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Save Up To 75% With This Zipsor Discount Card!

Looking for a Zipsor Coupon?

Save Up To 75% With This Zipsor Discount Card!

Estimated Savings Of Over $1,003,858
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Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Zipsor discount card helps you save money on the exact same Zipsor prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Zipsor prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

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  • ABC
  • NBC
  • FOX
  • CBS
  • San Francisco Chronicle
  • About.com
  • CIO
  • Boston.com
Estimated Savings Of Over $1,003,858

Always pay a fair price for your medication!

Our FREE Zipsor discount card helps you save money on the exact same Zipsor prescription you're already paying for. Print the card in seconds, then take it to your pharmacy the next time you get your Zipsor prescription filled. Hand it to them and save between 10% - 75% off this prescription!

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Zipsor prescribing information
This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Zipsor safely and effectively.
Before taking Zipsor please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Zipsor.
WARNING: RISK OF SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR AND GASTROINTESTINAL EVENTS Cardiovascular Risk Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may increase the risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may increase with duration of use. Patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be at greater risk [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Zipsor is contraindicated for the treatment of perioperative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery [see Contraindications (4)]. Gastrointestinal Risk NSAIDs increase the risk of serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse reactions including, bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during use and without warning symptoms. Elderly patients are at greater risk for serious gastrointestinal events [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. WARNING See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Cardiovascular Risk NSAIDs may cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may increase with duration of use. Patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be at greater risk. (5.1) Zipsor (diclofenac potassium) Liquid Filled Capsule is contraindicated for the treatment of perioperative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. (4) Gastrointestinal Risk NSAIDs cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal adverse events including, bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during use and without warning symptoms. Elderly patients are at greater risk for serious gastrointestinal events. (5.2)
1. INDICATIONS AND USAGE Zipsor is indicated for relief of mild to moderate acute pain in adults (18 years of age or older). Zipsor is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indicated for relief of mild to moderate acute pain. (1)
3. DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Oral Liquid Filled Capsule 25 mg 25 mg Liquid Filled Capsule (3)
4. CONTRAINDICATIONS Zipsor is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity (e.g., anaphylactoid reactions and serious skin reactions) to diclofenac [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7, 5.8)]. Zipsor is contraindicated in patients who have experienced asthma, urticaria, or other allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactic-like reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7, 5.13)]. Zipsor is contraindicated for the treatment of perioperative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Zipsor contains gelatin and is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to bovine protein. Known hypersensitivity to diclofenac. (4) History of asthma, urticaria, or other allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. (4) Use during the perioperative period in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. (4) Zipsor contains gelatin and should not be given to patients with known hypersensitivity to bovine protein. (4)
5. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Serious and potentially fatal cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke can occur with NSAID treatment. The lowest possible dose of Zipsor should be used in patients with known CV disease or risk factors for CV disease. (5.1) NSAIDs, including diclofenac, can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation. Zipsor should be prescribed with caution in those with a prior history of ulcer disease or gastrointestinal bleeding. (5.2) Elevation of one or more liver tests may occur during therapy with diclofenac. Zipsor should be discontinued immediately if abnormal liver tests persist or worsen. (5.3) Hypertension can occur with NSAID treatment. Blood pressure should be monitored closely during treatment with Zipsor. (5.4) Fluid retention and edema have been observed in some patients taking NSAIDs. Zipsor should be used with caution in patients with fluid retention or heart failure. (5.5) Long-term administration of NSAIDs can result in renal papillary necrosis and other renal injury. Zipsor should be used with caution in patients at greatest risk of this reaction, including the elderly, those with impaired renal function, heart failure, liver dysfunction, and those taking diuretics and ACE inhibitors. (5.6) Anaphylactoid reactions may occur in patients with the aspirin triad or in patients without prior exposure to Zipsor and should be discontinued immediately if an anaphylactoid reaction occurs. (5.7) NSAIDs can cause serious skin adverse events such as exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens - Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), which can be fatal. Zipsor should be discontinued if rash or other signs of local skin reaction occur. (5.8) 5.1 Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events Clinical trials of several COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs of up to three years duration have shown an increased risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. All NSAIDs, both COX-2 selective and nonselective, may have a similar risk. Patients with known CV disease or risk factors for CV disease may be at greater risk. To minimize the potential risk for an adverse CV event in patients treated with an NSAID, use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible. Physicians and patients should remain alert for the development of such events, even in the absence of previous CV symptoms. Inform patients about the signs and/or symptoms of serious CV events and the steps to take if they occur. Two large, controlled, clinical trials of a COX-2 selective NSAID for the treatment of pain in the first 10-14 days following CABG surgery found an increased incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke [see Contraindications (4)]. There is no consistent evidence that concurrent use of aspirin mitigates the increased risk of serious CV thrombotic events associated with NSAID use. The concurrent use of aspirin and an NSAID, such as diclofenac, does increase the risk of serious GI events [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. 5.2 Gastrointestinal (GI) Effects – Risk of GI Ulceration, Bleeding, and Perforation NSAIDs, including diclofenac, can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including, bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach, small intestine, or large intestine, which can be fatal. These serious adverse events can occur at any time, with or without warning symptoms, in patients treated with NSAIDs. Only one in five patients, who develop a serious upper GI adverse event on NSAID therapy, is symptomatic. Upper GI ulcers, gross bleeding or perforation caused by NSAIDs occur in approximately 1% of patients treated for 3-6 months, and in about 2%-4% of patients treated for one year. These trends continue with longer duration of use, increasing the likelihood of developing a serious GI event at some time during the course of therapy. However, even short-term NSAID therapy is not without risk. Prescribe NSAIDs, including Zipsor, with extreme caution in patients with a prior history of ulcer disease or gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or GI bleeding who use NSAIDs have a greater than 10-fold increased risk for developing a GI bleed compared to patients with neither of these risk factors. Other factors that increase the risk for GI bleeding in patients treated with NSAIDs include concomitant use of oral corticosteroids or anticoagulants, longer duration of NSAID therapy, smoking, use of alcohol, older age, and poor general health status. Most spontaneous reports of fatal GI events are in elderly or debilitated patients, and therefore special care should be taken in treating this population. To minimize the potential risk for an adverse GI event in patients treated with an NSAID, use the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible duration. Patients and physicians should remain alert for signs and symptoms of GI ulceration and bleeding during Zipsor therapy and promptly initiate additional evaluation and treatment if a serious GI adverse event is suspected. This should include discontinuation of Zipsor until a serious GI adverse event is ruled out. For high risk patients, alternative therapies that do not include NSAIDs should be considered. 5.3 Hepatic Effects Borderline elevations (less than 3 times the upper limit of the normal [ULN] range) or greater elevations of transaminases occurred in about 15% of diclofenac-treated patients in clinical trials of indications other than acute pain. Of the markers of hepatic function, ALT (SGPT) is recommended for the monitoring of liver injury. In clinical trials of a diclofenac - misoprostol combination product, meaningful elevations (i.e., more than 3 times the ULN) of AST (SGOT) occurred in about 2% of approximately 5,700 patients at some time during diclofenac treatment (ALT was not measured in all studies). In an open-label, controlled trial of 3,700 patients treated for 2–6 months, patients were monitored first at 8 weeks and 1,200 patients were monitored again at 24 weeks. Meaningful elevations of ALT and/or AST occurred in about 4% of the 3,700 patients and included marked elevations (>8 times the ULN) in about 1% of the 3,700 patients. In this open-label study, a higher incidence of borderline (less than 3 times the ULN), moderate (3–8 times the ULN), and marked (>8 times the ULN) elevations of ALT or AST was observed in patients receiving diclofenac when compared to other NSAIDs. Elevations in transaminases were seen more frequently in patients with osteoarthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis. Almost all meaningful elevations in transaminases were detected before patients became symptomatic. Abnormal tests occurred during the first 2 months of therapy with diclofenac in 42 of the 51 patients in all trials who developed marked transaminase elevations. In postmarketing reports, cases of drug-induced hepatotoxicity have been reported in the first month, and in some cases, the first 2 months of NSAID therapy. Postmarketing surveillance has reported cases of severe hepatic reactions, including liver necrosis, jaundice, fulminant hepatitis with and without jaundice, and liver failure. Some of these reported cases resulted in fatalities or liver transplantation. In a European retrospective population-based, case-controlled study, 10 cases of diclofenac associated drug-induced liver injury with current use compared with non-use of diclofenac were associated with a statistically significant 4-fold adjusted odds ratio of liver injury. In this particular study, based on an overall number of 10 cases of liver injury associated with diclofenac, the adjusted odds ratio increased further with female gender, doses of 150 mg or more, and duration of use for more then 90 days. Physicians should measure transaminases (ALT and AST) periodically in patients receiving long-term therapy with diclofenac, because severe hepatotoxicity may develop without a prodrome of distinguishing symptoms. The optimum times for making the first and subsequent transaminase measurements are not known. Based on clinical trial data and postmarketing experiences, transaminases should be monitored within 4 to 8 weeks after initiating treatment with diclofenac. However, severe hepatic reactions can occur at any time during treatment with diclofenac. If abnormal liver tests persist or worsen, if clinical signs and/or symptoms consistent with liver disease develop, or if systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dark urine, etc.), discontinue Zipsor immediately. To minimize the possibility that hepatic injury will become severe between transaminase measurements, inform patients of the warning signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity (e.g., nausea, fatigue, lethargy, diarrhea, pruritus, jaundice, right upper quadrant tenderness, and "flu-like" symptoms), and the appropriate action patients should take if these signs and symptoms appear. To minimize the potential risk for an adverse liver-related event in patients treated with Zipsor, use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible. Exercise caution when prescribing Zipsor with concomitant drugs that are known to be potentially hepatotoxic (e.g., acetaminophen, certain antibiotics, antiepileptics). Caution patients to avoid taking unprescribed acetaminophen while using Zipsor. 5.4 Hypertension NSAIDs, including diclofenac, can lead to new onset or worsening of preexisting hypertension, either of which may contribute to the increased incidence of CV events. Use NSAIDs, including Zipsor, with caution in patients with hypertension. Monitor blood pressure (BP) closely during the initiation of NSAID treatment and throughout the course of therapy. Patients taking ACE inhibitors, thiazides or loop diuretics may have impaired response to these therapies when taking NSAIDs. 5.5 Congestive Heart Failure and Edema Fluid retention and edema have been observed in some patients taking NSAIDs. Use Zipsor with caution in patients with fluid retention or heart failure. 5.6 Renal Effects Use caution when initiating treatment with Zipsor in patients with considerable dehydration. Long-term administration of NSAIDs has resulted in renal papillary necrosis and other renal injury. Renal toxicity has also been seen in patients in whom renal prostaglandins have a compensatory role in the maintenance of renal perfusion. In these patients, administration of an NSAID may cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation and, secondarily, in renal blood flow, which may precipitate overt renal decompensation. Patients at greatest risk of this reaction are those with impaired renal function, heart failure, liver dysfunction, those taking diuretics and ACE inhibitors, and the elderly. Discontinuation of NSAID therapy is usually followed by recovery to the pretreatment state. No information is available from controlled clinical studies regarding the use of Zipsor in patients with advanced renal disease. Therefore, treatment with Zipsor is not recommended in patients with advanced renal disease. If Zipsor therapy must be initiated, close monitoring of the patient's renal function is advisable. 5.7 Anaphylactoid Reactions As with other NSAIDs, anaphylactoid reactions may occur in patients without known prior exposure to Zipsor. Zipsor is contraindicated in patients with the aspirin triad. This symptom complex typically occurs in asthmatic patients who experience rhinitis with or without nasal polyps, or who exhibit severe, potentially fatal bronchospasm after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs [see Contraindications (4)]. 5.8 Adverse Skin Reactions NSAIDs, including diclofenac, can cause serious skin adverse reactions such as exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), which can be fatal. These serious events may occur without warning. Patients should be informed about the signs and symptoms of serious skin manifestations, and to discontinue Zipsor at the first appearance of skin rash or any other sign of hypersensitivity [see Contraindications (4)]. 5.9 Pregnancy Starting at 30 weeks gestation, Zipsor, as with other NSAIDs, should be avoided by pregnant women as premature closure of the ductus arteriosus in the fetus may occur. 5.10 Corticosteroid Treatment Zipsor cannot be expected to substitute for corticosteroids or to treat corticosteroid insufficiency. Abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids may lead to exacerbation of corticosteroid-responsive illness. Patients on prolonged corticosteroid therapy should have their therapy tapered slowly if a decision is made to discontinue corticosteroids. 5.11 Masking of Inflammation and Fever The pharmacological activity of diclofenac in reducing inflammation, and possibly fever, may diminish the utility of diagnostic signs in detecting infectious complications of presumed noninfectious, painful conditions. 5.12 Hematological Effects Anemia may occur in patients receiving NSAIDs. This may be due to fluid retention, occult or gross GI blood loss, or an incompletely described effect upon erythropoiesis. In patients on long-term therapy with NSAIDs, including diclofenac, check hemoglobin or hematocrit if they exhibit any signs or symptoms of anemia or blood loss. Zipsor is not indicated for long-term treatment. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and have been shown to prolong bleeding time in some patients. Unlike aspirin, their effect on platelet function is quantitatively less, of shorter duration, and reversible. Carefully monitor patients treated with Zipsor who may be adversely affected by alterations in platelet function, such as those with coagulation disorders or patients receiving anticoagulants. 5.13 Use in Patients with Preexisting Asthma Patients with asthma may have aspirin-sensitive asthma. The use of aspirin in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma has been associated with severe bronchospasm which can be fatal. Since cross reactivity, including bronchospasm, between aspirin and other NSAIDs has been reported in such aspirin-sensitive patients, Zipsor is contraindicated in patients with this form of aspirin sensitivity and should be used with caution in all patients with preexisting asthma [see Contraindications (4)]. 5.14 Monitoring Because serious GI tract ulcerations and bleeding can occur without warning symptoms, physicians should monitor for signs or symptoms of GI bleeding. For patients on long-term treatment with NSAIDs, periodically check a CBC and a chemistry profile. Discontinue Zipsor if abnormal liver tests or renal tests persist or worsen. Zipsor is not indicated for long-term treatment.
6. ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are discussed elsewhere in the labeling: Cardiovascular thrombotic events [see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Gastrointestinal effects [see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Hepatic effects [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] Hypertension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] Congestive heart failure and edema [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)] Renal effects [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)] Anaphylactoid reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)] Serious skin reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)] Most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 1% of Zipsor 25 mg treated subjects) are gastrointestinal experiences including abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, headache, somnolence, pruritus, and increased sweating. (6) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Depomed, Inc. at 1-866-458-6389 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Study Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared with the rates in clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The safety of Zipsor was evaluated in 965 subjects. In patients treated with Zipsor 25 mg (N=345) or a higher dose, three or four times a day, for 4 to 5 days, the most common adverse reactions (i.e., reported in ≥ 1% of Zipsor treated patients) were as follows: gastrointestinal experiences including abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, headache, somnolence, pruritus, and increased sweating. (see Table 1) Table 1 Incidence of Treatment Emergent Adverse Reactions with Incidence ≥ 1% of Zipsor Treated Patients in Multiple-Dose Studies *There was greater use of concomitant opioid rescue medication in placebo treated patients than in Zipsor treated patients. MedDRA System Organ Class and Preferred Term Zipsor* 25 mg n=345 n (%) Placebo* n=327 n (%) Any Adverse Events 144 (41.7) 181 (55.4) Abdominal Pain 24 (7.0) 11 (3.4) Constipation 11 (3.2) 9 (2.8) Diarrhea 8 (2.3) 9 (2.8) Dyspepsia 4 (1.2) 8 (2.4) Nausea 57 (16.5) 66 (20.2) Vomiting 20 (5.8) 26 (8.0) Dizziness 12 (3.5) 17 (5.2) Headache 43 (12.5) 56 (17.1) Somnolence 9 (2.6) 6 (1.8) Pruritus 5 (1.4) 6 (1.8) Sweating Increase 4 (1.2) 2 (0.6) In patients taking other NSAIDs, the most frequently reported adverse experiences occurring in approximately 1%-10% of patients are: Gastrointestinal experiences including: abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, dyspepsia, flatulence, gross bleeding/perforation, heartburn, nausea, GI ulcers (gastric/duodenal) and vomiting. Abnormal renal function, anemia, dizziness, edema, elevated liver enzymes, headaches, increased bleeding time, pruritus, rashes, and tinnitus. Additional adverse experiences reported in patients taking other NSAIDs occasionally include: Body as a Whole: fever, infection, sepsis Cardiovascular System: congestive heart failure, hypertension, tachycardia, syncope Digestive System: dry mouth, esophagitis, gastric/peptic ulcers, gastritis, gastrointestinal bleeding, glossitis, hematemesis, hepatitis, jaundice Hemic and Lymphatic System: ecchymosis, eosinophilia, leukopenia, melena, purpura, rectal bleeding, stomatitis, thrombocytopenia Metabolic and Nutritional: weight changes Nervous System: anxiety, asthenia, confusion, depression, dream abnormalities, drowsiness, insomnia, malaise, nervousness, paresthesia, somnolence, tremors, vertigo Respiratory System: asthma, dyspnea Skin and Appendages: alopecia, photosensitivity, sweating increased Special Senses: blurred vision Urogenital System: cystitis, dysuria, hematuria, interstitial nephritis, oliguria/polyuria, proteinuria, renal failure Other adverse reactions in patients taking other NSAIDs, which occur rarely are: Body as a Whole: anaphylactic reactions, appetite changes, death Cardiovascular System: arrhythmia, hypotension, myocardial infarction, palpitations, vasculitis Digestive System: colitis, eructation, liver failure, pancreatitis Hemic and Lymphatic System: agranulocytosis, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, lymphadenopathy, pancytopenia Metabolic and Nutritional: hyperglycemia Nervous System: convulsions, coma, hallucinations, meningitis Respiratory System: respiratory depression, pneumonia Skin and Appendages: angioedema, toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythema multiforme, exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, urticaria Special Senses: conjunctivitis, hearing impairment
7. DRUG INTERACTIONS Concomitant administration of diclofenac and aspirin is not generally recommended because of the potential of increased adverse effects including increased GI bleeding. (7.1) Concomitant use of anticoagulants and diclofenac have a risk of serious GI bleeding higher than users of either drug alone. (7.2) 7.1 Aspirin When administered with aspirin, diclofenac's protein binding is reduced. The clinical significance of this interaction is not known; however, as with other NSAIDs, concomitant administration of Zipsor and aspirin is not generally recommended because of the potential of increased adverse effects. 7.2 Anticoagulants The effects of anticoagulants such as of warfarin and NSAIDs on GI bleeding are synergistic, such that users of both drugs together have a risk of serious GI bleeding higher than that with use of either drug alone. 7.3 ACE-inhibitors NSAIDs may diminish the antihypertensive effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. This interaction should be given consideration in patients taking Zipsor concomitantly with ACE-inhibitors. 7.4 Diuretics Clinical studies, as well as post-marketing observations, have shown that NSAIDs can reduce the natriuretic effect of furosemide and thiazides in some patients. This response has been attributed to inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. During concomitant therapy of Zipsor and diuretics, observe patients closely for signs of renal failure [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)], as well as to assure diuretic efficacy. 7.5 Lithium NSAIDs have produced an elevation of plasma lithium levels and a reduction in renal lithium clearance. The mean minimum lithium concentration increased 15% and the renal clearance was decreased by approximately 20%. These effects have been attributed to inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis by the NSAID. Thus, when Zipsor and lithium are administered concurrently, observe patients carefully for signs of lithium toxicity. 7.6 Methotrexate NSAIDs have been reported to competitively inhibit methotrexate accumulation in rabbit kidney slices. This indicates that NSAIDs may enhance the toxicity of methotrexate. Use caution when Zipsor is administered concomitantly with methotrexate. 7.7 Cyclosporine Diclofenac, like other NSAIDs, may affect renal prostaglandins and increase the toxicity of certain drugs. Therefore, concomitant therapy with Zipsor may increase cyclosporine's nephrotoxicity. Use caution when Zipsor is administered concomitantly with cyclosporine. 7.8 Inhibitors or Substrates of Cytochrome P450 2C9 Other Considerations Diclofenac is metabolized predominantly by cytochrome P450 2C9. Co-administration of diclofenac with another drug medication known to be metabolized by or that which inhibits Cytochrome P450 2C9 may unpredictably affect the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac or the co-administered drug medication. Caution should be used to evaluate each patient's medical history when consideration is given to prescribing Zipsor [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
8. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnancy: Based on animal data, may cause fetal harm. Based on human data, starting at 30 weeks gestation, Zipsor should be avoided as premature closure of the ductus arteriosus in the fetus may occur. (5.9, 8.1) Nursing Mothers: Use with caution, as it is not known if diclofenac is excreted in human milk. (8.3) 8.1 Pregnancy Teratogenic Effects: Pregnancy Category C prior to 30 weeks gestation; Category D starting 30 weeks gestation. Starting at 30 weeks gestation, Zipsor, and other NSAIDs, should be avoided by pregnant women as premature closure of the ductus arteriosus in the fetus may occur. Zipsor can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman starting at 30 weeks gestation. If this drug is used during this time period in pregnancy, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to a fetus. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Prior to 30 weeks gestation, Zipsor should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Reproductive studies have been performed in mice given diclofenac sodium (up to 20 mg/kg/day or 60 mg/m2/day) and in rats and rabbits given diclofenac sodium (up to 10 mg/kg/day or 60 mg/m2/day for rats, and 80 mg/m2/day for rabbits, 1-fold and 2-fold an adult human daily dose of 100 mg/day, respectively), and have revealed no evidence of teratogenicity despite the induction of maternal toxicity and fetal toxicity. In rats, maternally toxic doses were associated with dystocia, prolonged gestation, reduced fetal weights and growth, and reduced fetal survival. Diclofenac has been shown to cross the placental barrier in mice, rats, and humans. Literature studies have shown that diclofenac has been shown to exert direct teratogenic effects on rat embryos in vitro at concentrations of 7.5 and 15 μg/mL, and diclofenac exposure to pregnant rats (1 mg/kg, IP) can lead to prolonged gestation as well as liver toxicity and neuronal loss in offspring. 8.2 Labor and Delivery The effects of Zipsor on labor and delivery in pregnant women are unknown. In rat studies maternal exposure to NSAIDs, as with other drugs known to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, increased incidence of dystocia, delayed parturition, and decreased pup survival. 8.3 Nursing Mothers It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk; however, there is a case report in the literature indicating that diclofenac can be detected at low levels in breast milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from Zipsor, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of Zipsor in pediatric patients has not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Clinical studies of Zipsor did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Diclofenac is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of adverse reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function. Older age increases the risk for GI bleeding. Most spontaneous reports of fatal GI events are in elderly or debilitated patients, and therefore special care should be taken in treating this population [see Gastrointestinal (GI) Effects – Risk of GI Ulceration, Bleeding, and Perforation (5.2)].

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Frequently Asked Questions

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How Do I Know My Pharmacy Will Accept It?
That's simple. The card is accepted at ALL CHAIN PHARMACIES such as CVS, Rite Aid, and Walgreens. If you don't know if your pharmacy accepts the card simply call them and give them the BIN and PCN numbers on the card. The card is accepted at most pharmacies. If you call a few one is sure to accept it.
Can I Use This In Conjunction With My Insurance?
No, unfortunately insurance companies don't allow "double-savings". However, if your insurance does not cover certain drugs (ex - cosmetic drugs, brand names, prenatal vitamins, etc) then this card may save you money. Also if your insurance requires you to pay a deductible on your brand name drugs before covering them, then this card may also provider greater savings!
How Much Will This Card Save Me?
You can expect to save between 10% - 75% off standard retail pricing. The discount varies depending on what type and brand of drug (generic or brand-name) you are purchasing.
This Sounds Too Good To Be True. Is This A Scam?
Absolutely not. As you can see there are no fees, ever. We will never ask for credit card information at any time. The reason this card works is simply because pharmacies are willing to provide a discount in order to earn your business.
My Pharmacy Isn't Included. Can They Participate?
Yes! There are pharmacies who accept the pharmacy savings card that are not on our list. If you find one please email us and we'll update the list. If they are not a current partner and are interested, email us and we'll contact them to try and convince them to participate. You may also choose to call around and see if someone else in your area accepts it.
Is this the same as a Zipsor copay card?
No this is not a copay card, It is good for the cash paying customer and cannot be used to reduce your copay.
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Savings of over 50%!
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Accepted at over 59,000 pharmacies nationwide including

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  • Albertsons

And thousands of independent pharmacies nationwide!

Diclofenac (marketed under many brand names, see below: Trade names) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) taken to reduce inflammation and as an analgesic reducing pain in certain conditions. The name is derived from its chemical name: 2-(2,6-dichloranilino) phenylacetic acid. In the United Kingdom, India, Brazil and the United States, it may be supplied as either the sodium or potassium salt, in China most often as the sodium salt, while in some other countries only as the potassium salt. Diclofenac is available as a generic drug in a number of formulations. Over-the-counter (OTC) use is approved in some countries for minor aches and pains and fever associated with common infections.

Wikipedia contributors. "Zipsor" Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Jul 4, 2012. Web. Jul 6, 2012.

Zipsor Coupon

Currently we do not have any available, however you can receive an instant discount at your pharmacy with our Zipsor discount card. Create one instantly

Important Note

The information on this website is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

This prescription discount card cannot be used in conjunction with insurance. However, some members find they save more when using the card rather than there prescription coverage.

This Zipsor discount should not be confused with a Zipsor coupon while they are essentially the same this discount card only needs to be handed to your pharmacist once and will provide continuous savings every time your prescription is filled. The only time you will need to use it again is if you change pharma

MedicationDiscountCard.com offers Average Savings of
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"Hi! Just want to say thanks to this website for providing a card such as this to the public for free! A few weeks ago I printed out one of your cards and used it on one of my medications because my co-pay went up and to my surprise instead of paying a $45.00 co-pay through my insurance, I ended up paying only $17.00 by just running it through the discount card! Now I will be comparing prices!" - Steve
Save up to 75% on your medication
Save up to 75% on your medication