiating to the back and which may or may not be accompanied by vomiting). If pancreatitis is suspected, Victoza should promptly be discontinued and appropriate management should be initiated. If pancreatitis is confirmed, Victoza should not be restarted. Consider antidiabetic therapies other than Victoza in patients with a history of pancreatitis. In clinical trials of Victoza, there have been 13 cases of pancreatitis among Victoza-treated patients and 1 case in a comparator (glimepiride) treated patient (2.7 vs. 0.5 cases per 1000 patient-years). Nine of the 13 cases with Victoza were reported as acute pancreatitis and four were reported as chronic pancreatitis. In one case in a Victoza-treated patient, pancreatitis, with necrosis, was observed and led to death; however clinical causality could not be established. Some patients had other risk factors for pancreatitis, such as a history of cholelithiasis or alcohol abuse. 5.3 Never Share a Victoza Pen Between Patients Victoza pens must never be shared between patients, even if the needle is changed. Pen-sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. 5.4 Use with Medications Known to Cause Hypoglycemia Patients receiving Victoza in combination with an insulin secretagogue (e.g., sulfonylurea) or insulin may have an increased risk of hypoglycemia. The risk of hypoglycemia may be lowered by a reduction in the dose of sulfonylurea (or other concomitantly administered insulin secretagogues) or insulin [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. 5.5 Renal Impairment Victoza has not been found to be directly nephrotoxic in animal studies or clinical trials. There have been postmarketing reports of acute renal failure and worsening of chronic renal failure, which may sometimes require hemodialysis in Victoza-treated patients [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)] . Some of these events were reported in patients without known underlying renal disease. A majority of the reported events occurred in patients who had experienced nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or dehydration [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)] . Some of the reported events occurred in patients receiving one or more medications known to affect renal function or hydration status. Altered renal function has been reversed in many of the reported cases with supportive treatment and discontinuation of potentially causative agents, including Victoza. Use caution when initiating or escalating doses of Victoza in patients with renal impairment [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6)] . 5.6 Hypersensitivity Reactions There have been postmarketing reports of serious hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., anaphylactic reactions and angioedema) in patients treated with Victoza. If a hypersensitivity reaction occurs, the patient should discontinue Victoza and other suspect medications and promptly seek medical advice. Angioedema has also been reported with other GLP-1 receptor agonists. Use caution in a patient with a history of angioedema with another GLP-1 receptor agonist because it is unknown whether such patients will be predisposed to angioedema with Victoza. 5.7 Macrovascular Outcomes There have been no clinical studies establishing conclusive evidence of macrovascular risk reduction with Victoza or any other antidiabetic drug.
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are described below or elsewhere in the prescribing information: •Risk of Thyroid C-cell Tumors [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Pancreatitis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] •Use with Medications Known to Cause Hypoglycemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4) ] •Renal Impairment [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) ] •Hypersensitivity Reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6) ] •The most common adverse reactions, reported in ≥5% of patients treated with Victoza and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo, are: headache, nausea, diarrhea and anti-liraglutide antibody formation (6). •Immunogenicity-related events, including urticaria, were more common among Victoza-treated patients (0.8%) than among comparator-treated patients (0.4%) in clinical trials (6). To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Novo Nordisk Inc. at 1-877-484-2869 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The safety of Victoza has been evaluated in 8 clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14)]: •A double-blind 52-week monotherapy trial compared Victoza 1.2 mg daily, Victoza 1.8 mg daily, and glimepiride 8 mg daily. •A double-blind 26 week add-on to metformin trial compared Victoza 0.6 mg once-daily, Victoza 1.2 mg once-daily, Victoza 1.8 mg once-daily, placebo, and glimepiride 4 mg once-daily. •A double-blind 26 week add-on to glimepiride trial compared Victoza 0.6 mg daily, Victoza 1.2 mg once-daily, Victoza 1.8 mg once-daily, placebo, and rosiglitazone 4 mg once-daily. •A 26 week add-on to metformin + glimepiride trial, compared double-blind Victoza 1.8 mg once-daily, double-blind placebo, and open-label insulin glargine once-daily. •A double-blind 26-week add-on to metformin + rosiglitazone trial compared Victoza 1.2 mg once-daily, Victoza 1.8 mg once-daily and placebo. •An open-label 26-week add-on to metformin and/or sulfonylurea trial compared Victoza 1.8 mg once-daily and exenatide 10 mcg twice-daily. •An open-label 26-week add-on to metformin trial compared Victoza 1.2 mg once-daily, Victoza 1.8 mg once-daily, and sitagliptin 100 mg once-daily. •An open-label 26-week trial compared insulin detemir as add-on to Victoza 1.8 mg + metformin to continued treatment with Victoza + metformin alone. Withdrawals The incidence of withdrawal due to adverse events was 7.8% for Victoza-treated patients and 3.4% for comparator-treated patients in the five double-blind controlled trials of 26 weeks duration or longer. This difference was driven by withdrawals due to gastrointestinal adverse reactions, which occurred in 5.0% of Victoza-treated patients and 0.5% of comparator-treated patients. In these five trials, the most common adverse reactions leading to withdrawal for Victoza-treated patients were nausea (2.8% versus 0% for comparator) and vomiting (1.5% versus 0.1% for comparator). Withdrawal due to gastrointestinal adverse events mainly occurred during the first 2-3 months of the trials. Common adverse reactions Tables 1, 2, 3 and 4 summarize common adverse reactions (hypoglycemia is discussed separately) reported in seven of the eight controlled trials of 26 weeks duration or longer. Most of these adverse reactions were gastrointestinal in nature. In the five double-blind clinical trials of 26 weeks duration or longer, gastrointestinal adverse reactions were reported in 41% of Victoza-treated patients and were dose-related. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions occurred in 17% of comparator-treated patients. Common adverse reactions that occurred at a higher incidence among Victoza-treated patients included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dyspepsia and constipation. In the five double-blind and three open-label clinical trials of 26 weeks duration or longer, the percentage of patients who reported nausea declined over time. In the five double-blind trials approximately 13% of Victoza-treated patients and 2% of comparator-treated patients reported nausea during the first 2 weeks of treatment. In the 26-week open-label trial comparing Victoza to exenatide, both in combination with metformin and/or sulfonylurea, gastrointestinal adverse reactions were reported at a similar incidence in the Victoza and exenatide treatment groups (Table 3). In the 26-week open-label trial comparing Victoza 1.2 mg, Victoza 1.8 mg and sitagliptin 100 mg, all in combination with metformin, gastrointestinal adverse reactions were reported at a higher incidence with Victoza than sitagliptin (Table 4). In the remaining 26-week trial, all patients received Victoza 1.8 mg + metformin during a 12-week run-in period. During the run-in period, 167 patients (17% of enrolled total) withdrew from the trial: 76 (46% of withdrawals) of these patients doing so because of gastrointestinal adverse reactions and 15 (9% of withdrawals) doing so due to other adverse events. Only those patients who completed the run-in period with inadequate glycemic control were randomized to 26 weeks of add-on therapy with insulin detemir or continued, unchanged treatment with Victoza 1.8 mg + metformin. During this randomized 26-week period, diarrhea was the only adverse reaction reported in ≥5% of patients treated with Victoza 1.8 mg + metformin + insulin detemir (11.7%) and greater than in patients treated with Victoza 1.8 mg and metformin alone (6.9%). Table 1 Adverse reactions reported in ≥5% of Victoza-treated patients in a 52-week monotherapy trial All Victoza N = 497 Glimepiride N = 248 Adverse Reaction (%) (%) Nausea 28.4 8.5 Diarrhea 17.1 8.9 Vomiting 10.9 3.6 Constipation 9.9 4.8 Headache 9.1 9.3 Table 2 Adverse reactions reported in ≥5% of Victoza-treated patients and occurring more frequently with Victoza compared to placebo: 26-week combination therapy trials Add-on to Metformin Trial All Victoza + Metformin N = 724 Placebo + Metformin N = 121 Glimepiride + Metformin N = 242 Adverse Reaction (%) (%) (%) Nausea 15.2 4.1 3.3 Diarrhea 10.9 4.1 3.7 Headache 9.0 6.6 9.5 Vomiting 6.5 0.8 0.4 Add-on to Glimepiride Trial All Victoza + Glimepiride N = 695 Placebo + Glimepiride N = 114 Rosiglitazone + Glimepiride N = 231 Adverse Reaction (%) (%) (%) Nausea 7.5 1.8 2.6 Diarrhea 7.2 1.8 2.2 Constipation 5.3 0.9 1.7 Dyspepsia 5.2 0.9 2.6 Add-on to Metformin + Glimepiride Victoza 1.8 + Metformin + Glimepiride N = 230 Placebo + Metformin + Glimepiride N = 114 Glargine + Metformin + Glimepiride N = 232 Adverse Reaction (%) (%) (%) Nausea 13.9 3.5 1.3 Diarrhea 10.0 5.3 1.3 Headache 9.6 7.9 5.6 Dyspepsia 6.5 0.9 1.7 Vomiting 6.5 3.5 0.4 Add-on to Metformin + Rosiglitazone All Victoza + Metformin + Rosiglitazone N = 355 Placebo + Metformin + Rosiglitazone N = 175 Adverse Reaction (%) (%) Nausea 34.6 8.6 Diarrhea 14.1 6.3 Vomiting 12.4 2.9 Headache 8.2 4.6 Constipation 5.1 1.1 Table 3 Adverse Reactions reported in ≥5% of Victoza-treated patients in a 26-Week Open-Label Trial versus Exenatide Victoza 1.8 mg once daily + metformin and/or sulfonylurea N = 235 Exenatide 10 mcg twice daily + metformin and/or sulfonylurea N = 232 Adverse Reaction (%) (%) Nausea 25.5 28.0 Diarrhea 12.3 12.1 Headache 8.9 10.3 Dyspepsia 8.9 4.7 Vomiting 6.0 9.9 Constipation 5.1 2.6 Table 4 Adverse Reactions in ≥5% of Victoza-treated patients in a 26-Week Open-Label Trial versus Sitagliptin All Victoza + metformin N = 439 Sitagliptin 100 mg/day + metformin N = 219 Adverse Reaction (%) (%) Nausea 23.9 4.6 Headache 10.3 10.0 Diarrhea 9.3 4.6 Vomiting 8.7 4.1 Immunogenicity Consistent with the potentially immunogenic properties of protein and peptide pharmaceuticals, patients treated with Victoza may develop anti-liraglutide antibodies. Approximately 50-70% of Victoza-treated patients in the five double-blind clinical trials of 26 weeks duration or longer were tested for the presence of anti-liraglutide antibodies at the end of treatment. Low titers (concentrations not requiring dilution of serum) of anti-liraglutide antibodies were detected in 8.6% of these Victoza-treated patients. Sampling was not performed uniformly across all patients in the clinical trials, and this may have resulted in an underestimate of the actual percentage of patients who developed antibodies. Cross-reacting anti-liraglutide antibodies to native glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) occurred in 6.9% of the Victoza-treated patients in the double-blind 52-week monotherapy trial and in 4.8% of the Victoza-treated patients in the double-blind 26-week add-on combination therapy trials. These cross-reacting antibodies were not tested for neutralizing effect against native GLP-1, and thus the potential for clinically significant neutralization of native GLP-1 was not assessed. Antibodies that had a neutralizing effect on liraglutide in an in vitro assay occurred in 2.3% of the Victoza-treated patients in the double-blind 52-week monotherapy trial and in 1.0% of the Victoza-treated patients in the double-blind 26-week add-on combination therapy trials. Among Victoza-treated patients who developed anti-liraglutide antibodies, the most common category of adverse events was that of infections, which occurred among 40% of these patients compared to 36%, 34% and 35% of antibody-negative Victoza-treated, placebo-treated and active-control-treated patients, respectively. The specific infections which occurred with greater frequency among Victoza-treated antibody-positive patients were primarily nonserious upper respiratory tract infections, which occurred among 11% of Victoza-treated antibody-positive patients; and among 7%, 7% and 5% of antibody-negative Victoza-treated, placebo-treated and active-control-treated patients, respectively. Among Victoza-treated antibody-negative patients, the most common category of adverse events was that of gastrointestinal events, which occurred in 43%, 18% and 19% of antibody-negative Victoza-treated, placebo-treated and active-control-treated patients, respectively. Antibody formation was not associated with reduced efficacy of Victoza when comparing mean HbA1c of all antibody-positive and all antibody-negative patients. However, the 3 patients with the highest titers of anti-liraglutide antibodies had no reduction in HbA1c with Victoza treatment. In the five double-blind clinical trials of Victoza, events from a composite of adverse events potentially related to immunogenicity (e.g. urticaria, angioedema) occurred among 0.8% of Victoza-treated patients and among 0.4% of comparator-treated patients. Urticaria accounted for approximately one-half of the events in this composite for Victoza-treated patients. Patients who developed anti-liraglutide antibodies were not more likely to develop events from the immunogenicity events composite than were patients who did not develop anti-liraglutide antibodies. Injection site reactions Injection site reactions (e.g., injection site rash, erythema) were reported in approximately 2% of Victoza-treated patients in the five double-blind clinical trials of at least 26 weeks duration. Less than 0.2% of Victoza-treated patients discontinued due to injection site reactions. Papillary thyroid carcinoma In clinical trials of Victoza, there were 7 reported cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma in patients treated with Victoza and 1 case in a comparator-treated patient (1.5 vs. 0.5 cases per 1000 patient-years). Most of these papillary thyroid carcinomas were <1 cm in greatest diameter and were diagnosed in surgical pathology specimens after thyroidectomy prompted by findings on protocol-specified screening with serum calcitonin or thyroid ultrasound. Hypoglycemia In the eight clinical trials of at least 26 weeks duration, hypoglycemia requiring the assistance of another person for treatment occurred in 11 Victoza-treated patients (2.3 cases per 1000 patient-years) and in two exenatide-treated patients. Of these 11 Victoza-treated patients, six patients were concomitantly using metformin and a sulfonylurea, one was concomitantly using a sulfonylurea, two were concomitantly using metformin (blood glucose values were 65 and 94 mg/dL) and two were using Victoza as monotherapy (one of these patients was undergoing an intravenous glucose tolerance test and the other was receiving insulin as treatment during a hospital stay). For these two patients on Victoza monotherapy, the insulin treatment was the likely explanation for the hypoglycemia. In the 26-week open-label trial comparing Victoza to sitagliptin, the incidence of hypoglycemic events defined as symptoms accompanied by a fingerstick glucose <56 mg/dL was comparable among the treatment groups (approximately 5%). Table 5 Incidence (%) and Rate (episodes/patient year) of Hypoglycemia in the 52-Week Monotherapy Trial and in the 26-Week Combination Therapy Trials Victoza Treatment Active Comparator Placebo Comparator Monotherapy Victoza (N = 497) Glimepiride (N = 248) None Patient not able to self-treat 0 0 - Patient able to self-treat 9.7 (0.24) 25.0 (1.66) - Not classified 1.2 (0.03) 2.4 (0.04) - Add-on to Metformin Victoza + Metformin (N = 724) Glimepiride + Metformin (N = 242) Placebo + Metformin (N = 121) Patient not able to self-treat 0.1 (0.001) 0 0 Patient able to self-treat 3.6 (0.05) 22.3 (0.87) 2.5 (0.06) Add-on to Victoza + Metformin Insulin detemir + Victoza + Metformin (N = 163) Continued Victoza + Metformin alone (N = 158One patient is an outlier and was excluded due to 25 hypoglycemic episodes that the patient was able to self-treat. This patient had a history of frequent hypoglycemia prior to the study.) None Patient not able to self-treat 0 0 - Patient able to self-treat 9.2 (0.29) 1.3 (0.03) - Add-on to Glimepiride Victoza + Glimepiride (N = 695) Rosiglitazone + Glimepiride (N = 231) Placebo + Glimepiride (N = 114) Patient not able to self-treat 0.1 (0.003) 0 0 Patient able to self-treat 7.5 (0.38) 4.3 (0.12) 2.6 (0.17) Not classified 0.9 (0.05) 0.9 (0.02) 0 Add-on to Metformin + Rosiglitazone Victoza + Metformin + Rosiglitazone (N = 355) None Placebo + Metformin + Rosiglitazone (N = 175) Patient not able to self-treat 0 - 0 Patient able to self-treat 7.9 (0.49) - 4.6 (0.15) Not classified 0.6 (0.01) - 1.1 (0.03) Add-on to Metformin + Glimepiride Victoza + Metformin + Glimepiride (N = 230) Insulin glargine + Metformin + Glimepiride (N = 232) Placebo + Metformin + Glimepiride (N = 114) Patient not able to self-treat 2.2 (0.06) 0 0 Patient able to self-treat 27.4 (1.16) 28.9 (1.29) 16.7 (0.95) Not classified 0 1.7 (0.04) 0 In a pooled analysis of clinical trials, the incidence rate (per 1,000 patient-years) for malignant neoplasms (based on investigator-reported events, medical history, pathology reports, and surgical reports from both blinded and open-label study periods) was 10.9 for Victoza, 6.3 for placebo, and 7.2 for active comparator. After excluding papillary thyroid carcinoma events [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)], no particular cancer cell type predominated. Seven malignant neoplasm events were reported beyond 1 year of exposure to study medication, six events among Victoza-treated patients (4 colon, 1 prostate and 1 nasopharyngeal), no events with placebo and one event with active comparator (colon). Causality has not been established. Laboratory Tests Bilirubin In the five clinical trials of at least 26 weeks duration, mildly elevated serum bilirubin concentrations (elevations to no more than twice the upper limit of the reference range) occurred in 4.0% of Victoza-treated patients, 2.1% of placebo-treated patients and 3.5% of active-comparator-treated patients. This finding was not accompanied by abnormalities in other liver tests. The significance of this isolated finding is unknown. Calcitonin Calcitonin, a biological marker of MTC, was measured throughout the clinical development program. At the end of the clinical trials, adjusted mean serum calcitonin concentrations were higher in Victoza-treated patients compared to placebo-treated patients but not compared to patients receiving active comparator. Between group differences in adjusted mean serum calcitonin values were approximately 0.1 ng/L or less. Among patients with pretreatment calcitonin <20 ng/L, calcitonin elevations to >20 ng/L occurred in 0.7% of Victoza-treated patients, 0.3% of placebo-treated patients, and 0.5% of active-comparator-treated patients. The clinical significance of these findings is unknown. Vital signs Victoza did not have adverse effects on blood pressure. Mean increases from baseline in heart rate of 2 to 3 beats per minute have been observed with Victoza compared to placebo. The long-term clinical effects of the increase in pulse rate have not been established [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.7) ]. 6.2 Post-Marketing Experience The following additional adverse reactions have been reported during post-approval use of Victoza. Because these events are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is generally not possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. •Medullary thyroid carcinoma [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Dehydration resulting from nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) and Patient Counseling Information (17.3) ] •Increased serum creatinine, acute renal failure or worsening of chronic renal failure, sometimes requiring hemodialysis. [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) and Patient Counseling Information (17.3) ] •Angioedema and anaphylactic reactions. [see Contraindications (4), Warnings and Precautions (5.6) , Patient counseling Information (17.6) ] •Allergic reactions: rash and pruritus •Acute pancreatitis, hemorrhagic and necrotizing pancreatitis sometimes resulting in death [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ]
7 DRUG INTERACTIONS •Victoza delays gastric emptying. May impact absorption of concomitantly administered oral medications. Use caution (7). 7.1 Oral Medications Victoza causes a delay of gastric emptying, and thereby has the potential to impact the absorption of concomitantly administered oral medications. In clinical pharmacology trials, Victoza did not affect the absorption of the tested orally administered medications to any clinically relevant degree. Nonetheless, caution should be exercised when oral medications are concomitantly administered with Victoza.
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS •Limited data in patients with renal or hepatic impairment. (8.6, 8.7). 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of Victoza in pregnant women. Victoza should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Liraglutide has been shown to be teratogenic in rats at or above 0.8 times the human systemic exposures resulting from the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 1.8 mg/day based on plasma area under the time-concentration curve (AUC). Liraglutide has been shown to cause reduced growth and increased total major abnormalities in rabbits at systemic exposures below human exposure at the MRHD based on plasma AUC. Female rats given subcutaneous doses of 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 mg/kg/day liraglutide beginning 2 weeks before mating through gestation day 17 had estimated systemic exposures 0.8-, 3-, and 11-times the human exposure at the MRHD based on plasma AUC comparison. The number of early embryonic deaths in the 1 mg/kg/day group increased slightly. Fetal abnormalities and variations in kidneys and blood vessels, irregular ossification of the skull, and a more complete state of ossification occurred at all doses. Mottled liver and minimally kinked ribs occurred at the highest dose. The incidence of fetal malformations in liraglutide-treated groups exceeding concurrent and historical controls were misshapen oropharynx and/or narrowed opening into larynx at 0.1 mg/kg/day and umbilical hernia at 0.1 and 0.25 mg/kg/day. Pregnant rabbits given subcutaneous doses of 0.01, 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg/day liraglutide from gestation day 6 through day 18 inclusive, had estimated systemic exposures less than the human exposure at the MRHD of 1.8 mg/day at all doses, based on plasma AUC. Liraglutide decreased fetal weight and dose-dependently increased the incidence of total major fetal abnormalities at all doses. The incidence of malformations exceeded concurrent and historical controls at 0.01 mg/kg/day (kidneys, scapula), ≥ 0.01 mg/kg/day (eyes, forelimb), 0.025 mg/kg/day (brain, tail and sacral vertebrae, major blood vessels and heart, umbilicus), ≥ 0.025 mg/kg/day (sternum) and at 0.05 mg/kg/day (parietal bones, major blood vessels). Irregular ossification and/or skeletal abnormalities occurred in the skull and jaw, vertebrae and ribs, sternum, pelvis, tail, and scapula; and dose-dependent minor skeletal variations were observed. Visceral abnormalities occurred in blood vessels, lung, liver, and esophagus. Bilobed or bifurcated gallbladder was seen in all treatment groups, but not in the control group. In pregnant female rats given subcutaneous doses of 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 mg/kg/day liraglutide from gestation day 6 through weaning or termination of nursing on lactation day 24, estimated systemic exposures were 0.8-, 3-, and 11-times human exposure at the MRHD of 1.8 mg/day, based on plasma AUC. A slight delay in parturition was observed in the majority of treated rats. Group mean body weight of neonatal rats from liraglutide-treated dams was lower than neonatal rats from control group dams. Bloody scabs and agitated behavior occurred in male rats descended from dams treated with 1 mg/kg/day liraglutide. Group mean body weight from birth to postpartum day 14 trended lower in F2 generation rats descended from liraglutide-treated rats compared to F2 generation rats descended from controls, but differences did not reach statistical significance for any group. 8.3 Nursing Mothers It is not known whether Victoza is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for tumorigenicity shown for liraglutide in animal studies, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue Victoza, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. In lactating rats, liraglutide was excreted unchanged in milk at concentrations approximately 50% of maternal plasma concentrations. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of Victoza have not been established in pediatric patients. Victoza is not recommended for use in pediatric patients. 8.5 Geriatric Use In the Victoza clinical trials, a total of 797 (20%) of the patients were 65 years of age and over and 113 (2.8%) were 75 years of age and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. 8.6 Renal Impairment There is limited experience with Victoza in patients with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, including end-stage renal disease. However, there have been postmarketing reports of acute renal failure and worsening of chronic renal failure, which may sometimes require hemodialysis [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) and Adverse Reactions (6.2)] . Victoza should be used with caution in this patient population. No dose adjustment of Victoza is recommended for patients with renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment There is limited experience in patients with mild, moderate or severe hepatic impairment. Therefore, Victoza should be used with caution in this patient population. No dose adjustment of Victoza is recommended for patients with hepatic impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.8 Gastroparesis Victoza slows gastric emptying. Victoza has not been studied in patients with pre-existing gastroparesis.

Save on the cost of Victoza

With Our Victoza Discount Card

Be sure to ask your pharmacist not to substitute another card for ours as we are confident we offer the highest savings possible.

Medication Discount Card Medication Discount Card
Frequently Asked Questions

There are no catches to this. Simply print the card, take it to your pharmacy, and save. If you still have questions just read below...

How Do I Know My Pharmacy Will Accept It?
That's simple. The card is accepted at ALL CHAIN PHARMACIES such as CVS, Rite Aid, and Walgreens. If you don't know if your pharmacy accepts the card simply call them and give them the BIN and PCN numbers on the card. The card is accepted at most pharmacies. If you call a few one is sure to accept it.
Can I Use This In Conjunction With My Insurance?
No, unfortunately insurance companies don't allow "double-savings". However, if your insurance does not cover certain drugs (ex - cosmetic drugs, brand names, prenatal vitamins, etc) then this card may save you money. Also if your insurance requires you to pay a deductible on your brand name drugs before covering them, then this card may also provider greater savings!
How Much Will This Card Save Me?
You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
This Sounds Too Good To Be True. Is This A Scam?
Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
My Pharmacy Isn't Included. Can They Participate?
Yes! There are pharmacies who accept the pharmacy savings card that are not on our list. If you find one please email us and we'll update the list. If they are not a current partner and are interested, email us and we'll contact them to try and convince them to participate. You may also choose to call around and see if someone else in your area accepts it.
Is this the same as a Victoza copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
Savings of 70%!
I want to thank you for your prescription card. My thyroid medicine was going to cost me $118 a month. Well, naturally, I thought of your card. Your site said for my 240 tablets a month it would be about $36. A savings of $82, or roughly 70%. Thank you for the relief your card has previously given to me now and in the past. - J. Donaldson
Savings of over $200!
Thank you for putting the medication discount card on the internet. I saved over 200 dollars On my prescription. I would have never been able to afford it had it not been for this product. Again I cannot thank you enough and keep up the good work!! - M. Axler
Savings of over 50%!
I had printed out 3 different discount cards on the internet and asked the pharmacist to check prices. The lowest price was $289. I searched the internet some more, I found this site, gave the pharmacy your card and the cost was $130. What a big savings, I can't thank this site enough. - Linda S.

Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

Accepted At Over 59,000 Pharmacies Nationwide!

Including...
  • Including...
  • Cub Pharmacy
  • Kmart
  • HEB
  • Target
  • Winn Dixie
  • Costco
  • Safeway
  • Kroger
  • Tom Thumb
  • CVS
  • Brookshire`s
  • Rite Aid
  • Fred`s Pharmacy
  • Walmart
  • Long Drugs
  • Walgreens
  • Giant
  • Save Mart Pharmacy
  • Fred Meyer
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And thousands of independent pharmacies nationwide!

Liraglutide (NN2211), marketed under the brand name Victoza, is a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog that has been developed by Novo Nordisk for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The product was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on July 3, 2009, and by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on January 25, 2010. Liraglutide is marketed under the brandname Victoza in the U.S., India, Canada, Europe and Japan. It has been launched in Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Japan, Canada, the United States, France, Malaysia and Singapore. Phase I trials of an oral variant of Victoza (NN9924) started in 2010.

Wikipedia contributors. "Victoza" Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Jul 3, 2012. Web. Jul 6, 2012.

Victoza Coupon

Currently we do not have any available, however you can receive an instant discount at your pharmacy with our Victoza discount card. Create one instantly

Important Note

The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

This Victoza discount should not be confused with a Victoza coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

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"Wow! I can`t believe this actually worked. I have no insurance at this time and have to pay
I lost my insurance coverage and went online seeking help and found this CARD! It worked and saved me money $$$$$ very 1st time. There are others out there but with less coverage and a smaller list of drugs or they charge you a monthly fee. I am so happy I take 3 prescriptions a month forever and at times more and I will save over 78% as I figured it out, and that is great tell everybody you know as I am doing."
- David B.
Save up to 75% on your medication
Save up to 75% on your medication